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Full text of "University of New Haven Undergraduate Catalog, 1990-92"

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'4M 



Undergraduate 
Catalog 

1990-1992 




Information Directory 



President 

Ellis C. Maxcy Hall 

Provost 

Ellis C. Maxcy Hall 

Undergraduate Admissions 

Director of Admissions 

Student Services and Admissions Building 

Financial Aid 

Director of Financial Aid 

Student Services and Admissions Building 

Office for Student Life 

Dean for Student Life 
Student Center 

Student Housing 

Director for Residential Life 

Olympic Heights 

Fees 

Bursar, Business Office 
Maxcy Hall 

Transcripts 

University Registrar 

Student Services and Admissions Building 

Alumni Programs 

Director of Alumni Relations 
Maxcy Hall 



School of Arts and Sciences 

Office of the Dean 
Ellis C. Maxcy Hall 

School of Business 

Office of the Dean 
Robert B. Dodds Hall 

School of Engineering 

Office of the Dean 

Jacob F. Buckman Hall of Engineering and Applied Science 



i 



School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 

Office of the Dean 
Harugari Hall 

School of Professional Studies and Continuing Educatior 

Office of the Dean 
Gate House 

Office of the Division of Continuing Education 

Admissions 
Gate House 

The Graduate School 

Office of the Dean 

The Graduate School 

Athletic Department 

Director of Athletics 
North Campus Gymnasium 



Mailing Address 
University of New Haven 
300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, CT 06516 

Admissions Telephone 
(203) 932-7000 or 
1-800-DIAL-UNH 



University of NewHaven 



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UNDERGRADUATE 

CATALOG 

1990-92 



300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, CT 06516 
(203) 932-7000 
Admissions: (203) 932-7319 

or Toll-Free 1-800-DIAL-UNH 



This catalog supersedes all previous 
bulletins, catalogs and brochures published 
by the University of New Haven and 
describes academic programs to be offered 
beginning in fall 1990. Undergraduate 
students admitted to the university for the 
fall of 1990 and thereafter are bound by the 
regulations published in this catalog. Those 
admitted prior to fall 1990 are bound by 
those new regulations which have been duly 
instituted and announced prior to the 
semester during which they are effective. 

The University of New Haven is 
committed to equal access to educational 
and employment opportunities for all 
applicants regardless of race, creed, color, 
religion, sex, national origin, age or 
disability in compliance with federal and 
state statutes. Benefits, privileges and 
opportunities offered by the University of 
New Haven are available to all students and 
employees on a non-discriminatory basis in 
accordance with federal and state statutes. 
In recruitment of students and employees, 
the University of New Haven subscribes to 
a policy of affirmative action and equal 
opportunity. 

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, 
equal opportunity and Title IX may be 
directed to the director of equal opportunity. 

Any male generic terms and titles 
appearing throughout this book refer to both 
males and females and are used for 
grammatical simplicity and semantic 
convenience. 



Every effort has been made to ensure that 
the information contained in this publication 
is accurate and current as of the date of pub- 
lication; however, the university cannot be 
held responsible for typographical errors or 
omissions that may have occurred. 

Volume XIII No. 11 June 1990 

University of New Haven is published twelve 
times per year, in January, February (2), 
April, May (2), June, July (2), August and 
November (2), by the University of New Ha- 
ven, 300 Orange Avenue, West Haven, CT 
06516. Second-class postage paid at New 
Haven, CT, publication number USPS 423- 
410. Postmaster: Please send form 3579 to 
Office of Public Relations, University of New 
Haven, P.O. Box 9605, New Haven, CT 
06535-0605. 



The university reserves the right, at any 
time, to make whatever changes may be 
deemed necessary in admission 
requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
policies, regulations and academic 
programs prior to the start of any class, 
term, semester, trimester or session. All 
such changes are effective at such times 
as the proper authorities determine and 
may apply not only to prospective 
students but also to those who already are 
enrolled in the university. 



CONTENTS 

Programs of Study 4 

Academic Calendar 6 

General Information 13 

Schools of the University 15 

Degrees of the University 17 

University Core Curriculum 19 

Facilities 23 

Admission and Registration 27 

Academic Regulations 33 

Tuition, Fees and Expenses 47 

Financial Aid 53 

Student Life 61 

School of Arts and Sciences 69 

School of Business 103 

School of Engineering 121 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and 

Tourism Administration 141 

School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education 149 

Course Descriptions 169 

Board, Administration and Faculty . 233 

Index 251 



Programs of Study 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Applied Mathematics 

Computer Science, B.S 84 

Natural Science, B.S 85 

Statistics, B.S 85 

Art, B.A 93 

Biology, A.S., B.A., B.S 73 

Biology — Premedical, Predental, 

Preveterinary, B.S 73 

Biomedical Computing, B.S 74 

Chemistry, B.A 77 

Communication, B.A 78 

Economics, B.A 79 

English 80 

Literature, B.A 81 

Writing, B.A 81 

Environmental Science, A.S., B.S. 76 

General Studies, A.S 71 

Graphic Design, A.S., B.A 94 

Photography, A.S., B.A 94 

History, B.A 82 

Interior Design, A.S., B.A 95 

Pre-architecture, B.A 96 

Journalism, A.S 78 

Mathematics, B.A 84 

Music and Sound 

Recording, B.A., B.S 98 

Physics, B.A., B.S 86 

Political Science, B.A 87 

Psychology, B.A 89 

Community-Clinical, B.A 90 

Industrial/Organizational, 

B.A 91 



Sociology, B.A 92 

Social Services, B.A 92 

Music, B.A 98 

School of Business 

Accounting 105 

Financial, B.S 106 

Managerial, B.S 106 

Business Administration, A.S., 

B.S Ill 

Human Resources 

Management, B.S 112 

Management Information 

Systems, BlS 112 

Sports Industries 

Management, B.S 112 

Business Economics, B.S 110 

Communication, A.S 108 

Managerial & Organizational 

Communication, B.S 107 

Mass Communication, B.S 108 

Public Relations, B.S 108 

Criminal Justice 115 

Corrections, 

A.S., B.S 116 

Law Enforcement 

Administration, A.S., B.S. .. 116 
Law Enforcement Science, 

B.S 116 

Security Management, B.S 117 

Finance, B.S 110 

Forensic Science, B.S 117 



International Business, B.S 114 

Marketing, B.S 114 

Public Administration, B.S 119 

Health Administration, B.S. ... 119 

School of Engineering 

Chemistry, A.S., B.S 125 

Chemical Engineering, B.S 124 

Civil Engineering, A.S., B.S 127 

Computer Science, A.S., B.S 132 

Electrical Engineering, A.S., B.S. 129 
Industrial Engineering, A.S., 

B.S 131 

Industrial Technology 

— Shipbuilding, B.S 137 

Materials Technology, A.S., B.S. 135 
Mechanical Engineering, A.S., 

B.S 134 

Mechanical Technology 

—Shipbuilding, A.S 137 

School of Hotel, Restaurant 
and Tourism Administration 

Hotel and Restaurant 

Management, A.S., B.S 144 

Tourism and Travel 

Administration, A.S., B.S 146 



School of Professional Studies 
and Continuing Education 

Air Transportation Management, 
B.S 152 

Arson Investigation, B.S 153 

Aviation Science, A.S 152 

Fire and Occupational Safety, 

A.S 156 

Fire Science 

Administration, B.S 155 

Technology, B.S 155 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Administration, A.S., B.S 158 

Technology, A.S., B.S 159 

Professional Studies, A.S., B.S. . 160 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



August 
September 



October 

November 

December 



January 1991 
January 



Fall Semester 1990 

Tuition and residence charges due 

Residence Halls open for new students 

Residence Halls open for returning students 

Orientation 

Evening Classes begin 

Day Classes begin 

Last day to add a course without a late fee 

Last day for schedule revision 

Last day to petition for January graduation 
Last day to drop courses 

No Evening Classes 
Thanksgiving Recess 

Day Classes end 
Evening Classes end 
Reading Day 
Final Examinations 
Last Day of Semester 
Residence Halls close 

Commencement 

Intersession 1991 

Classes begin 
Holiday 
Classes end 



Wed., 1 

Tues., 4 
Wed., 5 

Tues.-Wed., 4-5 
Wed., 5 
Thurs., 6 
Mon., 10 
Wed., 12 

Men., 15 
Fri., 19 

Wed., 21 
Thurs.-Sat., 22-24 

Fri., 14 
Sat., 15 
Sat., 15 

Mon.-Fri., 17-21 
Fri., 21 
Fri., 21 

Sat., 19 



Wed., 2 
Mon., 21 
Wed., 23 



January 



February 
March 



May 



June 

May 

August 

August 
September 



October 
November 



Spring Semester 1991 

Tuition and residence charges due 

Residence Halls open for new students 

Residence Halls open for returning students 

Orientation 

Classes begin 

Last day to add a course without a late fee 

Last day for schedule revision 

Holiday 

Last day to petition for June graduation 

Last day to drop courses 

Spring Recess 

Classes resume 

Holiday 

Classes end 
Reading Day 
Final Examinations 
Last Day of Semester 
Residence Halls close 

Commencement 

Summer Sessions 1991 

Classes begin 

Classes end 

Fall Semester 1991 

Tuition and residence charges due 

Residence Halls open for new students 

Residence Halls open for returning students 

Orientation 

Evening Classes begin 

Day Classes begin 

Last day to add a course without a late fee 

Last day for schedule revision 

Last day to petition for January graduation 
Last day to drop courses 

No Evening Classes 
Thanksgiving Recess 



Wed., 2 
Tues., 22 
Wed., 23 
Wed., 23 
Thurs., 24 
Mon., 28 
Wed., 30 

Men., 18 

Fri., 1 
Fri., 1 

Mon.-Sat., 11-16 
Mon., 18 
Thurs.-Fri., 28-29 

Mon., 13 
Tues., 14 
Wed.-Tues., 15-21 
Tues., 21 
Tues., 21 

Sat., 1 



Wed., 22 
Sat., 24 

Thurs., 1 

Tues., 3 
Wed., 4 

Tues. -Wed., 3-4 
Wed., 4 
Thurs., 5 
Mon., 9 
Wed., 11 

Tues., 15 
Fri., 18 

Wed., 27 
Thurs.-Sat., 28-30 



December 



January 1992 
January 

January 



February 
March 



April 
May 



Day Classes end 
Evening Classes end 
Reading Day 
Final Examinations 
Last Day of Semester 
Residence Halls close 

Commencement 

Intersession 1992 

Classes begin 
Holiday 
Classes end 

Spring Semester 1992 

Tuition and residence charges due 

Residence Halls open for new students 

Residence Halls open for returning students 

Orientation 

Classes begin 

Last day to add a course without a late fee 

Last day for schedule revision 

Holiday 

Last day to petition for June graduation 
Last day to drop courses 
Spring Recess 
Classes resume 

Holiday 

Classes end 
Reading Day 
Final Examinations 
Last Day of Semester 
Residence Halls close 



Fri., 13 
Sat., 14 
Sat., 14 

Mon.-Fri., 16-20 
Fri., 20 
Fri., 20 

Sat., 18 



Thurs., 2 
Men., 20 
Thurs., 23 



Thurs., 2 
Wed., 22 
Thurs., 23 
Thurs., 23 
Fri., 24 
Tues., 28 
Fri., 31 

Men., 17 

Men., 2 

Fri., 6 

Men. -Sat., 16-21 

Mon., 23 

Fri., 17 

Mon., 11 
Tues., 12 
Wed. -Tues., 13-19 
Tues., 19 
Tues., 19 



June 



Commencement 



Sat., 6 



Undergraduate Trimester 

Calendar 
(Southeastern Connecticut) 





Fall Trimester 1990 




September 


Classes begin 


Men., 10 


November 


Thanksgiving Recess 


Mon.-Sat., 19-24 


December 


Classes end 

Winter Trimester 1991 


Fri., 14 


January 


Classes begin 
Holiday 


Mon., 7 
Men., 21 


February 


Holiday 


Mon., 18 


March 


Holiday 


Fri., 29 


April 


Classes end 

Spring Trimester 1991 


Fri., 5 


April 


Classes begin 


Mon., 8 


May 


Holiday 


Mon., 27 


July 


Classes end 

Summer Session 1991 


Fri., 5 


July 


Session begins 


Mon., 15 


August 


Session ends 

Fall Trimester 1991 


Fri., 23 


September 


Classes begin 


Mon., 9 


November 


Thanksgiving Recess 


Mon.-Sat., 25-30 


December 


Classes end 


Fri., 13 



Winter Trimester 1992 



January 


Classes begin 
Holiday 


Mon., 6 
Mon., 20 


February 


Holiday 


Men., 17 


April 


Classes end 

Spring Trimester 1992 


Fri., 3 


April 


Classes begin 
Holiday 


Men., 6 
Fri., 17 


May 


Holiday 


Mon., 25 


July 


Classes end 

Summer Session 1992 


Fri., 3 


July 


Session begins 


Men., 13 


August 


Session ends 


Fri., 21 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 



13 



The University of New Haven is a private, 
urban, coeducational university with a 
contemporary and innovative view of higher 
education. 

The undergraduate programs here are 
designed to meet the needs of today's 
students by offering them the professional 
training they will need for careers in a highly 
competitive job market. 

The university balances its curriculum by 
offering a liberal, humanistic education with 
professional programs in business, 
engineering, computer science and other 
advanced technical programs. 

The university also is flexible enough to 
meet the needs of students who work while 
they attend school at UNH. The Division of 
Continuing Education offers a range of 
programs at night. A cooperative education 
program makes it possible for students to 
alternate semesters of class attendance with 
related work experience. 

By responding to the educational needs of 
our students, the University of New Haven 
has become a major regional university 
serving both our students and the business 
community. 

Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is a 
coeducational, non-sectarian, independent 
institution of higher learning, chartered by 
the General Assembly of the State of 
Connecticut. 

The University of New Haven is fully 
accredited by the New England Association 



of Schools and Colleges which accredits 
schools and colleges in the six New England 
states. Membership in the association 
indicates that the institution has been 
carefully evaluated and found to meet 
standards agreed upon by qualified 
educators. 

The university holds membership in the 
American Council on Education, the 
Association of American Colleges, the 
National Association of Independent 
Colleges and Universities, the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology, the 
Criminal Justice Accreditation Council, the 
College Entrance Examination Board and is 
a member of other regional and national 
professional organizations. 

Individual programs, departments and 
schools hold various forms of national 
professional accreditations, listed under 
relevant sections of the catalog. 

History 

The University of New Haven was 
founded in 1920 as the New Haven YMCA 
Junior College, a branch of Northeastern 
University. The college became New Haven 
College in 1926 by an act of the Connecticut 
General Assembly. For nearly 40 years, the 
college held classes in space rented from 
Yale University. 

In September 1958, the college completed 
construction of a classroom building on Cold 
Spring Street, New Haven, for its daytime 
engineering building. That same year, the 
college received its first authorization from 



14 

the Connecticut legislature to offer the 
bachelor of science degree in the fields of 
business accounting, management and 
industrial engineering. 

But though its student body on the new 
Cold Spring Street campus numbered fewer 
than 200 persons, the college's facilities were 
fast becoming overcrowded. To meet the 
needs of the college and the local 
community, the Board of Governors 
purchased, in 1960, three buildings and 25 
acres of land in West Haven, formerly 
belonging to the New Haven County 
Orphanage. 

The combination of increased classroom 
space and the four-year degree program 
sparked a period of tremendous growth in 
enrollment and facilities. In 1961, the year 
after the college moved to West Haven, the 
graduating class numbered 75. Almost thirty 
years later the figure has climbed to more 
than 1,200. 

New Haven College received full 
accreditation of its baccalaureate programs 
from the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges in 1966. In 1969, the 
college took a major step forward with the 
addition of the Graduate School. Initially 
offering programs in business 
administration and industrial engineering, 
the Graduate School expanded rapidly. 
Today, 22 programs and additional courses 
have pushed graduate enrollment to more 
than 2,600. 

On the fiftieth anniversary of the 
founding of the college, in 1970, New Haven 
College became the University of New 
Haven, reflecting the increased scope and 
the diversity of academic programs offered. 

Today, the university offers more than 100 
graduate and undergraduate degree 
programs in six schools: the Graduate 
School and the School of Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Business, the School of 
Engineering, the School of Hotel, 
Restaurant and Tourism Administration and 
the School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education. 

Undergraduate courses and programs are 
offered in West Haven on the main campus 
as well as in the Groton area and other off- 
campus and in-plant sites. Graduate courses 



and programs are offered in West Haven 
and in Clinton, Waterbury, Middletown, 
Trumbull, Stamford, Groton and 
Wallingford. 



Philosophy 

Th ebasic objectives that guide an d 
govern the academic programs and ov erall 
li fe of the university are: 

• to recognize the educational interests of 
students geared toward specific 
professions and careers and prepare 
students for graduate and professional 
training beyond the baccalaureate, 

• to provide undergraduate students with a 
liberal and humanistic education to help 
them acquire an understanding of society 
and their cultural heritage, 

• to develop in all students a critical mind in 
the sense of a capacity to test and challenge 
previous assumptions and new ideas, 

• to provide all students with a breadth of 
knowledge and a sensitivity to weigh 
ethical and moral issues and form values 
and life goals, 

• to create for all students an environment 
which nurtures students' creative abilities 
and their intellectual curiosity through 
opportunities for independent study and 
investigation, 

• to allow all students in a complex and 
technological society to pursue 
professional training which will assist 
them in pursuing rewarding and 
productive careers and adjusting to 
changing labor market conditions, 

• to provide strong programs in student 
services, intercollegiate athletics, and 
intramurals which address students' 
psychological, social, cultural, and 
physical needs through a variety of 
individual and group activities directed 
toward the development of well-rounded 
graduates, 

• to provide all students with opportunities 
to participate in work and service activities 
which allow them to use skills and exercise 
judgment and responsibility in a variety of 
settings outside the university 
community. 



• to provide to the broad community, and to 
the state and nation, a flexible response 
system capable of meeting new and 
expanding educational needs in industry, 
service organizations, government, and 
non-profit institutions, and 

• to promote research and scholarship 
among the faculty and doctoral students as 
a means of supporting the teaching 
commitments of the institution. 

Schools of the University 

School of Arts and Sciences 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers 
associate degree programs in seven 
academic fields and bachelor's degrees in 23 
fields from art to music. School certificates 
offer specialized instruction to students 
interested in a concentrated exposure to one 
subject area, in fields such as journalism, 
paralegal studies and graphic design. 

Through the Graduate School, the School 
of Arts and Sciences also offers master's 
degree programs as well as a senior 
professional certificate. Detailed information 
on the graduate programs is available in the 
Graduate School catalog. 

School of Business 

The School of Business offers programs in 
the departments of accounting; , c ommunica- 
tjon, economi cs / finance, management , 
marketin g and public managemen t which 
includes criminal justice, forensic science 
and public administration. Certificates 
cover aspects of communication and 
criminal justice. 

Through the Graduate School, the School 
of Business offers a doctoral degree in 
rr ianagement svstems and master's degree 
programs as well as a number of business- 
related senior professional certificates. 

School of Engineering 

The School of Engineering offers degree 
programs in nine fields: chemistry, chemical 
engineering, civil engineering, computer 
science, electrical engineering, industrial 
engineering, mechanical engineering, 
materials technology, and industrial and 



The University 15 

mechanical technology — shipbuilding 
(UNH/SECT). 

Master of science degree programs and a 
senior professional certificate are offered 
through the Graduate School in several 
engineering fields. Students may consult the 
Graduate School catalog for more details. 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and 

Tourism Administration 

The School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration offers degree 
programs through the departments of hotel 
and restaurant management and tourism 
and travel administration. The school's 
certificates offer concentrated study in the 
hotel and travel fields. 

Master of business administration 
concentrations in hotel and restaurant 
management and tourism and travel 
administration are offered through the 
Graduate School. Students may consult the 
Graduate School catalog for more details. 

School of Professional Studies and 

Continuing Education 

The School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education offers programs 
leading to the associate in science degree, 
the bachelor of science degree, and certain 
master of science degrees. In addition, the 
school offers certificates and graduate-level 
professional certificates as well as part-time 
credit and non-credit courses both on and 
off campus. The school has four distinct 
units: 

Department of Professional Studies 

Professional studies offers associate in 
science degree programs in aviation science, 
occupational safety and health, fire and 
occupational safety, and professional 
studies. Bachelor's degree programs are 
offered in fire protection engineering, fire 
science administration, arson investigation 
with a minor in criminal justice, fire science 
technology with a minor available in civil 
engineering, air transportation management 
and professional studies. The bachelor's 
degree in occupational safety and health 
permits the selection of a minor tailored to 



16 

the interests of the individual. The 
department also maintains a fleet of aircraft 
for student training and an office at Tweed- 
New Haven airport. 

Division of Continuing Education 

More than 132 associates, bachelors and 
certificate programs are offered by the 
Division of Continuing Education during 
the fall and spring semesters. Summer day 
and evening courses are offered during 
several sessions. During the winter 
intersession in January, both innovative and 
conventional intensive courses are offered 
mornings and afternoons. All the offerings 
in this division carry the same faculty 
support, standards, and degree 
requirements as the Day Division. 

Those interested may call the Continuing 
Education Office to receive a schedule before 
each semester and further information on 
evening programs. 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut offers 
associates, bachelors and certificate 
programs for students in the Groton area. 
Engineering, business and paralegal courses 
are available on an evening basis to the 
general public as well as to employees of 
certain corporations who have on-site 
programs. For further information please 
contact UNH in Southeastern Connecticut. 

Division of Corporate and Professional 
Development 

This division offers a variety of non-credit 
certificate courses in both specialized and 
general areas of study as well as intensive 
seminars and workshops. Non-credit 
courses offer the opportunity to upgrade 
professional skills, explore new directions 
and increase enjoyment of leisure time. 

In conjunction with the Institute of 
Computer Studies, the division offers a full 
range of computer courses from individual 
and family applications of home computers 
to advanced languages and applications for 
individuals with more experience, and 
business applications with specific and 
individualized focus. 

The Division of Corporate and 
Professional Development also provides the 
necessary courses for state certification in 



such fields as real estate and insurance as 
well as a large variety of personal 
enrichment and professional development 
workshops. Most courses meet one evening 
per week and generally include six to 12 
sessions. 

The Institute for Teacher Development 
provides programs for Connecticut primary 
and secondary school teachers to fulfill their 
continuing education unit (CEU) 
requirements. 

The Safety Health and Environmental 
Training Institute of Connecticut provides 
specialized education for both natural and 
man-made environmental concerns. 

The division also designs and delivers 
seminars and training programs to a wide 
range of Connecticut companies and 
organizations. Custom-tailored programs 
delivered in recent years range from basic 
communication skills to modern 
management concepts and the newest 
engineering technology. The division is 
prepared to meet the specific training needs 
of any area company or organization. The 
university awards CEUs to individuals who 
successfully complete professional 
development seminars or courses. 

Graduate School 

The Graduate School, founded in 1969, 
offers a doctoral program, 22 master's 
degree programs and 29 advanced 
certificates. All academic programs are 
offered at the main campus in West Haven. 
Courses leading to the master's degree in 
business administration and other selected 
programs are offered at off-campus locations 
in Clinton, Groton, Middletown, Stamford, 
Trumbull, Wallingford and Waterbury. 

Programs offered by the Graduate School 
are: 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Business Administration/Industrial 
Engineering (dual degree) 

Business Administration/Public 
Administration (dual degree) 

Community Psychology 

Computer and Information Science 

Criminal Justice 

Electrical Engineering 



Environmental Engineering 
Environmental Science 
Executive M.B.A. 
Fire Science 
Forensic Science 
Industrial Engineering 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
Industrial Relations 
Management Systems (Sc.D.) 
Mechanical Engineering 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Management 
Operations Research 
Public Administration 
Taxation 

Senior Professional Certificates 
Professional Certificates 

The Graduate School operates on a 
trimester calendar, with terms beginning in 
September, January and April. Classes meet 
once each week during the regular 
trimesters. In addition, an abbreviated 
summer session is offered during July and 
August. Classes meet twice each week in 
this special summer session. 

To accommodate working professionals, 
most courses meet in the evenings, 
beginning at 5:30 or 6 p.m. A few classes are 
scheduled earlier in the day or on Saturdays. 
Students may enroll either full- or part-time. 

Additional information regarding 
graduate programs may be obtained from 
the Graduate School Admissions Office or 
by calling (203) 932-7133. 

Degrees Offered by the 
University 

Undergraduate Degrees 

The University of New Haven offers 
undergraduate programs leading to the 
bachelor of arts degree, the bachelor of 
science degree, the associate in science 
degree and a number of certificates. 

Bachelor's Degrees 

The bachelor's degree programs require a 
minimum of 120 credit hours of study and 
take four years for full-time students. Many 
other University of New Haven students 
take advantage of the full range of courses 



The University 17 

offered in the evening and complete their 
undergraduate degree on a part-time 
schedule that complements their own 
careers. 

Associate Degrees 

Associate degree programs are designed 
to encourage students to begin their college 
education even though they do not yet want 
to commit themselves to a full, four-year 
course of study. A minimum of 60 credit 
hours are required for the associate degree, 
and the credits earned usually apply toward 
relevant bachelor's degree programs. 

Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward 
an undergraduate degree by registering for 
one of the certificates offered by the 
university. 

Each certificate is carefully designed as a 
concentrated introduction to a particular 
subject area and consists of courses totaling 
15 to 30 credit hours. 

Later, students may choose to apply the 
credits they have earned toward their 
undergraduate degree at the university. 

For a list of certificates, see page 165. 
Please contact the Division of Continuing 
Education for further details. 

Graduate Degrees 

Through the UNH Graduate School, 
programs are offered leading to the master 
of arts degree, the master of science degree, 
the master of public administration, the 
master of business administration, the 
executive master of business administration, 
the doctor of science in management 
systems and a number of professional and 
senior professional certificates. For more 
information, contact the Graduate School or 
consult the Graduate School catalog. 



19 



UNIVERSITY 

CORE 

CURRICULUM 



The University of New Haven is a 
microcosm of American society: atomistic, 
necessarily specialized, and unavoidably 
complex. Nevertheless, it is the belief of the 
university that all students matriculating for 
a bachelor's degree should develop a 
common set of skills; furthermore, they 
should be exposed to a commonality of 
intellectual experiences which are the 
distinguishing traits of a university 
graduate. The purpose of the University 
Core Curriculum is to prepare all graduates 
for the changing, complex lives they will 
lead, to focus on the quality of their lives, 
and to enhance and expand the 
development of the wisdom by which they 
will frame their lives. This can be done best 
through a core curriculum which includes 
the student's major field of study. This core 
represents our philosophy of an integrated 
collegiate education. 

The University Core Curriculum, in 
seeking to accomplish the above specific 
ends, is dynamic. It offers students the 
broadest, rather than the narrowest, 
possible perspective in their disciplines. For 
that reason, the University Core Curriculum 
includes new interdisciplinary courses as 
well as existing disciplinary courses. The 
interrelationship of these courses will 
enable students to develop skills and 
conceptual abilities and to share common 
experiences. 



These encompass: 
Communication Skills 
Clear Reasoning: 
Scientific method 
Quantitative reasoning 
Problem solving and synthetic 
reasoning 
Dimensions of Our World, including the 
following aspects: 
Social and cultural 
Natural and physical 
Technical 
Historical 
Ethical and moral 
Aesthetic 

Courses will be chosen from the 
following categories: 
Laboratory science 
Social sciences 
History 

Literature or Philosophy 
Fine Arts or music or theater 

Plus depth of knowledge in at least one 
field — the Major. 

The University Core Curriculum 
encompasses a minimum of 11 courses, 
totaling 34 credits. Individual schools or 
departments may require additional core 
curriculum courses for their students. Some 
of the objectives outlined above are 
incorporated into more than one of the 
following areas. 



20 

University Core Curriculum 

Credits 

Communication Skills 6 

The intent of this area is to develop 
student skills in reading, writing and 
communicating in the English language. 
Two courses are required, and should be 
taken in the freshman year: 

E 105/Expository Writing 

E 110/Composition and Literature 

If a student places out of E 105, then CO 
100 /Human Communication or a technical 
writing course (E 200 or ¥215) may be taken. 

Clear Reasoning 9 

Quantitative Skills 

All students must be able to think 
abstractly, to solve problems and to possess 
a basic ability to do numerical 
computations and elementary algebra. 

Choose from the following: 

M 109/Elementary College Algebra 

M 127/Finite Mathematics 
or demonstration of an equivalent level of skill. 
Students may satisfy this requirement by 
satisfactory performance on a placement test 
administered by the mathematics department. 

Computers 

Students should be able to use a computer 
to meet their needs. They should be able to 
operate the machinery, bring a program into 
execution, and use that program to 
accomplish some useful end. 

Students may select one of the following 
options: 

Option A - one course from the following: 

CS 102/Introduction to Programming/ 

FORTRAN 

CS 106/Introduction to Programming/ 

PASCAL 

CS 107/Introduction to Data Processing 

CS 108/Introduction to Programming/BASIC 

Option B - One of the following three-course 
sequences: 

I M 127/Finite Mathematics 
M 228/Elementary Statistics 
SO 350/Survey Research 



II M 127/Finite Mathematics 

P 301/Statistics for Behavioral Sciences 
P 305/Experimental Methods in 
Psychology 

III M 127/Finite Mathematics 

P 301/Statistics for Behavioral Sciences 
SO 350/Survey Research 

Scientific Methodology 

Scientific methodology is often taken 
to represent the best example of clear 
reasoning and is one of the basic methods 
through which we gain knowledge of the 
universe. Applications of scientific 
methodology have led to a life on earth 
dramatically different from the kind of life 
human beings have led for most of history. 
Understanding the methods of science will 
improve the student's ability to reason 
clearly. In special cases this requirement can 
be fulfilled by a research course that 
familiarizes the student with the theory, 
methods, and culture of science. A request 
for such substitution must be made to the 
Core Curriculum Committee. The 
substitution will be approved if the request 
is accompanied by a proposal for a research 
project and the proposal requires the 
student to provide a survey of the literature 
and to discuss methodology, causal 
relationships observed, and the results and 
significance of the research. 

Students may select one of the following: 
ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 
HS 108/History of Science 
HU 300/The Nature of Science 
PL 240/Philosophy of Science and 
Technology 

Dimensions of Our World 16 

Laboratory Science 

Students should understand the 
methodology of at least one basic science. 
One laboratory course satisfies the 
requirement: 

BI 121/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I 
BI 122/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory II 
BI 253/Biology for Science Majors with 

Laboratory I 



BI 254/BioIogy for Science Majors with 

Laboratory II 
CH 103 & 104/Introduction to General 

Chemistry with Laboratory 
CH 107 & 108/Elementary Organic 

Chemistry with Laboratory 
CH 115 & 117/General Chemistry I with 

Laboratory 
CH 116 & 118/General Chemistry II with 

Laboratory 
PH 100/Introductory Physics with 

Laboratory 
PH 103 &105/GeneraI Physics I with 

Laboratory 
PH 104 & 106/General Physics II with 

Laboratory 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat, and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Social Sciences 

Some breadth of understanding of our 
society is to be acquired by taking a basic 
course in each of two different social science 
departments. Acceptable choices are: 

P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 

PS 101/Introduction to Politics 

PS 121/American Government 

PS 241/International Relations 

PS 281-283, 285/Comparative Government 

EC 133/Principles of Economics I 

EC 134/Principles of Economics II 

SO 113/Sociology 

SO 114/Contemporary Social Problems 

SO 221/Cultural Anthropology 

SO 390/Sociology of Organizations 



University Core Curriculum 21 

History 

Early Western civilizations are studied as 
a basis for understanding our own society: 

HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 

Literature or Philosophy 

Students should acquire some depth of 
understanding of the human condition and 
of human endeavor. One sophomore-level 
course in literature or philosophy is to be 
selected from: 

E 201/Literary Heritage 
E 202/Modern Literature 
PL 201/Philosophical Methods 
PL 215/Nature of the Self 
PL 222/Ethics 

Fine Arts or Theater 

Students should study the methodology, 
history, practice and content of one of the 
fine arts. Any one of the following is 
acceptable: 

AT 101/Introduction to Studio Art 
AT 231/Histor>' of Art I 
AT 232/History of Art II 
AT 331/Contemporary Art 
MU Ill/Introduction to Music 
MU 112/Introduction to Music 
MU 150/Introduction to Music Theory 
MU 211/History of Rock 
T 131/Introduction to the Theatre 
T 132/Theatrical Style 
T 241/Early World Drama and Theatre 
T 242/Modern World Drama and Theatre 



23 



SERVICES AND 
FACILITIES OF 
THE UNIVERSITY 



The university's 70-acre campus contains 
21 buildings that offer students modern 
laboratory and library facilities, the latest in 
computer technology and equipment, an 
athletic complex and residential facilities. 

Located in West Haven, about 10 minutes 
from downtown New Haven, the main 
campus includes administration and 
classroom facilities in Maxcy Hall, the 
Graduate School, Buckman Hall 
Engineering and Sciences Building, Echlin 
Hall Computer Center, the bookstore, the 
Psychology Building, Robert B. Dodds Hall 
and residence halls. 

The South Campus includes Harugari 
Hall and the Student Services and 
Admissions Building, while the North 
Campus is the site of the university's athletic 
fields and gymnasium. 

Some of these facilities are described in the 
following paragraphs. 

Marvin K. Peterson Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named 
in honor of a former university president, 
was open in 1974. It includes three floors of 
reading space, stacks, and reference areas. 
Information is made accessable through 
manual as well as electronic retrieval 
methods. Materials are stored in a variety of 
formats including print, audio, video, 
microform, and CD-ROM disks. 

The UNH library includes approximately 
300,000 volumes on the main campus plus 
collections in off-campus centers. The library 



subscribes to hundreds of journals and uses 
telefacsimile to transmit articles and 
information between its own and other 
libraries across the country. 

The main library is a U.S. government 
documents depository library and selects 
approximately one third of the U.S. 
government yearly output. Additional 
resources are accessed by means of 
memberships in on-line data bases such as 
OCLC, Dialog, and Dow Jones. 

Under reciprocal agreements and 
contracts, UNH students may borrow 
materials from other local colleges and many 
substantial public libraries. Doctoral 
students have the use of the Yale University 
library. 

At the Southeastern Connecticut campus, 
the UNH library center is housed in the 
modern, full-service Groton Public Library. 
This unique arrangement provides 112,000 
titles from the public library, 3,200 
monographs and 125 journals, plus 
reference materials geared specifically to 
UNH curriculum. Audiovisual services are 
provided by the Grasso Technical School 
media center. UNH graduate students have 
additional borrowing privileges at the 
Connecticut College library. 

In Waterbury, the Traurig Library on the 
Post College campus has a UNH curriculum- 
based collection of 1,035 monographs, 25 
journals, reference materials, and 250 titles 
in microfiche. 



24 



At all sites, students are assisted by 
professional reference librarians. Freshmen 
receive instruction in how to use a library. 
Upperclass and graduate student library 
orientation is available. Bibliographic 
instruction courses, geared to international 
students, are provided. 

Library guides and selected instructional 
support resource materials are also provided 
and updated each year. 

Computer Center 

The university Computer Center provides 
both administrative and academic functions 
at the university. It maintains three 
independent processing units, each 
accessible from any given terminal via a 
network processor. 

A DEC VAX 6220 is used for the 
university's MIS; it has a 32-bit processor, 64 
megabytes of main memory with an 
ethernet controller and peripheral storage 
capacity of 1.2 gigabytes. The operating 
system is VMS and the CPU is rated at 4 
mips. 

A Data General Eclipse MV8000 is also 
used for administrative work; it has a 32-bit 
processor, 8 megabytes of main memory, 
and peripheral storage capacity of 1.3 
gigabytes. 

Another Data General Eclipse MV8000 is 
dedicated to academic support. It has 10 
megabytes of main memory and a virtual 
address range of 4 gigabytes with peripheral 
storage of 1.4 gigabytes. The operating 
system is AOS/VS with multiprogramming/ 
multitasking capability and can handle up to 
255 concurrent processes. Currently, there 
are 72 VDT ports, a 600 1pm printer, several 
dot-matrix printers, and a laser printer. 
Terminals for student use are spread 
throughout three clusters on campus with 
the largest concentration located in Echlin 
Hall. There is also a cluster with terminals 
and personal computers in Groton to 
support the Southeastern campus activities. 
In addition, the system supports four 
Tektronix raster graphics terminals with 
plotter and printer; and a PC/MV8000 
connect for up/down loading files. Software 
includes FORTRAN 17, PASCAL, UNIX, C, 
APL, BASIC, COBOL, PL/1, RPG, DBMS, 
LISP, Word Processing, and a Spreadsheet; 



also SPSS and IMSL; also GKS and IGL 
graphics packages; also several financial 
data files, as well as simulation packages for 
engineering and business. 
Engineering Computation Laboratory 

The Computer Aided Engineering Center 
(CAEC) was designed to provide specialized 
hardware and software for the computer- 
intensive needs of large CAD and graphics 
software systems, for upper level 
engineering students and engineering 
faculty. The laboratory, located in Buckman 
Hall, houses 18 IBM-compatible AT-class 
PCs, a PRIME supermini computer, three 
Tektronix raster graphics terminals and 
printing and plotting devices. 

The PCs serve two functions; as 
independent workstations and as terminals 
to connect to the PRIME. Micro software 
includes Text Processing programs, Basic 
and Turbo Pascal programming languages, 
Math/Graphing programs. Drawing 
programs, and over 50 special purpose civil, 
chemical, electrical, mechanical and 
industrial engineering programs. 

The PRIME employs 32-bit ECL circuitry, 
96-bit arithmetic, and has 8 megabytes of 
main memory, 1.2 gigabytes of peripheral 
storage and is rated at 4 mips. Software 
includes PASCAL, FORTRAN 77, and C; 
also GKS, ANSYS, PATRAN, SPICE, and 
ASPEN. The PRIME is also tied into the 
university network so that terminals in any 
of the clusters including the Groton area can 
have access to the computer. 

Use of the academic system is offered to 
all faculty and students. Technical assistance 
is available in the User Services area of 
Echlin Hall and consists of student 'CC 
Aides' and full-time computer center staff, a 
complete set of manuals and extensive on- 
line HELP files. 

Athletic Complex 

The university's North Campus houses 
the gymnasium, with seating for 1,400 at 
sporting events, weight room, racquetball 
court and an exercise room. 

On the adjacent grounds are six tennis 
courts, a softball field, the Frank Vieira 
baseball field, and Robert B. Dodds 
Stadium, a combination football, lacrosse 
and soccer field, with seating for 3,500. 



Facilities 25 



Institute of Computer Studies 

The University of New Haven Institute of 
Computer Studies (ICS) is an academic 
organization merging people, ideas and 
resources to promote, enhance and support 
computer-related programs and activities at 
UNH. The institute complements and assists 
academic departments and other computing 
units at the university in promoting and 
developing innovative responses to 
emerging computing requirements. The 
institute also serves as a focal point for 
joining business and industry with the 
diverse education-related services, both 
credit and non-credit, of the university. 

The University of New Haven has 
fostered the multifaceted development of 
computer-related courses in its schools. 
Most faculty and students utilize some 
aspect of computing. The responsibilities 
which encompass the activities of the 
institute are to: 

• provide coordination for the university's 
many computer-related activities and 
insure long-range planning of computer 
resources; 

• provide and administer certain computer- 
related facilities and services, including a 
microcomputer lab; 

• assist industrial firms in assessing and 
satisfying their computer training 
requirements through the university's 
several divisions; 

• assist departments in offering non-credit 
courses in computer-related areas; 

• assist departments, when appropriate, in 
their development of new programs and 
courses; 

• assist in directing students to computer- 
related programs appropriate to their 
needs; 

• disseminate information concerning 
academic computing activities; 

• serve as institutional liaison for certain 
computer-related projects and 
associations; 

• promote technological and applications 
research. 

The institute offers free weekly student 
workshops on word-processing, 
spreadsheet, and database management 



software. The workshops give students 
public domain or shareware programs and 
training. 

Personal Computer Laboratories 

The institute maintains personal 
computer laboratories for the entire 
university community. Two labs are 
equipped with IBM-PC or PC-compatible 
computers with suitable storage, graphic 
and printing components to support most 
software products used in the classroom. A 
university-wide software directory indicates 
what programs are available for student 
use, many at Httle or no cost to the student. 

One laboratory is designed for classroom 
instruction. A color, large screen projector 
displays the contents of the instructor's 
screen onto a large screen located in the 
front of the classroom. The computers are 
AT-IBM PC compatible. 

Institute of Analytical and Environmental 
Chemistry 

The University of New Haven Institute of 
Analytical and Environmental Chemistry is 
an applied research facility with capabilities 
in three general areas of chemical and 
environmental analysis: sample analysis, 
property measurement and custom 
synthesis. Administered by the nonprofit 
UNH Foundation and headquartered in the 
university's School of Engineering, the 
institute is a state-certified laboratory for the 
analysis of various water pollutants. In 
addition, it is equipped to measure the 
physical properties, stability and 
environmental impact of specific pollutants. 
The institute also has the capability to 
synthesize compounds, suspected 
pollutants and products to establish 
identification standards. 

The institute is geared to accept specific 
projects, under contract, and perform the 
necessary research on a confidential basis 
using UNH equipment, laboratory facilities 
and staff. Clients most likely to seek these 
services include chemical companies, 
consulting firms, regulatory agencies and 
municipalities. 



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27 



ADMISSION 

AND 

REGISTRATION 



Robert Caruso, dean of admission 

services 
Laurie G. Saunders, director of 

undergraduate admissions 

Call toll-free: 1-800-DIAL-UNH 
(1-800-342-5864) 

The University of New Haven welcomes 
applications from men and women of all 
races, economic levels, religions and 
geographic areas. 

Students wishing to take any course in the 
university, whether or not they seek a 
degree, must first satisfy the admission 
requirements and follow the admission 
procedures specified below. In general, all 
applicants must have graduated from an 
accredited secondary school or passed the 
state high school equivalency examination 
to be considered for admission. 

Students should note that the different 
schools of the university may have 
additional admission requirements which 
are discussed in detail in subsequent pages 
of this catalog. 

You become a student of the University of 
New Haven only after you have completed 
the steps listed below under Admission 
Procedure, selected and registered for 
courses for your first semester, and made 
the appropriate tuition and fee payments. 



Admission Procedure — New 
Students/Freshmen 

• Secure an application form from the 
Admissions Office of the university or 
from your high school guidance 
counselor. 

• Submit the completed form with the 
non-refundable application fee. 

• Request your secondary school to 
forward an official copy of your 
academic transcript directly to the 
Admissions Office. If you are currently 
attending an educational institution and 
will be sending us an incomplete 
transcript, it is your responsibility to 
send us your final transcript as soon as 
it becomes available. 

• Arrange for results of Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT) or American 
College Testing Program (ACT) 
examinations to be sent directly to the 
Admissions Office. 

• A decision on your application will not 
be made until we receive: your 
completed application, your non- 
refundable application fee, your high 
school and college (if applicable) 
transcripts and your admission test 
scores. If necessary, recommendations 
and/or a personal interview may be 
requested. 



28 

Admission Procedure — 
Transfer Students 

The university admits transfer students 
for both fall and spring semesters. The 
procedure for transfer students to follow 
when applying to the university is: 

• Complete an admission application and 
return it to the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office with the non- 
refundable application fee. 

• Arrange to have official transcripts from 
all colleges/universities attended 
forwarded to the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office. 

• An official copy of your secondary 
school transcript, including date of 
graduation, must also be submitted. A 
satisfactory General Equivalency 
Diploma (GED) is acceptable in place of 
a high school diploma. 

• Students who have completed less than 
one full year (30 semester hours) of 
college level work must submit official 
test scores of the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) or American College Test 
(ACT). Students who have completed 
more than one full year of college level 
work are not usually required to submit 
standardized test scores. However the 
Admissions Office reserves the right to 
request this information if necessary. 

• In most cases, transfer students will 
receive a tentative transfer credit 
evaluation at the time of acceptance. To 
help expedite the evaluation procedure, 
we ask that you forward a current 
catalog from all institutions attended 
with your application materials. 

Admission Procedure — 
International Students 

The university admits international 
students for both fall and spring semesters. 
Official academic transcripts from all 
institutions previously attended, including 
secondary school, must accompany the 
admission application. Proficiency in 
English must be demonstrated. Freshman 
applicants must submit official reports of 
TOEFL scores. Students who have been 



educated in English-speaking systems may 
substitute the SAT or ACT for the TOEFL. 
Depending on their academic background, 
students transferring from accredited 
institutions within the United States may 
also be required to submit TOEFL scores. 
Verification of financial support also must 
accompany the admission application. 

Academically qualified applicants who do 
not meet the English language proficiency 
requirements can choose to complete an i 

intensive English program approved by the j 
University of New Haven. The university 
has agreements with the New Haven Adult 
Education Center (NHAEC), which is 
located one mile from our campus, and the 
ELS Language Center in Bridgeport which is 
located 17 miles from our campus. 

If a student chooses to attend either of 
these programs, one Certificate of Eligibility 
(1-20 or IAP-66) will be issued to include both 
English language training at NHAEC or ELS 
and undergraduate or graduate study at the 
University of New Haven. For more 
information about these programs, please 
contact the Coordinator of International 
Admissions. 

Admission Procedure — 
Division of Continuing 
Education 

The procedure for admission to the 
Division of Continuing Education is very 
similar to the Day Division procedure. It is 
handled through the Office of the Division 
of Continuing Education and can often be 
accomplished in one visit. 

The procedure for applying to the 
Division of Continuing Education is as 
follows: 

• Write or telephone the Division of 
Continuing Education to arrange for an 
interview. The telephone number is (203) 
932-723L 

• Secure an application and submit the form 
along with the non-refundable application 
fee. 

• Request your secondary school and/or 
previous colleges to forward copies of your 
official academic transcripts directly to the 
Division of Continuing Education. 



• Arrange to take the University of New 
Haven placement examinations in English 
comprehension and mathematics. 
Placement test results are used for 
registration purposes. 

• A decision on your application will not be 
made until we receive: your completed 
application, your non-refundable 
application fee, and your high school and 
college (if applicable) transcripts. 

Please see the Division of Continuing 
Education section of this publication for 
more detailed information. 

Conditional Admission 

There are a limited number of openings in 
the Day Division of the university for 
students who appear to have potential for 
academic success that has not been realized. 
At the discretion of the director of 
admissions, such students may be granted 
conditional admission to the university. 

In order to assist students to be successful, 
students granted conditional admission may 
be required to take certain courses designed 
to strengthen their foundation in basic skills 
and prepare them for regular college 
courses. Such students may also be limited 
to four courses during their first semester. 
See the developmental studies program 
section for more information. 

Placement 

Incoming students are placed in courses 
in English and mathematics according to 
their individual abilities as demonstrated 
through the university testing program, 
SAT scores and high school or previous 
college records. 

Some students may be placed in courses 
designed to upgrade their skills in particular 
subject areas and prepare them for more 
advanced courses at the university. 

Deferred Enrollment 

Students who are offered admission to the 
University of New Haven may choose to 
defer enrollment for up to one full year from 
the originally intended semester of 
entrance. Students may not enroll in college 



Admission and Registration 29 

level courses at another college or university 
during this time period. Students must 
notify the Admissions Office in writing prior 
to the beginning of the semester for which 
they were accepted if they intend to defer 
their enrollment. 



Registration 

Joseph Macionus, university registrar 

Registration is the process of selecting 
classes each term. Registration includes 
faculty advising, a preliminary choice of 
classes and fee payment. Final registration is 
not complete without these steps. 

Students have assigned faculty advisers 
who provide guidance on academic matters 
and help students with the registration 
process. Normally, the adviser is the 
chairman or coordinator of the student's 
major course of study or another faculty 
member designated by the chairman. 

There are two parts to registration: the 
completion of the registration forms and the 
payment of tuition. There is a penalty fee 
for delaying either of these two processes 
beyond the end of the registration period 
and/or tuition due date. 

Registration dates and procedures for 
currently enrolled day students will be 
posted in advance. A separate registration is 
required for each of the semesters, for 
summer sessions and for the winter 
intersession. 

All new students who have paid the 
acceptance fee will be mailed information 
about registration. Prior to the start of the 
fall and spring semesters, an orientation/ 
registration program is held at which time 
new students will select their courses. 

Social security numbers will be used on 
student records; students should be sure to 
bring their number when registering. 
Prospective students who do not have a 
social security number should apply for one 
before registration. Students from other 
countries who do not have social security 
numbers will be given a temporary number 
by the university; however, they are 
encouraged to apply for a social security 
number as soon as possible. 



30 

In conjunction with academic advisers, 
students are urged to plan their programs 
carefully before completing the registration 
forms in order to avoid the need for 
requesting changes. Once the registration is 
completed, students are charged the change 
of registration fee for each addition made. 
The fee is payable upon completion of the 
add form. 

Please Note: No new full-time day student 
will be permitted to register for classes until: 

1. The non-refundable acceptance fee has 
been paid. 

2. Tuition in full for the semester has been 
received. Students relying on financial 
aid to cover all or part of a semester's 
expenses must present evidence of the 
amount of money awarded. 

No new part-time evening student will be 
allowed to register for classes until tuition 
payment or financial aid arrangements have 
been made. 

Course Overload Restrictions: Day 
Students 

Day students who wish to register for 
more than 15 semester hours in any one 
semester must follow special procedures 
and guidelines. 

If the total number of courses to be 
attempted is 6 and is in excess of the hours 
specified on the student's worksheet, the 
student must obtain written permission 
from his or her adviser and department 
chairman and, in most instances, must have 
a cumulative quality point ratio of 3.20 or 
higher. 

If the total number of courses to be 
attempted is more than 6, the student must 
obtain written permission from his or her 
adviser and department chairman, academic 
dean, and the Provost's Office. Such 
students are required to have a cumulative 
quality point ratio of 3.20 or higher. 



Course Overload Restrictions: Evening and 
Southeastern Connecticut Students 

Evening and Southeastern Connecticut 
students are restricted to a maximum of 11 
credit hours in any given term or semester 
including the combined sessions of summer 
school. 

Students wishing to take more than 11 
credit hours per term or semester must 
complete the Internal Transfer Form in order 
to change student status to that of a full-time 
day student. Day Division tuition rates 
would then apply. 

In some limited circumstances, evening or 
Southeastern Connecticut students nearing 
graduation may be allowed to exceed the 11 
credit hour per term policy. Only students 
who satisfy the following criteria will be 
eligible: 

1. 12 or more credit hours must be needed 
for graduation and successful completion 
of the registered courses would enable 
graduation. 

2. Only courses required for graduation are 
included. 

3. Only Division of Continuing Education 
courses are being taken, unless a given 
course is unavailable in the evening. 

4. Division of Continuing Education status 
was continuously maintained during the 
previous semester. 

Students must apply for this credit 
overload by obtaining the appropriate form 
from the Division of Continuing Education 
and securing the approval of the department 
chairman and the dean of the School of 
Professional Studies and Continuing 
Education. 



33 



ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 



Ways of Earning Credit 

Academic Credit 

Transfer of Credit to the University 

Courses Available at Other Colleges 

Coordinated Course 

Advanced Placement 

Crediting Examinations 

Advanced Study 

Independent Study 

Air Force Reserve Officers Training 

Academic Status and Progress 

Full-time Students 

Part-time Students 

Matriculation 

Academic Worksheets 

Class 

Transfer of Student Status 

Major 

Minor 

Grading System 

Grade Reports 

Quality Point Ratio 

Satisfactory Progress 

Dean's List 

Probation and Dismissal 

Repetition of Work 

Dismissal/Readmission Procedure 

Readmission 



Changes 

Dropping/ Adding a Class 

Withdrawal from a Class 

Changing a Major 

Leave of Absence 

Withdrawal from the University 

Transfer of Credit from the University 

General Policies 

Academic Honesty 
Attendance Regulations 
Course Work Expectations 
Make-up Policy 

Graduation 

Graduation Criteria 
Residency Requirement 
Writing Proficiency Examination 
Honors 



34 

Ways of Earning Credit 

Academic Credit 

Academic credit is granted on a credit 
hour basis. In addition to successfully 
completing regular courses, students may 
earn credit by taking independent study, 
coordinated courses, crediting exams or 
CLEP exams or by transferring previously 
awarded credit from other institutions. 
These methods are detailed in the Academic 
Regulations section. 

Transfer of Credit to the University 

Students may transfer to the university 
after completing academic work at other 
institutions. Applications should be made to 
the Director of Undergraduate Admissions. 
If feasible, potential transfer students should 
visit the university and discuss their transfer 
credit situation with the chairman or dean 
administering the program of interest. 
Normally, the university accepts credit from 
regionally accredited colleges on an 
equivalency basis. The regional institutional 
accreditation bodies in the U.S. are: Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Schools, 
New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges, North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools, Northwest 
Association of Schools and Colleges, 
Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools, and Western Association of Schools 
and Colleges. 

Students transferring from another 
institution must possess at least a 2.00 
quality point ratio based on a four point 
scale. Credit is normally granted for those 
courses completed with at least a grade of C, 
or its equivalent. Credit transferred from a 
two-year institution is generally limited to 60 
credit hours, unless otherwise approved in 
writing by the dean of the school in which 
the student seeks to enroll. 

When a student's application is complete, 
a tentative analysis is made of transfer credit 
available. Then final decisions on transfer 
credit are made by department chairmen 
and must conform to school and university 
policies. Credit is not awarded officially until 
the student has completed at least 12 credits 
in good standing at UNH. Prospective 



students may be required to take qualifying 
or placement examinations for specific 
courses. 

Plans of study for a University of New 
Haven degree should be agreed upon by 
both the transfer student and the 
department early in the first term of 
attendance in order to avoid course 
duplication and academic discontinuity. 

For Transfer of Student Status, see 
following pages. 

Courses Available at Other Colleges 

University of New Haven students 
interested in taking courses at other colleges 
and universities should discuss this matter 
directly with their departments and consult 
the statement of policy established by the 
undergraduate school in which they are 
enrolled. 

Coordinated Course 

In order to maintain continuity in a degree 
program, students are encouraged to use 
UNH Summer Sessions and Winter 
Intersession; however courses taken by 
matriculated UNH students at regionally 
accredited institutions may be designated as 
"coordinated courses." Credit for such 
courses is accepted and posted on students' 
permanent records and the grades are 
included in students' quality point ratios. 

Prior authorization for a "coordinated 
course" designation must be obtained from 
both the departments housing the student's 
major and the analogous course at UNH. 
The appropriate form must be obtained at 
the Registrar's Office, approved, and 
returned to that office before the course in 
question begins. Normally, approval is only 
granted for those courses which are 
analogous to courses offered at UNH and/or 
are standard courses in a given discipline 
and which are unavailable at UNH because 
of frequency of offerings, cancellation, etc., 
or inaccessible to the student because of 
temporary residency at a distant location. 

Students must be continuously 
matriculated at UNH while taking a 
coordinated course. Approval for a 
coordinated course will become void upon 
withdrawal or dismissal of the student. 



Advanced Placement 

The university recognizes the program of 
advanced placement available to talented 
high school students and operated by the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 
Students satisfactorily completing advanced 
placement courses in high school and the 
final examination prepared by the 
Educational Testing Service (E.T.S.) may be 
given appropriate college credit if their 
courses are similar to those offered at the 
University of New Haven. 

Educational Testing Service Advanced 
Placement examinations are graded from 1 
to 5. Credit is allowed where the grade 
earned is 3, 4 or 5. Students desiring to 
submit advanced placement courses for 
college credit should have all results of these 
courses and tests sent in with their 
application to the Admissions Office. 

The University of New Haven accepts 
credit by examination from the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP). The passing 
percentile for CLEP and subject 
examinations is 50. Credit will be evaluated 
by the appropriate department chairman. 

Crediting Examinations 

A student who has at least a 2.00 
cumulative QPR and has independent 
knowledge of the content of an 
undergraduate course offered by the 
university may, with the approval of the 
respective department chairman and dean, 
take a special crediting examination in lieu 
of taking the course. 

Students are reminded that they must 
earn at least 30 semester hours through 
regular course work if they are to meet the 
residency requirements for graduation. 

Students may not take crediting 
examinations during the first or last 
semesters in which they are enrolled. 

Students should contact the Division of 
Continuing Education for latest 
developments in alternative credit routes for 
adults. 

Advanced Study 

Advanced study courses are offered to 
qualified students in the departments 
offering the degrees of bachelor of science or 



Academic Regulations 35 

bachelor of arts. These courses may include 
a thesis, tutorial work or independent study 
which permits the student to work 
intensively in areas of special interest. 

Independent Study 

In all courses of independent study, 
including internships, case studies, reading 
programs, practica, theses and work-study 
experiences, the student and an adviser 
must jointly file a project outline with the 
registrar within four weeks of the beginning 
of the course. This outline shall serve as the 
basis for determining satisfactory 
completion of course requirements. In the 
case of intensive or condensed course work, 
project outlines must be filed at least one 
week prior to the last day of the session. 

Normally, independent study is restricted 
to no more than six credits and only open to 
seniors, juniors and exceptionally qualified 
sophomores. Students must have at least a 
3.0 quality point ratio. 

Regularly scheduled courses, that is, 
those offered at least once every four 
semesters, are not normally acceptable as 
independent study. 

Students should contact the Division of 
Continuing Education for new develop- 
ments in alternative forms of independent 
study. 

Air Force Reserve Officers Training 

University of New Haven students are 
eligible to enroll in the Air Force Reserve 
Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) courses 
at the University of Connecticut. AFROTC 
courses introduce students to Air Force 
opportunities which lead to commissions as 
Air Force officers upon graduation. Air 
Force officers work as pilots, navigators, 
engineers, nurses, and in many other 
careers. Consequently, students with any 
major are encouraged to explore AFROTC 
options. AFROTC scholarships are available 
for eligible participants in this program. 

Academic Status and Progress 

Full-time Students 

Full-time student status is attained by 
registering for a minimum of 12 charge 



36 



credits per semester, or equivalent term, on 
either a matriculated or non-matriculated 
basis. Such status is continued to a 
succeeding term provided a minimum of 12 
credits are completed in the term of record. 
Completion is defined as receipt of a letter 
grade of A + through D — , F, S or U; other 
letter grades do not signify course 
completion. 

Full-time students are eligible for all 
daytime student activities and benefits, and 
are subject to Day Division tuition charges 
and other relevant fees. It is assumed that 
full-time students will select the great 
majority, if not all, of their courses from Day 
Division schedules, unless needed courses 
are unavailable in the Day Division. 

Part-time Students 

Students who register for two through 11 
charge credits during a semester maintain 
part-time status. Part-time status may be 
held in either the Day Division or the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

Matriculation 

Matriculation is the formal act of 
registering to study for a specific degree 
offered by the university. Matriculation is, 
therefore, not automatic. A student must 
request matriculation by seeking admission 
to a specific university degree program. 
Formal acceptance into a degree program 
shall constitute the granting of 
matriculation. 

Students seeking credit to be transferred 
to another institution, or who wish simply 
to audit courses or to take them without 
working toward a degree, need not 
matriculate. Non-matriculated students 
must register to take their chosen courses, 
however, and will be allowed to enroll in 
courses only as space permits. It is the 
student's responsibility to seek 
matriculation should he or she later decide 
to pursue a University of New Haven 
degree. 

Academic Worksheets 

Generally, matriculating students are and 
remain subject to those requirements 
defined in the undergraduate catalog and 



listed on the academic worksheet in effect 
for the semester of initial enrollment. 

If students change academic majors, they 
shall be subject to the requirements of the 
worksheet in effect at the time of the change. 

If students officially withdraw or are 
dismissed from the university and decide to 
return at a later date, they shall be subject to 
the requirements of the worksheet in effect 
at the time of their return. 

Part-time students are permitted a total of 
three semesters (consecutive or otherwise) 
break in study during which time they may 
continue on the original academic 
worksheet. After the three-semester limit 
has been reached, students will then be 
subject to the requirements of the new 
worksheet in effect at that time. 

If students initiate a leave of absence, they 
shall continue on the same worksheet upon 
return to the university at the conclusion of 
the leave. However, students who fail to 
return after the designated leave of absence 
period shall be considered withdrawn 
students and subject to the same 
requirements as outlined above. 

Students who begin their studies on 
worksheets which subsequently change 
may initiate a request to use the most current 
worksheet for that major. Students are not 
required to switch to the current worksheet. 

Class 

In order to be classified as a sophomore, a 
student must have completed 27 credit 
hours in an approved program; a junior, 57 
credit hours; a senior, 87 credit hours; a fifth- 
year student, 117 credit hours. 

Transfer of Student Status 

Undergraduate students are able to 
change their student status according to the 
following procedure: 

Day to Evening Transfer. Full-time day 
students who wish to become part-time 
evening students may do so by obtaining the 
Internal Transfer Form in the Registrar's 
Office. Upon approval, this form is then 
brought to the Division of Continuing 
Education for processing and registration of 
courses. 



Please note: Evening students are 
restricted to taking courses in the evening 
unless they are unavailable and may not 
exceed 11 credit hours per term. 

Evening to Day Transfer. Part-time 
evening students who desire to take more 
than 11 credit hours per term must become 
full-time day students. This process requires 
the student to obtain the Internal Transfer 
Form from the Division of Continuing 
Education. Upon approval, the form is then 
brought to the Registrar's Office for 
processing and registration of courses. 

Major 

Each matriculated student must designate 
a specific degree program, called a major. 
Major program requirements are detailed in 
the catalog under the relevant department 
listing. A cumulative 2.0 QPR in major 
courses is required for graduation. See 
program requirements for further clarifica- 
tion of specific courses /requirements. 

Minor 

Most academic programs have an 
associated minor program, which normally 
includes five or six courses. The university 
encourages students to augment their major 
program with an associated minor. Details 
can be obtained from the appropriate 
department. 

Grading System 

The following grading system is in use 
since September 1, 1987 and, except where 
otherwise specified, applies both to 
examinations and to term work. The weight 
of a final examination grade is a matter 
individually determined by each instructor. 
See Quality Point Ratio section following for 
additional information. 



A + 


— Excellent 


A 


— Excellent 


A- 


— Excellent 


B + 


— Good 


B 


— Good 


B- 


— Good 


C + 


— Fair 


c 


— Fair 



Academic Regulations 37 

C- —Fair 

D -I- — Poor 

D — Poor 

D — — Poor, lowest passing grade 

F — Failure 

AU — Audit. Indicates course was 

attended without expectation of 

credit or grade. 
I — Incomplete. Indicates one of the 

following two possibilities: 

1. Some work remains to be 
completed to gain academic credit 
for the course. An I is assigned in 
the first instance at the discretion 
of the instructor. This assignment 
shall not be automatic but shall be 
based upon an evaluation of the 
student's work completed up to 
that point and an assessment of 
the student's ability to complete 
course requirements within the 
allowed time limit. Work to 
remove an I must be performed 
within the 12 months following 
the last day of the semester in 
which the I is incurred or earlier if 
the instructor so requires. When 
such work is completed, the 
instructor will assign a final grade 
for the course. 

2. The student has failed to complete 
unfulfilled academic assignments 
within the specified 12 months, 
and the grade of I has been 
entered on the student's 
permanent transcript. No further 
opportunity to complete the 
course will be available to the 
student after this time. 

DNA — Did Not Attend. Indicates non- 
attendance in a course for which a 
student had previously registered 
but not officially dropped. 

W — Withdrawal. Indicates withdrawal 
from the course after the first half 
of the semester, or withdrawal 
from the university after the 
twelfth week of classes. The grade 
of W will not be assigned to any 
student who has taken the final 
examination in the course. 



38 
S 

U 



— Satisfactory. Given only in non- 
credit courses. 

— Unsatisfactory. Given only in non- 
credit courses. 



Grade Reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject 
will be mailed to the student soon after the 
close of each semester. The university will 
release grades to a student's employer upon 
request, but only if the student has given 
prior written authorization. 

Quality Point Ratio 

The academic standing of each student is 
determined on the basis of the quality point 
ratio earned each semester. The quality 
point ratio (QPR) is determined by using the 
quality points assigned to each student's 
grade. 

To determine the total number of quality 
points earned during a semester, each letter 
grade is assigned a quality point value: 



A + 

A 

A- 

B + 

B 

B- 

C + 

C 

C- 

D + 

D 

D- 

F 

I 

DNA 

W 

S 

u 



= 4.3 quality points 
= 4.0 quality points 
= 3.7 quality points 
= 3.3 quality points 
= 3.0 quality points 
= 2.7 quality points 
= 2.3 quality points 
= 2.0 quality points 
= 1.7 quality points 
= 1.3 quality points 
= 1.0 quality points 
= 0.7 quality points 
0.0 quality points 



= quality points 

= quality points 

= quality points 

= quality points 

= quality points 

The quality point value for each grade 
earned during a semester is multiplied by 
the number of credit hours assigned to that 
course as listed elsewhere in this catalog. 
The sum of these points is the total number 
of quality points earned during the 
semester. 

This sum is divided by the number of 
credit hours completed (hours from courses 
with grades of A + through D — , F, S or U) 
to obtain the quality point ratio. 



The cumulative quality point ratio is 
obtained by calculating the quality point 
ratio for all courses attempted at the 
University of New Haven. Course grades of 
AU, DNA, I, S, U and W are non-punitive 
grades. They are not calculated in the overall 
QPR since they carry no quality points. 

See the previous "Grading System" 
section for more information. 

Satisfactory Progress 

For students matriculated in the Day 
Division, satisfactory progress toward a 
degree is defined as successful completion 
of 24 credits applicable to that degree 
program during an academic year. This 
should include registration for at least 12 
credits per semester and successful 
completion of at least nine credits per 
semester. "Completion" is defined as the 
receipt of a final letter grade (A + to F) but 
not the receipt of a Withdrawal (W) or an 
Incomplete (I). "Successful completion" is 
defined as the receipt of a passing letter 
grade (A+ to D — ). Decisions on student 
status are made by the university registrar. 

Students are required to maintain a 
minimum cumulative quality point ratio in 
accordance with the following scale: 

Quality point ratio of 1.50 for 3 to 30 

credit hours attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.60 for 31 to 45 

credit hours attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.70 for 46 to 60 

credit hours attempted 
Quahty point ratio of 1.80 for 61 to 75 

credit hours attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.90 for 76 to 90 

credit hours attempted 
Quality point ratio of 2.00 for 91 or more 

credit hours attempted 

Appeals involving extenuating 
circumstances may be addressed to the 
chairman of the Faculty Senate for resolution 
by appropriate Faculty Senate committees. 

Dean's List 

The dean's list honors students who 
demonstrate excellence in their academic 
performance. Full-time students who earn a 
quality point ratio of 3.50 or better in any one 



semester will be appointed to the dean's list 
for that semester. 

Part-time students who have accumulated 
a minimum of 14 credit hours of course work 
at the university will automatically be 
considered for the dean's list at the end of 
each semester. A cumulative quality point 
ratio of 3.50 or better is required. 

Probation and Dismissal 

Failure to maintain satisfactory progress 
as defined below will place students on 
academic probation for the following 
semester of enrollment. Students are 
automatically dismissed when they receive 
a third probation (or, if readmitted from a 
previous dismissal, any subsequent 
probation) or when their quality point ratio 
for any one semester is less than 1.0. 

First-semester freshmen earning a quality 
point ratio less than 1.0 are automatically 
referred to the Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee which may specify 
conditions for continued enrollment. A 
record of committee action shall appear on 
the student's permanent record. 

Students who fail to maintain the 
minimum QPR for satisfactory progress, but 
are not dismissed, are placed on academic 
probation. Probation serves as a warning 
that lack of improvement will eventually 
prevent satisfaction of graduation 
requirements. Because UNH is very 
concerned that probationary students 
become successful, counselors are assigned 
to assist such students. 

Students on probation are normally 
limited to four courses during the term of 
their probationary status. They may also be 
required to retake courses in which they 
performed poorly. The university may void 
a registration for more than four courses. 
Also any courses above the four course limit 
taken at another institution during a period 
of probation will not be accepted in transfer 
to UNH. 

Academic probation of transfer students is 
determined in accordance with the same 
graduated, minimum cumulative quality 
point ratio scale as for non-transfer students 
detailed above. In determining a transfer 
student's academic standing, the student's 



Academic Regulations 39 

total semester hours completed — those 
transferred from other colleges plus those 
received at the University of New Haven — 
are applied to the minimum cumulative 
quality point ratio scale. 

Repetition of Work 

A course which a student has completed 
may be repeated only with the consent of 
the chairman of the department which offers 
the course. If a student achieves a higher 
grade in the second attempt, that grade 
rather than the first will be used to compute 
the cumulative quality point ratio. However, 
both the higher and lower grades in the 
course remain in the student's permanent 
record. 

When credit for a graded course 
previously attempted at UNH is earned 
through a method which does not carry a 
grade with a quality point value, the 
previous instance of that course will be 
removed from the cumulative QPR 
calculation. However, both instances will be 
recorded on the student's permanent record 
and transcript. 

Dismissal/Readmission Procedure 

Students are dismissed from the 
university at the end of each semester or 
trimester on the basis of the criteria listed in 
"Probation and Dismissal." Notification is 
made by the Registrar via registered letter. 
This letter will specify the time span for 
appeal (normally five days) and the criteria 
for appeal. 

Upon request by the student, an appeal 
will be heard by the Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee. If the appeal has 
merit and is granted, the student will be so 
notified by the Dean of Admission Services. 
The committee may require special 
arrangements or conditions to allow the 
student to continue. Satisfaction of such 
conditions would be a priority obligation for 
the student. 

If there is no appeal or if an appeal is 
denied, the student will be removed from 
any pertinent class rolls and will be 
prohibited from taking any courses at UNH 
for at least one semester or trimester. The 
student may continue in any intersession or 



40 

summer course which began before the date 
of dismissal, but may not start any courses 
after dismissal is effective. Dismissal action 
will be noted on the student's academic 
transcript. 

If the grades and /or credits from 
previous incomplete courses or from in 
progress intersession or summer courses 
change a student's dismissal or 
probationary status, the student will 
immediately be reevaluated in light of the 
new, overall cumulative record. 

At the end of the dismissal period, the 
student may apply for readmission through 
the appropriate admission office. Refer to 
the section on "Readmission" below. 

Readmission 

Application for readmission after students 
have been dismissed normally will be 
considered only after the lapse of a semester 
and only when students provide evidence 
which indicates probable success if 
readmitted. 

Unusual circumstances may permit earlier 
application if a student's dean and 
department chairman successfully petition 
the Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee to review the applicant's case. 

Requests for readmission should be 
submitted in writing to the Dean of 
Admission Services for transfer to the 
chairman of the Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee at least three weeks 
before the opening of the semester, and 
should include evidence supporting the 
student's belief that he or she will succeed if 
readmitted. 

A student who has been absent from the 
university for one or more semesters must 
submit a new application and pay another 
apphcation fee. If the student has attended 
another college or university an official 
academic transcript is required from that 
institution. Following the receipt of the 
above material, action will be taken on the 
application for readmission. Since the 
student is not matriculated at UNH during 
this period, no coordinated courses will be 
accepted. 

Readmission is not automatic. The 
Academic Standing and Admissions 



Committee reviews each application and 
makes a decision on acceptance, rejection or 
conditional acceptance of students. 

A student who is academically dismissed 
and readmitted by the Academic Standing 
and Admissions Committee may be 
prohibited from continuing with the 
academic program in which he/she was 
enrolled at the time of the dismissal. If the 
Committee readmits the student to a new 
program, the student shall have the same 
automatic right to enrollment in that 
program as any other newly admitted 
student. 

Changes 

Dropping/Adding a Class 

Students who wish to make a change in 
class schedule must complete a "Drop Slip" 
or an "Add Slip" or both. These are available 
from the Registrar's Office. All "Adds" 
require approval of the instructor and the 
student's adviser. A fee will be charged for 
adding courses after the announced 
deadline. 

The last date to add classes is one week 
into the semester, and is listed in the 
academic calendar. No classes may be added 
after this date without special approval from 
the instructor, the department and the dean. 
All changes should be completed prior to the 
second week of class so that students may be 
properly registered in the correct sections. 

Withdrawal from a Class 

Students desiring to withdraw formally 
from a class may do so before the last day to 
drop courses published in the academic 
calendar. Formal withdrawal removes the 
student's name from the class roll and 
removes the course hsting from the 
student's record and transcript. The student 
must obtain a "Drop" card from the 
Registrar's Office, complete it and sign it. 
Signatures of the instructor and the 
student's academic adviser must be 
obtained. The card is then returned to the 
Registrar's Office. 

Students withdrawing from a class after 
the last day to drop courses will receive a 
grade of W, which will appear with the 



course name on the student's record and 
transcript. 

Filing a "Drop" slip does not qualify the 
student for cancellation of any university 
tuition or fee. 

Changing a Major 

Students wishing to make a change in 
major or program must meet with the 
chairman of the department into which they 
wish to transfer. In consultation with the 
student, the chairman will prepare a change 
of major form and forward it to the 
Registrar's Office. 

Leave of Absence 

Matriculated students may interrupt 
continuous enrollment by electing to take a 
leave of absence from the university. The 
purposes may be for medical or personal 
reasons, to pursue a program of study at 
another institution or to engage in other off- 
campus educational experiences without 
severing their connection with the 
University of New Haven through 
withdrawal. Before taking a leave of 
absence, students are encouraged to discuss 
their particular situation with an academic 
adviser, the dean of their school, the Dean 
for Student Life, or a counselor in the 
Counseling Center. 

The rules regarding leaves of absence are: 

• All non-international students must file for 
a leave of absence through the Counseling 
Center; international students must 
initiate the leave of absence through the 
International Services Office. 

• The Counseling Center must receive 
clearance from the Bursar and the Dean for 
Student Life for all leaves of absence. 

• Students who are on university 
disciplinary probation are not eligible for a 
leave of absence. 

• A student who has been dropped or 
dismissed from the university for 
disciplinary or academic reasons is not 
eligible for a leave of absence until 
properly reinstated. 

• A student who has withdrawn as a degree 
candidate is not eligible for a leave of 
absence. If a student withdraws while on 
leave of absence, the leave is invalidated. 



Academic Regulations 41 

• Leaves are not required or granted for 
summer periods alone. 

• Normally, leaves are not approved for a 
period longer than two semesters. Under 
special circumstances, a leave of absence 
may be approved for a maximum of four 
semesters or two years. 

• If a student wishes to return later than the 
semester originally stated on the leave of 
absence form, the person must apply for 
an extension of his/her leave of absence 
through the Counseling Center, not to 
exceed the maximum period as outlined 
above. 

• A student who plans to enroll for course 
work at another accredited institution 
during a leave of absence should review 
program plans with his or her academic 
department adviser to verify eligibility for 
receiving credit at the University of New 
Haven. 

• Taking a leave of absence may affect a 
student's financial aid. All students 
receiving financial aid are encouraged to 
contact the Financial Aid Office before 
taking a leave of absence. 

• A student who fulfills the conditions of an 
approved leave of absence may return to 
the university and register for classes 
without applying for readmission; the 
student may preregister for the semester 
in which he/she plans to return. 

• All applications for leaves of absence after 
the twelfth week of classes must be 
approved by the Provost's Office before 
they are considered final. 

• For leaves of absence completed during 
the first 12 weeks of the semester, the 
student's transcript will contain no record 
of courses attempted or grades received 
during that semester. 

• Leaves of absences completed and 
approved after the twelfth week of the 
semester result in the receipt of the grade 
of "W" for all courses in which the student 
is registered at the time of taking the leave 
of absence. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students desiring to withdraw from the 
university must complete the necessary 
form at the Counseling Center and notify 



42 

each of their instructors. It is the student's 
obligation to complete this formal 
procedure. Failure to do so leaves the 
student liable for all of the current semester's 
tuition and fees, and may result in grades of 
F being assigned in the student's courses. 

Formal withdrawal must be completed 
during the first four weeks of the semester 
in order to obtain any cancellation of tuition 
and fees (as described in this catalog) unless 
there are clearly extenuating circumstances 
and a formal appeal is made through the 
Counseling Center. 

Formal withdrawal which is completed at 
any time during the first 12 weeks of the 
semester will assure that the student's 
transcript will contain no record of courses 
attempted or grades received during that 
semester. 

Formal withdrawal which is completed 
after the twelfth week of the semester will 
result in the receipt of the grade of W for all 
courses in which the student is registered at 
the time of withdrawal. Students should 
note that formal withdrawal after the twelfth 
week cannot be regarded as complete 
unless, in addition to the above 
requirements, it has been approved by the 
Provost's Office. 

Because of the serious ramifications of 
formal withdrawal from the university, 
students contemplating this action should 
discuss the matter with their adviser or a 
counselor as soon as problems are 
perceived. 

Involuntary Administrative Withdrawal 

A student will be subject to involuntary 
administrative withdrawal from the 
university, or from university housing, if 
after evaluation by a Counseling Center or 
Health Service professional, or their 
designee, and after a withdrawal hearing, it 
is determined that the student is suffering 
from either a physical disorder and/or a 
mental disorder, and as a result of this 
disorder: 

(a) engages or threatens to engage, in 
behavior which poses a danger of 
causing physical harm to themselves or 
to others or 



(b) engages, or threatens to engage, in 
behavior which would cause significant 
property damage or directly and 
substantially impede the lawful activities 
of others. 
These standards do not preclude removal 
from the university, or university housing, 
in accordance with provisions of the student 
judicial system, residence hall occupancy 
agreement and related rules, regulations 
and publications of the university. 

The procedures which will be followed in 
the case of an involuntary administrative 
withdrawal are outlined in the Student 
Handbook. 

Transfer of Credit from the 

University 

Credits may be transferred from the 
University of New Haven, a fully accredited 
university, to any other college or university 
merely by obtaining a letter of authorization 
from the school to which the transfer of 
credit is desired. 

General Policies 

Academic Honesty 

Academic dishonesty is not tolerated at 
the University of New Haven. All students 
are responsible for reading and 
understanding the statement on academic 
honesty in the Student Handbook. 

Violation of university standards for 
academic honesty, including plagiarism, 
will be a sufficient reason for an F in the 
course and will be reported to the Dean for 
Student Life. A second violation may be 
cause for expulsion from the university. 

Plagiarism is defined as the 
unacknowledged use of another person's 
work or the submission of the same work for 
more than one course without expressed 
written permission in advance. 

Attendance Regulations 

Every student is expected to attend all 
regularly scheduled class sessions. Specific 
course attendance guidelines are established 
by the academic departments or each 
individual faculty member. 



From time to time, it may become 
necessary for the university to compile 
attendance records for every course in order 
to meet the needs of regulatory agencies, 
accrediting bodies or for other purposes. 

A maximum of two weeks of absences will 
be permitted for illness and emergencies. 
The instructor has the right to dismiss from 
the course any student who has been absent 
more than the maximum classes allowed. 
Please refer to the Student Handbook for 
further clarification of attendance 
requirements. 

Course Work Expectations 

All full-time and part-time students are 
expected to spend at least two hours of time 
on academic studies outside of and in 
addition to each hour of class time. This 
expectation should be used by the student 
as a guide in determining how much time to 
spend on academic studies outside of class. 
It should be used by the student, in 
consultation with his/her academic adviser, 
to help determine the student's course load 
each semester, so that the course load 
matches the amount of time available for 
academic studies. 

Make-up Policy 

Make-up examinations are a privilege 
extended to students at the discretion of the 
instructor, who may grant make-up 
examinations to those students who miss an 
examination as the result of a medical 
problem or a personal emergency. On the 
other hand, the instructor may simply 
choose to adopt a "no make-up" policy. If an 
instructor does choose to offer a make-up 
test, he/she has two options: 1) to use 
university proctors, if available, in which 
case the student must pay a make-up exam 
fee for regular semester examinations and 
for final examinations; 2) to make private 
arrangements to offer the examination, in 
which case the make-up exam fee is charged 
at the instructor's discretion. 

Graduation 

Graduation Criteria 

Matriculated students are required to 
petition the Registrar for graduation in the 



Academic Regulations 43 

term immediately preceding their 
anticipated commencement. Forms, 
schedules and graduation fees are published 
each term by the Registrar. 

Graduation is not automatic. Petitions, 
once filed, ensure that a student's record will 
be formally assessed in terms of degree 
requirements, and that it will be submitted 
to the faculty for final approval. A petition 
may be denied by the Registrar if graduation 
requirements are not met. If a petition is 
approved, a degree will be awarded at the 
appropriate commencement. Only those 
students who have successfully completed 
the graduation requirements listed below 
can participate in the commencement 
ceremonies. 

A degree will be conferred by the Board of 
Governors when a student has satisfied all 
program requirements and has met the 
following university requirements: 

1. successfully petitioned the Registrar 
and paid all graduation fees; 

2. earned a cumulative quality point ratio 
of no less than 2.0 in all courses 
applicable toward the degree; 

3. earned a cumulative quality point ratio 
of no less than 2.0 (or higher if required 
by individual department) in all 
courses in the student's major field of 
study; 

4. passed the university's Writing 
Proficiency Examination; 

5. been recommended by the faculty; 

6. met all financial and other obligations 
and conformed to any local, state or 
federal law concerning graduation, 
and; 

7. met the residency requirement of the 
university. 

Residency Requirement 

The residency requirement of the 
university is 30 credit hours taken at West 
Haven or at one of the university's off- 
campus centers. This requirement applies to 
all degrees, undergraduate and graduate. 

To ensure depth of study, the residency 
requirement must include 12 credit hours of 
work in the declared major for an associate 
degree, and 18 credit hours for a bachelor's 
degree. Exceptions may be granted only by 
the dean administrating the major. 



44 

Writing Proficiency Examination 

Because the University of New Haven 
believes that good writing skills are essential 
for success, it requires all its undergraduate 
students to demonstrate such skills before it 
will confer a bachelor's degree. 

All students must pass the university's 
Writing Proficiency Examination as a 
requirement for graduation. No student will 
be eligible to receive the B.A. or B.S. degree 
unless this examination is passed. All 
students must take this examination during 
the first semester after the completion of 57 
credit hours. Failure to take the examination 
may preclude continuous registration. 

The examination will consist of the writing 
of an impromptu theme on one of several 
topics of current interest. If the student's 
syntax, punctuation, and diction are in 
accord with the conventions of standard 
English and if the argument or exposition is 
clear and coherent, he/she will pass. If the 
student's writing is found to be deficient in 
these respects, notice of the unsatisfactory 
performance on the examination will be sent 
to the student and to his/her academic 
adviser. 

Students who fail the examination must 
take it again each subsequent semester in 
which they are enrolled until the 
examination is passed. Those who fail are 
encouraged: 1) to enroll in E250, Expository 
Writing; or 2) to utilize the services of the 
Center for Learning Resources; or 3) to do 
both, to help them to improve their writing 
proficiency. Passing E250 and/or utilizing 
the Center for Learning Resources does not 
satisfy the university writing proficiency 
requirement. In no case shall the 
requirements for a four-year degree be 
completed unless the Writing Proficiency 
Examination has been passed. 

Honors 

Honors may be conferred upon 
candidates for graduation according to the 
following standards: 

1. An associate degree With Honors is 
awarded to students who have a 



quality point ratio of 3.25 for the credit 
hours specifically required for the 
degree program from which they are 
being graduated and who have taken 
30 or more hours of required work at 
this university. 

2. An associate degree With High Honors 
is awarded to students who have a 
quality point ratio of 3.50 for the credit 
hours specifically required for the 
degree program from which they are 
being graduated and who have taken 
30 or more hours of required work at 
this university. 

3. The bachelor's degree Cum Laude is 
awarded to students graduating with a 
cumulative quality point ratio of at least 
3.50, who have taken 60 or more credit 
hours of required work at UNH and 
who have completed all the suggested 
courses within their curriculum. 

4. The bachelor's degree Magna Cum 
Laude is awarded to students 
graduating with a cumulative quality 
point ratio of at least 3.70, whose 
quality point ratio in all courses 
counting toward their major is at least 
3.70, who have taken 60 or more credit 
hours of required work at UNH, and 
who have completed all the suggested 
courses within their curriculum. 

5. The bachelor's degree Summa Cum 
Laude is awarded to students 
graduating with a cumulative quality 
point ratio of at least 3.90, whose 
quality point ratio in all courses 
counting toward their major is at least 
3.90, who have taken 60 or more credit 
hours of required work at UNH, and 
who have completed all the suggested 
courses within their curriculum. 

In determining eligibility for degrees with 
honor, transfer credit, credits earned by 
crediting examination and electives in excess 
of those required will not be considered. 
Only the cumulative quality point ratio for 
courses completed at the University of New 
Haven is considered in determining a 
student's eligibility for honors. 



47 



TUITION, 
FEES AND 
EXPENSES 



The tuition and other expenses listed in 
this section reflect the charges for the 1990- 
91 academic year. 

Day Division students taking courses 
offered during the evening will still pay the 
Day Division tuition rate for the first 18 
credits per semester. Division of Continuing 
Education students may take one course 
offered during the day at the Continuing 
Education tuition rate. 



*Note: The international student fee is 
required of all international undergraduate 
and graduate students. It supports a variety 
of services and programs for international 
students including: orientation programs, 
cross-cultural workshops, community 
activities, international alumni programs, 
library subscriptions to international 
newspapers and magazines, and the 
International Services office. 
**Note: The student activity fee is 
distributed by the Day Student Government 
and covers the cost of student-supported 
services such as the newspaper and radio 
station and helps defray the expenses of 
clubs, organizations, social activities, etc. 



Undergraduate Day Division 
1990-91 

Application Fee $25 

Payable with student's application 
to the university. 

Acceptance Fee 

Payable by all new students 
(incoming freshmen, transfer and 
former students) upon notification 
of acceptance, not refundable. 

International Student Fee* 

Tuition, 1990-91, Full-time Per 

Students Semester Year 

Full-time students taking 

12-18 credit hours. $4,475 $8,950 

Students taking fewer than 

12 credit hours, tuition per 

credit hour, $298 

Students taking 19 or more 

credit hours, additional 

tuition for each credit hour 

over 18, $178 

Student Activity Fee** $ 60 $ 120 

Student Health Insurance $ 50 $ 50 



$50 



$100 
Per 



Total tuition and fees 



$4,585 $9,120 



48 



Registration Late Fee $25 

Late Payment Fees 

Assessed for failure to complete 
payment of tuition, meal plan or 
residence charge by due date listed 
on academic calendar in this 
catalog. $50 

Additional fee for failure to 
complete payment of tuition, meal 
plan or resident charges by the first 
day of classes. $25 

Additional fee of 1-1/2 percent per 
month on the unpaid balance after 
the first day of classes. 

Undergraduate Division of 
Continuing Education 1990-91 

Application Fee 

Payable with the student's 
application to the university, not 
refundable. $10 

Tuition, 1990-91 

Evening students taking up to 11 

credit hours, per credit hour. $178 

Tuition Late Fee 

Fifty percent of the tuition for a 

Division of Continuing Education 

student is due when registering, 

the other 50 percent due by the first 

day of class. After this, the student 

must pay 1-1/2 percent per month 

on the unpaid balance. $25 

Tuition for Summer Session and 

Winter Intersession 

All students, both day and 
evening, pay per credit hour for 
summer session and winter 
intersession courses. $178 

Tuition, UNH in Southeastern 

Connecticut 

Students at UNH in Southeastern 

Connecticut are part of the Division 

of Continuing Education and pay 

per credit hour. $178 



Room Fees 
1990-91 

Per Per 
Semester Year 

Freshman Residence Hall $1,330 $2,660 
Upperclassmen Residence 
Halls 
Three people or more $1,330 $2,660 
Two people $1,490 $2,980 

Activity Fee $ 20 $ 40 

Intersession/Summer 
Session $ 85 

per week 
Room Reservation Fee $ 150 

Damage Deposit $ 150 

Board Fees 
1990-91 
Plan A 26,500 points 

(averages 18 meals 

plus snacks/week) $ 920 $1,840 
Plan B 20,000 points 

(averages 12-14 

meals/week) $ 790 $1,580 

PlanC 13,500 points $ 600 $1,200 

PlanD 7,500 points $ 370 $ 740 

Note: Meal Plan A or B is mandatory for all 
freshman students. 

Other Fees 

Change of Registration Fee 

Assessed for each course or section 
addition after the completion of 
registration. $5 

Laboratory Fees 

Payable each semester by students 
registering for courses requiring 
the laboratory fee as listed in the 
catalog. Non-refundable fees are 
announced in printed course 
schedules in advance of each 
semester. 

Make-up Test 

Assessed when a student is 

permitted to make up an 

announced test. $7 



Make-up Examination 

Assessed when a student is 
permitted to take an end-of- 
semester examination at a time 
other than the scheduled time, 
except for conflicts caused by the 
examination schedule. $10 

Co-op Program 

Students participating in the 
university's cooperative education 
program pay a continuing 
registration fee for semesters 
during which they work. $100 

Crediting Exam 
Assessed when a student is 
permitted to take crediting 
examination for a 3-credit course. $150 

Auditing a Course 

Students pay the same tuition and 
fees for auditing a course as they 
pay when the course is taken for 
credit. 

Graduation 
Assessed regardless of 
participation in exercises; no 
reduction will be made for non- 
attendance. For graduation in June, 
the fee and graduation petition are 
due no later than March 1 of the 
year of graduation; for January 
commencement, the fee and 
graduation petition are due before 
October 15 of the prior calendar 
year. Failure to meet the deadline 
date will result in a late charge of 
$50 in addition to the normal 
graduation fee, to be paid if there is 
sufficient time to process the 
graduation petition. If processing is 
not possible, graduation will be 
postponed to the next award date. $50 

Graduation refiling/diploma 
replacement fee 

This fee is paid to the university to 

refile for graduation if the student 

petitioned and failed to complete 

the requirements prior to the 

expected graduation date or the fee 

is paid to the university to replace 

a lost or damaged diploma. $35 



Tuition, Fees and Expenses 49 

Transcript of Academic Work 

No charge for first copy; thereafter, 

per copy. $4 

Payments 

Tuition, fees and other charges are 
payable when due. Checks or money orders 
should be made payable to the University of 
New Haven. There is a penalty charge of $7 
per check for all checks returned by the 
payer's bank. 

The university withholds all issuance of 
grades, the awarding of diplomas, the 
issuance of transcripts, and the granting of 
honorable dismissal to any student whose 
account is in arrears. 

As a convenience to those who desire to 
spread their payments out over the period 
of a semester, a deferred payment bank loan 
plan is available to full-time students and to 
part-time students carrying six or more 
semester hours or the equivalent. Details 
and forms for this plan are available at the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Application for this plan must be made 
prior to the first day of each semester. 
Adult Student Line of Credit 

Under a special agreement with local 
Connecticut banks, the university, through 
its Division of Continuing Education, 
subsidizes interest rates for part-time 
students' tuition charges. Upon credit 
approval, a "revolving charge" account is 
established which spreads tuition costs over 
a 12-month period. The account may be 
used for all semesters and trimesters, 
including summers, accumulating charges 
up to a preset maximum established by the 
bank. There is no prepayment penalty, and 
the university contributes 7 percent of the 
interest rate normally charged for similar 
credit accounts. 

Tuition Refund Policy 

After a formal withdrawal request is 
initiated by undergraduate day students at 
the Counseling Center or through the Office 
of the Division of Continuing Education for 
evening students, tuition is refunded or 
cancelled according to the following scale: 



50 



Date of Receipt Percentage 

of Withdrawal Request Cancelled 

1st week of semester 80% 

2nd week of semester 60% 

3rd week of semester 40% 

4th week of semester 20% 

After the 4th week 0% 

A prorated refund, rather than a refund 
based on the above mentioned scale, may be 
made in situations involving clearly 
extenuating circumstances such as 
protracted illness of a student. All appeals 
for a prorated refund based on extenuating 
circumstances must be made in writing and 
include documentation of the extenuating 
circumstances. Appeals are to be sent to the 
Director of Counseling and Health Services; 
and prorated refunds will be determined by 
the Committee on Withdrawals. All requests 
for refunds should be initiated before the 
close of the semester of withdrawal. Any 
student under the age of 18 must have the 
written consent of a parent or guardian 
indicating to whom any refund, if 
applicable, is to be paid in order to withdraw 
from the university. 
Summer Sessions and Intersession 

In cases of withdrawal from a course or 
courses within the first week of each term, a 
refund of 50 percent of tuition is made. 
There is no refund of summer or intersession 
tuition after the first week. 

The foregoing policy is intended to protect 
the university, since the university plans its 
expenses and bases its budget upon full 
collection of tuition and fees from all 
registered students, and assumes the 
obligation of supplying instruction and 
other services throughout the year. 

Residence Hall Refund Policy 

The 1990-91 Residence Hall Refund Policy is 
as follows: 

New Students 

1) The $150 room reservation fee is 
required upon return of the signed 
housing agreement to reserve a bed on 
campus. 

2) The $150 room reservation fee is non- 
refundable and will be applied to the 
spring semester housing charges. 



3) If a new student withdraws between 
August 1 and September 3, 1990 he/she 
will not be billed for housing charges. 

4) If a new student withdraws on or after 
September 4, 1990, or January 22, 1991, 
he/she will be billed for the fall or spring 
semester housing fees. 

5) If a new student has paid housing fees 
and does not attend the university, the 
housing fees will be non-refundable 
after September 4, 1990 and January 22, 
1991. 

6) If a new student does not pay for 
housing and does not attend the 
university, he/she will forfeit the $150 
room reservation fee. 

7) The housing agreement is binding for 
the 1990-91 academic year. Students 
who cancel their housing agreement for 
the spring semester and remain 
enrolled for the spring semester will be 
billed for the spring semester housing 
charges. 

8) If the student officially withdraws or 
takes a leave of absence from the 
university by January 11, 1991, he/she 
will not be charged for the spring 
semester housing fees but will forfeit the 
$150 room reservation fee. 

9) If the student officially withdraws or 
takes a leave of absence from the 
university between January 14-22, 1991, 
he/she will be billed for 50 percent of the 
housing charges. 

10) Students who withdraw from housing 
on or after January 23, 1991 will be billed 
for the spring semester housing 
charges. 

11) Students who are dismissed academ- 
ically or for disciplinary reasons 
between semesters will forfeit the $150 
room reservation fee. 

Current Resident Students 

1) $100 lottery participation deposit is 
required payable at the Business Office 
prior to the lottery: 

a) fee is non-refundable 

b) fee is deducted from spring 1991 
housing charges. 

2) If the student withdraws from housing 
between the room selection lottery and 



July 31, 1990, the $100 lottery 
participation deposit is forfeited and the 
student will not be charged for housing. 

3) If the student withdraws from housing 
but remains enrolled as a student 
between August 1, 1990 and 
September 3, 1990, he/she will be 
charged for 50 percent of the fall 
semester housing fees. 

4) If the student withdraws from housing 
but remains enrolled as a student on or 
after September 4, 1990, he/she will be 
charged for the fall semester housing 
fees. 

5) The housing agreement is binding for 
the 1990-91 academic year. Students 
who cancel their housing agreement for 
the spring semester and remain 
enrolled for the spring semester will be 
billed for the spring semester housing 
charges. 

6) If the student officially withdraws or 
takes a leave of absence from the 
university by January 11, 1991, he/she 
will not be charged for the spring 
semester housing fees but will forfeit the 
$100 lottery participation deposit. 

7) If the student officially withdraws or 
takes a leave of absence from the 
university between January 14-22, 1991, 
he/she will be billed for 50 percent of the 
housing charges. 

8) Students who withdraw from housing 
on or after January 23, 1991 will be billed 



Tuition, Fees and Expenses 51 

for the spring semester housing 
charges. 
9) Students who are dismissed academ- 
ically or for disciplinary reasons 
between semesters will forfeit the $100 
lottery participation deposit. 

10) Students who complete graduation 
requirements in December will have the 
$100 lottery participation deposit 
refunded. 

11) The housing agreement is binding for 
students who complete graduation 
requirements for an associate degree in 
January and continue as full-time 
students for the spring semester. 

Note: Fall and spring room charges are due 
at the same time as tuition and fees. 
Withdrawals from housing must be 
done in writing to the Office of 
Residential Life and must be 
postmarked by the above deadlines. 

Changes in Arrangements 

The university reserves the right to make, 
at any time, whatever changes in admission 
requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
instructors, regulations and academic 
programs it deems necessary prior to the 
start of any class, term, semester, trimester 
or session. The university reserves the right 
to divide, cancel or reschedule classes or 
programs if enrollment or other factors so 
require. 



FINANQAL 
AID 



53 



Jane C. Sangeloty, director 

The University of New Haven offers a 
comprehensive financial aid program, with 
students receiving assistance in the form of 
grants, scholarships, student loans and part- 
time employment. Funds are available from 
federal and state governments, private 
sponsors and from university resources. 
More than 60 percent of the university's full- 
time undergraduate students receive some 
form of financial assistance. 

Most financial aid awards are based on an 
individual applicant's demonstration of 
need. Some funds are available on a merit- 
basis for students who have exceptional 
academic records or athletic ability. Need- 
based awards are available only to U.S. 
citizens or eligible non-citizens. 

Financial aid award decisions are made 
after a careful consideration of a student's 
application for assistance. The Financial Aid 
Office attempts to consider all aspects of a 
student's financial circumstances in 
calculating need and attempts to meet the 
full need of aid applicants through a 
"package" of assistance, generally including 
a combination of grants, loans and 
employment. 

Students interested in applying for 
financial aid are encouraged to do so as early 
as possible. Since undergraduates are 
admitted on a rolling basis, financial aid 
award decisions for new students are also 
made on a rolling basis up to the beginning 
of the academic year. Returning, upperclass 
students must submit application materials 



no later than April 1st for the fall semester 
and December 1st for the spring semester. 
All students are encouraged to apply for aid 
as early as possible to ensure full 
consideration for available funds. 

The following application materials must 
be completed and submitted by each 
financial aid applicant. 

• University of New Haven Financial Aid 
Application. The application form must 
be completed fully, front and back, and 
submitted to the Financial Aid Office. 

• Financial Aid Form. The principal needs 
analysis document used in determining 
need, the FAF, must be filled out and 
submitted to the College Scholarship 
Service in Princeton, New Jersey. 
Applicants must request that the FAF 
report be sent to the University of New 
Haven (our code is 3663). FAF forms may 
be obtained from the Financial Aid Office 
or any high school guidance office. 

• Tax Documentation. Applicants must 
submit signed copies of both the student's 
and parent's complete federal income tax 
returns from the most recent tax year prior 
to the academic year. Tax forms must 
include all pertinent schedules. For those 
students or parents who did not and will 
not file a federal tax return for the year in 
question, a signed Non-Tax Filer form 
must be submitted to the Financial Aid 
Office. The Non-Tax Filer form is available 
at the Financial Aid Office. Students filing 



54 



as independents will not be required 
initially to submit their parent's tax 
documentation. They may be requested to 
do so when their application is reviewed. 

• Financial Aid Transcript. Transfer 
students must submit a financial aid 
transcript from all colleges or universities 
previously attended regardless of whether 
financial aid was received there. Forms are 
available in the Financial Aid Office. 

• Citizenship Documentation. Non-U. S. 
citizens who apply for need-based 
financial aid must submit immigration 
documentation to the Financial Aid Office. 
Citizenship forms are available in the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Other forms and documents may be 
requested from applicants as their aid 
applications are reviewed. Upon completion 
of the review of an application, the Financial 
Aid Office will notify an applicant of his or 
her eligibility for financial aid. 

• Financial Aid Refund Policy. When 
students are entitled to a refund as a result 
of withdrawal from courses, refunds will 
be based on the tuition refund policy as 
described elsewhere in the catalog. Aid 
awards will be adjusted as follows: 

For Federal Title IV Financial Aid Funds 
including Pell Grant, Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), 
Perkins Loan, Stafford Student Loan (SSL), 
Supplemental Loans For Students (SLS), 
and Parent Loans For Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS), the following refund 
formula would apply for the payment 
period: 

Institutional Refund x Total amount of 
Title IV aid (minus college work-study) -^- 
by Total amount of all aid (minus college 
work-study) = Federal Share of Refund 

The federal share of the refund will be 
allocated proportionately to each federal aid 
program from which the student received 
assistance. 

For State and Institutional Financial Aid Funds 
(after the federal share has been refunded) 
the refund wUl be based on the institutional 
refund policies as described elsewhere in the 



catalog. State and institutional refunds will 
be allocated proportionately to each state 
and institutional program from which the 
student received assistance. 

Academic Requirements for 
the Retention of Financial Aid 
Eligibility 

Academic requirements for continued 
eligibility for financial assistance for 
undergraduate students are posted in detail 
in the Financial Aid Office. A summary of 
the basic requirements includes: 

Full-time undergraduate students must 
successfully (passing letter grade) complete 
a minimum of 24 credits per academic year 
to remain eligible for financial aid. Students 
who enroll for only one semester in an 
academic year must complete a minimum of 
12 credits. 

Students must remain in good academic 
standing (not on probation) to continue to 
be eligible for financial assistance. Students 
placed on probation will not be eligible for 
financial aid of any kind. 

Part-time students must successfully 
complete all coursework to continue to be 
eligible for aid. Part-time students also must 
remain in good academic standing as 
detailed previously. 

Beginning with students entering the 
University of New Haven in September 1989 
or later, students will be limited to 10 
semesters of financial aid for academic 
programs of 121 credits or less, 11 semesters 
in programs over 121 credits. The number of 
semesters of aid eligibility for transfer 
students will be determined based on their 
advanced standing (number of transfer 
credits). The number of semesters less than 
full-time students are eligible* for aid 
depends on their status, i.e., half-time or 
three-quarter time. The following table 
illustrates the number of years of aid 
eligibility if a student remained consistently 
at the same enrollment status while 
completing his/her degree. 

Credit Hour Requirement 

Students must complete a required 
number of credit hours each academic year 



with passing letter grades. The minimum 
credit hour expectation is based on whether 
a student is attending full-time, three- 
quarter time, or half-time. 

Minimum Credit Hours (Cumulative) 

Year Full-Time 3/4 Time 1/2 Time 

1 24 18 12 

2 48 36 24 

3 72 54 36 

4 96 72 48 

5 120 90 60 

6 X 108 72 

7 X 126 84 

8 X X 96 

9 X X 108 
10 X X 120 

Students whose enrollment status 
changes from semester to semester will have 
their credit hours pro-rated based on 10 
semesters of full-time enrollment. 

Major Aid Programs 

Pell Grants — The Pell Grant Program is a 
federal program providing grant assistance 
to low income students. Students apply for 
Pell Grants through the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF) or through a direct application form 
available in the Financial Aid Office. Grants 
for the 1989-90 academic year are expected 
to range from $250 to $2300 with the 
student's eligibility being determined by the 
U.S. Department of Education. Eligible 
students will receive a Student Aid Report 
(SAR) from the Pell Grant Processing Center 
which must be submitted to the Financial 
Aid Office. Students must be enrolled for a 
minimum of six credits to be eligible. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant (SEOG) — SEOG is a federal program 
to provide grant assistance to exceptionally 
needy students. Students are selected by the 
university to receive SEOG Grants. 

Perkins Loan Program (formerly National 
Direct Student Loan Program) — The Perkins 
Loan Program is a federal loan program. 
Repayment on Perkins Loans begins six 
months after a recipient leaves school and 
carries a 5 percent rate of interest 
commencing with the repayment. Students 



Financial Aid 55 

are selected by the university to receive 
Perkins Loans. 

Stafford Student Loan (SSL)— The SSL 
Program is a federal loan program which 
provides up to $2625 to freshman and 
sophomore level students and $4000 to 
junior and senior level students. Students 
must demonstrate need to qualify. 
Participating banks, credit unions and 
savings and loan associations lend funds to 
students, with the loans guaranteed against 
default by the U.S. Government. 
Applications are available at banks 
throughout the United States and at college 
and university financial aid offices. The 
current interest rate for new borrowers is 8 
percent commencing with the repayment 
period which begins six months after 
graduation or withdrawal from college. The 
interest rate for nezv borrowers will increase 
to 10 percent in the fourth year of payment. 
Entrance and exit interviews must be 
conducted with all borrowers in the Stafford 
Student Loan Program. The Financial Aid 
Office will conduct these interviews with 
borrowers in person. The entrance interview 
must be conducted prior to the student's 
receipt of funds from their first loan only. 
Exit interviews must be conducted prior to a 
student's graduation or withdrawal. 

Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students 
(PLUS)— The PLUS Loan Program is a 
federal program in which parents of 
dependent students are permitted to apply 
for up to $4000 per year. The interest rate is 
variable. Application forms and information 
on this program are available at any 
participating bank. 

Supplemental Loan for Students (SLS) — 

The SLS Program is similar to the PLUS 
Program except that borrowers in this 
program include independent students and 
graduate students. The terms otherwise are 
the same as those in the PLUS Program. 

UNH/Citytrust Loan Program for Day 
Students — Credit-worthy students and/or 
parents may apply for a loan to cover 
educational expenses from $1000 to $10,000. 
Citytrust will evaluate and process loan 
applications in accordance with its standard 



56 



underwriting guidelines. If approved, the 
loan is to be repaid in 12 monthly 
installments beginning a month after 
disbursement and will carry an annual 
interest rate of 7 percent. For additional 
information and an application for the loan, 
contact the UNH Financial Aid Office. 

UNH/Citytrust Loan Program for Evening 
Students — Credit-worthy students (or 
jointly with parent or spouse) may apply for 
a loan to cover educational expenses up to a 
maximum of $3000 over a 12-month period. 
Applications should be submitted to the 
UNH Division of Continuing Education or 
Southeastern Connecticut offices. If 
approved, the loan is to be repaid in 12 
monthly installments beginning a month 
after disbursement and will carry an annual 
interest of 8 percent. 

College Work-Study Program (CWSP)— 

The College Work-Study Program is a 
federal financial aid program which 
provides employment opportunities for 
needy students. 

Connecticut Independent College Student 
Grant Program — Funds provided by the 
Connecticut General Assembly are awarded 
to needy Connecticut residents attending 
the university. 

Connecticut Scholastic Achievement Grant 
Program — Connecticut students who have 
finished in the top one-third of their high 
school class or who have scored 1100 or 
greater on their combined Scholastic 
Achievement Test (SAT) scores may be 
eligible for the Connecticut Scholastic 
Achievement Grant. Students must obtain 
an application from their high school 
guidance office and send a report of their 
Financial Aid Form (FAF) to the Connecticut 
Scholastic Achievement Grant Program 
(CSS Code #0286). 

University Grants-In-Aid — University 
grants are made in all divisions on the basis 
of need. 

University Excellence Awards — These are 
merit-based awards offered to five incoming 
freshmen. Awards are for $5000 per year and 
are renewable. 



Presidential Scholarships — Merit-based 
$1000 awards to incoming freshmen and 
transfer students are made available to 
selected students each year. A faculty 
committee selects incoming students for the 
program based on academic merit, high 
school records and standardized test scores. 

Athletic Grants-In-Aid — Athletic grants are 
provided to students for participation in 
sports. Selection for the awards is made by 
the athletic department based on students' 
athletic ability. Awards can range up to a full 
tuition, room and board scholarship. 
Athletic grants are available in the following 
sports: 

Men Women 

Football Softball 

Cross Country Volleyball 

Soccer Basketball 

Basketball Tennis 

Baseball 
Track and Field 

Miscellaneous State Scholarships — 

Students from selected states are eligible to 
apply for state scholarships which can be 
brought to Connecticut for attendance at the 
University of New Haven. Some states 
which permit scholarships to be taken out of 
state include: Delaware, Maine, Maryland, 
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and 
the District of Columbia. 
Donor Scholarships — Many scholarship 
awards are available each year through the 
generosity of business firms, charitable 
organizations and friends of the university. 
Scholarship funds are awarded from annual 
gifts from sponsors and from income from 
the university's endowments. 

Family Grant Program — The university will 
provide one-half tuition remission to one 
family member when two members of the 
same immediate family are concurrently 
enrolled. Specific guidelines and rules differ 
from one university division to the next. Day 
students may apply at the Financial Aid 
Office; other students may apply at the 
Division of Continuing Educahon or 
Graduate School. 



Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corp 

(AFROTO— Students at the University of 
New Haven are eligible to participate in 
courses offered through the AFROTC 
program based at the University of 
Connecticut. Some courses are offered on 
site at UNH. Courses are designed to 
introduce students to opportunities in the 
Air Force which can lead to commissions 
following graduation. AFROTC 
scholarships are available for participants 
who meet eligibility requirements. For 
information, contact UNH Professor Richard 
Penn (203) 932-7420 or the UConn Air Force 
ROTC office (203) 486-2224. 

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) — The 

Tuition Assistance Program is available to 
part-time evening students who 
demonstrate a high need for financial 
assistance. Qualified students may receive 
grant assistance for full tuition and the cost 
of books. Interested students should contact 
the Division of Continuing Education for 
information about admission to the TAP 
program and the Financial Aid Office for 
assistance in applying. 

The following scholarships are awarded at the 
discretion of the university and require no special 
application form — unless otherwise noted — other 
than the standard application for financial aid. 

Alumni Association Scholarships — Merit- 
based awards are given to students in each 
of the university's divisions — day, 
continuing education and graduate. 

Alumni Scholarships — Scholarships are 
available each year on a need basis for any 
son or daughter of an alumnus or alumna of 
the university. 

Amity Charitable Trust Fund — An annual 
award is made from the income of this fund 
to a worthy, needy student. Preference is 
given to students from the greater New 
Haven area. The fund was made possible 
through the generosity of the Amity Club. 

The Barn Sale Scholarship — A scholarship 
is available each year for a deserving. 



Financial Aid 57 

upperclass disabled student. The award is 
made possible by an endowment 
established by the Barn Sale, Inc. 

Carmel Benevento Memorial Scholarship — 

This award is made annually to a woman 
entering the university as a freshman. The 
award was established in memory of Carmel 
Benevento and is based on need and 
academic and creative ability. 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield — Joseph F. 
Duplinsky Scholarship. This award was 
established by Blue Cross & Blue Shield of 
Connecticut to honor its past chairman and 
UNH alumnus. One sophomore is selected 
annually for a two-year, one-half tuition 
scholarship, awarded in the student's junior 
and senior years, with a paid summer 
internship at Blue Cross & Blue Shield of 
Connecticut between years. Students must 
be business administration majors and 
Connecticut residents. Selection is based on 
need and academic merit. The company 
hopes to be able to offer full-time 
employment to scholarship recipients upon 
graduation. 

Bozzuto Charity Sports Classic 
Scholarship — Income from this endowment 
provides for an annual award to a needy 
student. 

Chesebrough-Ponds Engineering 
Scholarship — Five $2500 awards are 
available to engineering students with need. 
Preference is given to minority students. 
The scholarships are made possible through 
the generosity of the Chesebrough-Ponds 
Company. 

Citytrust Scholarship — An endowed 
scholarship established by Citytrust Bank is 
offered annually to one or more deserving 
minority students from Connecticut, with 
preference given to New Haven residents. 

Clarence Dunham Scholarship — A merit- 
based award is made each year to a 
deserving student majoring in civil 
engineering. Selection is made by the faculty 
of the civil engineering department. 



58 



Echlin Family Scholarships — Several 
annual awards of $2000 are made to needy 
business or engineering students. The 
awards are made possible through an 
endowment established through the 
generosity of John and Beryl Echlin. 

Eder Brothers Scholarships — Annual 
awards are made to hotel/restaurant 
management students. The awards are 
made possible by Eder Brothers, Inc., of 
West Haven, Connecticut. 

James Jacob Gerowin Memorial 
Scholarship — An annual award is made to a 
needy engineering student showing 
academic promise. The award is in memory 
of James Gerowin of the Class of 1985. 

Greater New Haven Consumer Credit 
Association Scholarship — An annual award 
is made to a business major from the greater 
New Haven area. Preference is given to 
freshmen. 

Paul Kane Memorial Scholarship — An 

award is available each year to an active 
scholar-athlete with preference to a 
Hamden, Connecticut, resident. The award 
is made in memory of Paul Kane, a 
university alumnus who was killed in the 
service of his country. 

Nathanial Kaplan Memorial Scholarship — 

An award in memory of Nathanial Kaplan, 
a former English professor, is made each 
year to a student who has been enrolled in 
the School of Arts and Sciences for at least 
two years. Student must demonstrate need. 

Peggy Leuzzi Memorial Scholarship — An 

annual scholarship awarded in memory of 
Mrs. Leuzzi, a former employee of the 
university. A scholarship is provided to an 
incoming freshman woman and is made 
possible through the generosity of Joseph 
and Rosemary Macionus. 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship — An annual award in honor of 
Dr. King is made to a deserving, needy 
student. Preference is given to minority 
students. 



Ahmed Mandour Memorial Scholarship — 

An award is available each year to a junior 
or senior student majoring in economics 
enrolled in the School of Professional 
Studies and Continuing Education. The 
award is made in memory of Dr. Mandour, 
a former dean at the university. 

Arnold Markle Scholarship — An annual 
award to a criminal justice major in memory 
of Arnold Markle, former State's Attorney 
for the Judicial District of New Haven. 

Middlesex Mutual Assurance Company 
Scholarship — Two annual awards are made 
possible by the company for residents of 
Connecticut. 

National Association of Accountants 
Scholarship — An award is made available 
by the NAA to a needy junior accounting 
major from the greater New Haven area. 

Virginia M, Parker Scholarship — An award 
is made each year from this endowed 
scholarship to an undergraduate woman by 
Chi Kappa Rho sorority. 

Marvin K. Peterson Scholarship-CSB 
Award — An award is made possible from 
the income of this endowed scholarship 
which was established in honor of Mr. 
Peterson, a former president of the 
university. The endowment was established 
through the generosity of the Connecticut 
Savings Bank. 

Marvin K. Peterson-Evening Student 
Council Scholarship — This scholarship was 
established by the Evening Student Council 
of the University of New Haven in 1969 to 
honor past president, Marvin K. Peterson 
(1953-1973). The scholarship, awarded to 
undergraduate evening students, is entirely 
funded by the Evening Student Council. 

The Executive Board of the Evening 
Student Council carefully screens each 
application, considering each student based 
on financial need, quality point ratio (a 
minimum 3.0 is required), length of time 
attending the university and other financial 
aid received by the student. 



Financial Aid 59 



Eugene and Mary Rosazza Scholarship 
Fund — An award is made each year from the 
income of this endowment, which was 
established in memory of Mr. Rosazza, an 
alumnus of the university. 

DeForest Smith Scholarship — An award 
made possible for police officers from 
Milford. Sponsored by DeForest Smith of 
George Smith and Son, Realtors. 

Southern Connecticut Gas Company 
Scholarship — A scholarship is made 
available annually to a needy student from 
the company's service area in the greater 
New Haven and Bridgeport areas. 

University of New Haven at Southeastern 
Connecticut Student Council Scholarship — 

An annual award is made available by the 
Student Council to an incoming freshman at 
the main campus who resides in the New 
London/Groton area. 



West Haven Scholarship — An endowed 
scholarship established by the City of West 
Haven and other local businesses and 
individuals for the benefit of needy West 
Haven residents attending the university. 

Wiggin and Dana Scholarship — Two 

annual awards are made possible by Wiggin 
and Dana, a New Haven-based law firm. 
Awards are made to students from 
Connecticut. 



STUDENT 
LIFE 



61 



James E. Martin, Ph.D., dean for 
students 

Being a student at the University of New 
Haven means being a part of the New Haven 
community — a city noted for its music, 
theater, art galleries and more. 

Musical entertainment ranges from year- 
round performances of the New Haven 
Symphony to rock concerts at the New 
Haven Coliseum to local bands at many 
downtown clubs. Professional theater 
thrives in New Haven at Long Wharf 
Theater, the Yale Repertory Company and 
the Shubert. Some of the region's 
outstanding art collections can be seen on 
the Yale University campus. 

On weekends, the Connecticut shore, 
Cape Cod, the ski slopes of Vermont and 
New Hampshire, and New York City are 
just a car or train ride away. 

Student Activities 

Kathryn McQueeney, director 

Students enjoy a variety of events on 
campus including dances, films, lectures, 
jazz concerts, student theatrical 
productions, comedian shows, student 
game shows, bus trips to local sports events, 
and more. 

Campus Traditions 

Special theme weekends such as 
Homecoming, Parents' Weekend, and May 
Day are popular campus traditions which 
involve students in an array of campus-wide 



programs. Whether it's building floats for 
the Homecoming Parade, "gambling" at the 
Parents' Weekend Casino Nite, or dancing 
outside to bands under the May Day tent, 
there are plenty of ways to catch the UNH 
spirit on campus. 

Clubs and Organizations 

More than 40 university student clubs and 
societies are open to interested students. 
Included are student chapters of 
professional societies, religious 
organizations, social groups and special 
interest clubs such as the International 
Student Association and the Black Student 
Union. 

Councils 

Separate day, evening and graduate 
student councils have the responsibility for 
initiating, organizing and presenting 
extracurricular activities and acting as a 
liaison between students and university 
staff. 

The Day Student Government (DSC) is a 
forum where undergraduate day students 
provide input to the administration to 
improve all aspects of undergraduate 
education at the university. Student-elected 
senators represent the voice of their 
constituencies at weekly DSC meetings. 

Students are strongly encouraged to get 
involved with leadership positions within 
the DSC and other clubs and organizations. 



62 

The university believes that leadership 
development is an integral part of all 
students' education. 

Cultural Activities 

There are student events formed around 
interests in literature, art, film and drama. 
These include visiting artists and lecturers 
and play and concert productions. The 
University of New Haven is committed to 
providing a well-rounded cultural program 
for students. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

National and local service, social and 
honorary fraternities and sororities are 
active on campus. They sponsor programs 
such as banquets, theme parties, the semi- 
annual Bloodmobile, AIDS Awareness 
Week, and fundraisers to benefit charities. 

Publications 

Student publications include The Charger 
Bulletin, the university newspaper, and The 
Chariot, the annual yearbook. Students may 
volunteer their services to these student 
publications by contacting the DSG Office. 

Alumni Office 

Patricia J. Rooney, R.S.M., director 

Membership in the UNH Alumni 
Association is acquired automatically upon 
graduation. There are currently 
approximately 21,000 members. 

Alumni are entitled to certain privileges 
including use of the library and athletic 
facilities, services of the Career 
Development Office and special alumni 
course auditing rates. ID cards issued to new 
graduates soon after graduation entitle 
alumni to these and other offerings. 

Insight, containing news of campus and 
alumni happenings, is mailed periodically 
throughout the year. Homecoming, an 
annual scholarship ball, estate planning 
seminars and other educational and social 
events offer opportunities for continual 
contact with UNH and fellow alumni. 
Charter travel, life and major medical 
insurance programs are also available. 



Alumni board members govern the 
association with the assistance of a council 
of additional alumni volunteers. The board 
and council serve as an advisory group to 
the university, working to strengthen bonds 
by promoting communication between all 
alumni and the UNH community. Working 
standing committees of the alumni council 
include Homecoming, Phonathons, 
Distinguished Alumnus Selection, 
Scholarship Ball, Special Activities and 
Public Relations. 

A student alumni group provides an 
additional link between students and 
alumni. Its efforts help increase students' 
awareness of the valuable role alumni can 
play in their lives and keep alumni informed 
of the special needs of students. 

Athletics 

William M. Leete, Jr., director 

Recognizing the importance of a broad 
range of physical and emotional outlets to a 
well-balanced college experience, the 
University of New Haven seeks to involve 
the student on various levels of active 
participation in games and sports, as well as 
to provide an opportunity for community 
and student support for its varsity 
intercollegiate program. 

Varsity Sports 

During the fall, the university offers 
varsity cross country, football, soccer, 
women's tennis and volleyball. In the 
winter, men's and women's basketball as 
well as indoor track are the main attractions. 
During the spring, baseball, lacrosse, 
Softball and outdoor track keep UNH 
athletic fields busy. 

The athletic department coaching staff 
welcomes all interested candidates and 
invites active involvement in and support of 
its athletic programs. 

The University of New Haven is a member 
of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, the Eastern College Athletic 
Conference, and the New England 
Collegiate Conference. Many of the Charger 
teams have earned national top-20 ranking 



Student Life 63 



in recent years highlighted by the women's 
basketball team earning the National 
Championship in 1987. Our athletes have 
traveled extensively throughout the country 
to Florida, California, Alabama, Illinois and 
Nebraska, as well as throughout the 
Northeast. 

Intramural Programs 

The intramural department sponsors a 
variety of events for interested students 
throughout the year. Tournaments and 
competition in touch football, basketball, 
handball, softball, racquetball, tennis and 
volleyball are offered. Team rosters are 
available in the athletic office and schedules 
are posted in the gymnasium. 

Athletic Facilities 

The North Campus consists of Robert B. 
Dodds Stadium (with a multi-purpose 
natural surface field designed for football, 
soccer and lacrosse), six tennis courts, a 
Softball field, a baseball diamond, an 
intramural field and a gymnasium. 

The gymnasium houses two full-size 
basketball courts, a weight-training room, 
an exercise area, a racquetball court and 
locker and shower areas for students and 
faculty. 

A valid university ID card is required for 
admittance to the North Campus 
gymnasium or tennis courts during free play 
hours. The gymnasium will open for free 
play at times when regularly scheduled 
games and varsity team practices are not in 
progress. Students should take care to 
secure their lockers or leave properly 
identified valuables with the equipment 
manager when using any facility. 

Campus Store 

Barbara Farrell, manager 

The university's campus store sells all 
necessary texts, new and used, required for 
courses at the university. It also carries 
school supplies, greeting cards, imprinted 
clothing, gifts, candy and a selection of 
paperbacks, newspapers and periodicals. 
The campus store buys back certain used 
texts throughout the year. It also handles 



class ring orders and film processing for the 
campus community and will be happy to 
place special orders for any books. 

Special arrangements are made for 
students taking courses at off-campus 
locations to purchase required books. 

Career Development Office 

Pamela Francis, director 

This office offers employment-related 
services to the university community. 
Among these are career counseling, 
advising, on-campus employment 
interviewing and extensive information 
about job opportunities. 

Administrative and recruiting offices are 
located on the third level of the Student 
Center. 

Career Development 

To assist students in making appropriate 
career choices, individual/group counseling 
is available and is supplemented by several 
office resources. Special workshops on 
resume preparation, interviewing skills and 
job research techniques are scheduled in 
both the fall and spring semesters. 

In addition, the office maintains an 
extensive library of career information, 
vocational resources, brochures and annual 
reports. 

A professional career testing service is also 
available for those students with questions 
about what career direction to pursue. 

Student Employment 

During each academic year, employer 
representatives visit the campus to interview 
graduating University of New Haven 
students, both at the graduate and 
undergraduate levels. While the Career 
Development Office is not an employment 
service and does not guarantee jobs, 
extensive listings of both full- and part-time 
positions are also maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers and 
prospective employees. Undergraduate and 
graduate students will find this useful, both 
in locating part-time and full-time jobs while 
in school, as well as employment following 
graduation. Alumni seeking positions are 



64 



encouraged to use the services of the office. 
Employers wishing to list positions need 
only call or write, giving a description of the 
position available and other details. There is 
no placement fee charged for these services. 

Information 

The Career Development Office regularly 
publishes and circulates a monthly campus 
recruiting schedule the first week of every 
month during the academic year. 
Information such as career development 
events. Career Days, workshops, seminars, 
recruitment visits, employment outlook for 
graduates, job listings, job search hints, etc., 
are included. Career development 
information also appears in Insight, the 
alumni publication, and in the weekly 
student newspaper. The Charger Bulletin. 

The recruitment schedule will be mailed 
to any member of the university community 
who wishes it and provides the office with a 
supply of stamped, self-addressed 
envelopes for the number of months 
desired. 

Center for Learning Resources 

Loretta K. Smith, director 

The Center for Learning Resources, in 
Maxcy Hall, offers a tutoring service open to 
all students on campus, not just those in 
academic difficulty. The staff of instructors 
and student tutors provides tutoring in a 
variety of subjects including mathematics, 
engineering science, accounting, study 
skills, writing and computer science. All 
tutoring is free and no appointment is 
necessary. Daytime and evening hours are 
posted in the center. During the 1988 fall 
semester, the center provided more than 
2,400 tutoring sessions to undergraduate 
students. 

See also the section on the Developmental 
Studies program. 



Cooperative Education 

Pamela Francis, director 

Cooperative education (Co-op) is an 
academic support program that enables 
students to combine career-oriented, paid, 
full-time work experience with their college 
education. Co-op students benefit by being 
able to explore career interests firsthand, by 
gaining valuable work experience related to 
their majors, and by earning money to assist 
with their college expenses. 

How Co-op Works 

Students may enroll in Co-op when they 
begin their degree programs. Work 
assignments start later, usually at the end of 
the sophomore year. Since the keys to a 
successful Co-op experience are flexibility 
and preparation. Co-op coordinators advise 
and counsel students in each academic area, 
helping students to prepare resumes and 
develop interview skills. 

The flexibility of the UNH Co-op program 
gives both full- and part-time students a 
chance to schedule plans of study and work 
which will fit their needs. Undergraduate 
students attend classes for the first two years 
of college and they prepare for work 
assignments which start at the end of the 
sophomore year. Juniors and seniors 
alternate classes with Co-op work which 
may last four or six months. Transfer 
students usually enter the Co-op cycle as if 
they were sophomores, but individual cases 
vary and students will review their needs 
with Co-op coordinators. 

The variety and number of Co-op 
employers attest to their recognition that 
cooperative education is an effective way to 
identify and train future employees. UNH 
Co-op employers include large, technology- 
based corporations such as United 
Technologies' Pratt & Whitney and Norden 
Systems divisions, Uniroyal Chemical 
Corporation, Inc., General Electric and 
General Dynamics' Electric Boat Division. 



Co-op students can explore careers in 
information services with small firms as well 
as industry leaders such as AETNA and 
IBM. The rapidly growing hospitality 
industry offers many opportunities ranging 
from the Sheraton Hotel and Towers in 
nearby Stamford, Connecticut, to Marriott 
Corporation resorts and hotels in Colorado 
and Florida. 

State and federal government agencies 
such as the Department of Transportation, 
the IRS and the U.S. Customs Bureau also 
are an important resource. Student 
assignments include computer 
programming, accounting, counseling and 
criminal investigation. While most of the Co- 
op jobs are in Connecticut and adjacent 
states, there are opportunities throughout 
the mid-Atlantic area, including 
Washington, D.C. Students may live in 
university housing while doing work 
assignments in the greater New Haven area 
or they may work with their Co-op 
coordinators to develop jobs at home. 

Students interested in Co-op will meet 
with a Co-op coordinator to review eligibility 
requirements and the plan of study for their 
degree program. Co-op plans vary so it is 
important for students in the Schools of Arts 
and Sciences, Business, Engineering, 
Professional Studies, and Hotel, Restaurant 
and Tourism Administration to take 
advantage of the individual attention their 
Co-op coordinators will provide. With this 
support. Co-op students can combine 
classroom theory and work experience to 
make the most of their college careers. 

Counseling Center 

Dr. Deborah Everhart, director 

The Counseling Center offers services 
designed to help students with problems 
that may interfere with their academic, 
social or personal activities. The services 
provided include confidential personal 
counseling, academic counseling, vocational 
counseling and testing, personality 
assessment, and educational assessment. 
The Counseling Center also processes all 
withdrawals and leaves of absence from the 
undergraduate Day Division. 



Student Life 65 

Development Office 

Nikki Lindberg, director 

The Development Office staff work with 
the president of the university, board of 
governors, faculty and staff to secure both 
short and long term funding for 
enhancement of the university's programs 
and facilities. Funds are sought for student 
financial aid, faculty development, 
equipment, library resources and other 
institutional opportunities for growth over 
and above what can be achieved from 
regular and anticipated university income. 

National and local foundations, parents, 
students, alumni and friends support these 
efforts and contribute to the excellence of the 
university. Students play an active role 
participating in fund raising events and 
soliciting for the annual alumni fund. 

Developmental Studies 
Program 

The developmental studies program is 
designed to strengthen the basic skills of 
entering students. Courses within the 
program are taught by members of the 
faculty of the mathematics department and 
the English department. 

The English department offers three 
developmental courses: E 101 Reading 
Strategies; E 103 English Fundamentals; 
and E 114 Oral Exposition. The three 
courses offer students a comprehensive 
study of the basic reading, writing and 
speaking skills necessary in using our 
language effectively. M 103 Fundamentals 
of Mathematics is taught by the 
mathematics department. 

Placement in these courses is determined 
by examinations given by the respective 
departments. Such placement becomes a 
first priority for affected students because 
the university believes such students can 
become successful college students only 
upon correction of skill deficiencies. 

Please note these special provisions 
concerning E 101, E 103 and M 103. E 101 is 
a one-credit course. E 103 and M 103 each 
carry three college credits but cannot be 
applied toward students' degree programs. 
E 103 and M 103 usually meet for up to six 
hours per week to provide intensive help. 



66 



Complete descriptions of the 
developmental courses appear in this 
catalog as part of the course offerings of the 
mathematics department and the English 
department. 

Disabled Student Services 

David Kmetz, director 

The Disabled Student Services Office 
coordinates all referrals regarding physically 
handicapped and learning disabled 
students. It provides guidance, assistance 
and information for students with 
disabilities. This office also coordinates the 
university's compliance with Section 504 of 
the H.E.W. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and 
other governmental regulations. 

All referrals and inquiries concerning any 
matters relating to disabled students, 
accessible facilities and/or reasonable 
accommodations should be directed to this 
office. 

Health Services 

Phyllis Landry, assistant director 

The University Health Services is open to 
all university students without charge. 
Located on the ground level in the rear of 
the Pare Vendome Residence Hall, the 
center is staffed with two registered nurses 
and two part-time physicians. Health 
Services provides initial care for minor 
illnesses and injuries, and diagnosis, referral 
and follow-up care for more serious 
conditions. Also provided is care and 
counseling in health related issues. Health 
Services coordinates the health insurance 
program that is sponsored by the university. 

A part of the health program is a weekly 
women's clinic which takes place at the 
health center and covers gynecological 
problems, birth control and sex-related 
issues. 

One requirement of the health center is 
that all students entering the Day Division 
provide documentation of their medical and 
immunization history by completing the 
health form provided by the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office and returning it to the 



Health Services Office. This requirement is 
in compliance with the State of Connecticut 
Health Department's guidelines for 
immunization and disease control. 

International Services 

Mary F. Idzior, director 

The university has a large and active 
international student program with more 
than 300 students from more than 50 
countries. In addition to assisting students 
with immigration and adjustment matters. 
International Services works with the 
International Student Association to 
coordinate and plan cultural, educational 
and social programs. 

Meal Plans 

The Student Center houses three dining 
areas: a snack bar in the Charger Cafe is 
located on the main floor, a deli/grill area 
and a full-menu dining commons are located 
on the ground floor. 

Meal plan options are offered to fit the 
needs of all students. Purchasing a plan, 
while highly recommended for all students, 
is required for all freshmen. Meal plan 
contracts are available at the Dining Services 
Office. 

Minority Affairs 

Johnnie M. Fryer, director 

The director of the Office of Minority 
Affairs works closely with students, faculty 
and administrators in developing and 
implementing educational programs for 
minority students. The office also provides 
academic and personal advising for students 
to assist them in their growth and transition 
to the various facets of the university's 
environment. 

The Office of Minority Affairs serves as a 
catalyst in building a support network 
between the community at large and UNH. 
Even though the Office of Minority Affairs 
has a special interest in issues of Black, 
Hispanic, Asian and American Indian 
students, all students are encouraged to take 



Student Life 67 



advantage of the financial, academic and 
personal advising. In addition, all students 
are also encouraged to participate in the 
various educational, social and cultural 
programs. 



Residential Life 

Rebecca D. Johnson, director 

The character of residential living is often 
a good indication of the spirit and life on 
campus. For this reason the University of 
New Haven strives to make its residential 
facilities places which encourage academic 
and personal development. 

On-campus university housing includes a 
suite-style residence hall for freshmen, with 
two- and three-student bedrooms arranged 
in groups of six around a common living 
room and bath. Upperclassmen residence 
halls are equipped with partial kitchens. 
Students are permitted to bring in 
microwave ovens for cooking purposes. All 
on-campus residences are furnished and 
include lounges and laundry facilities. 
Resident staff members and active student 
hall councils work to promote an 
atmosphere conducive for study and social 
development in each hall. University 
housing is occupied on an academic year 
basis. 

All freshmen residing on campus are 
required to purchase a university meal plan. 
Upperclassmen residents have the option of 
taking a meal plan or providing for their own 
meals or a combination of both. 

The Office of Residential Life maintains a 
listing of available off-campus housing. 
Because of the limited number of off-campus 
apartments available in the immediate area, 
the university is unable to guarantee off- 
campus accommodations. While university 
staff will be happy to discuss and advise 
students undertaking a lease with an off- 
campus landlord, the university cannot take 
responsibility for that lease. Students are 
responsible for any contract undertaken for 
housing and should carefully consider the 
nature of that contract and the 
responsibilities incurred. 



Student Center 

The Student Center provides a focal point 
for all student activities. Offering lounges, 
student offices, a game room, a large 
cafeteria and a snack bar, the facility has 
been designed to serve as a center for the 
student's non-academic college interests. 

The Charger Cafe, also located in the 
Student Center, opens daily at 4 p.m. 
serving snacks and beverages. Live 
entertainment and films are often presented 
in the cafe in the evenings. 

WNHU Radio 

Bruce Avery, general manager 

WNHU, the university's student- 
operated FM stereo broadcast facility, is 
operated by the Communication 
Department of the School of Business 
throughout the year on a frequency of 88.7 
MHz at a power of 1,700 watts. This 
extracurricular activity, open to all 
undergraduate or graduate students, serves 
southern Connecticut and eastern Long 
Island with the best in music, news and 
community affairs programming. The 
WNHU broadcast day consists of locally 
produced shows as well as various programs 
provided by several public networks. 

Most WNHU activities in programming, 
business and engineering operations are 
performed by students in the university's 
day, continuing education and graduate 
divisions. The station will train all qualified 
students in their respective areas of interest. 

Women's Affairs 

Supported by a number of women faculty 
and administrators with the help of 
interested students. Women's Affairs 
coordinates a variety of programs of special 
interest to women. 

Some of the innovative programs which 
have been developed include the Women's 
Health Center, programs targeted to the 
returning adult woman student, a mentor 
program for freshmen women, and 
women's studies course offerings. 

Further details are available at the Dean 
for Student Life office. 



69 



SCHOOL OF 
ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Joseph B. Chepaitis, Ph.D., dean 

There is no more significant preparation 
for careers and lifetime personal 
development than a liberal education. 
Recent studies show that such an education 
prepares college graduates effectively for a 
career. These graduates are able to adapt to 
new environments, to think critically and 
conceptually, to integrate broad ranges of 
experience, to set goals and develop 
independence of thought, to seek leadership 
roles and to possess better overall 
interpersonal and administrative skills. 
These studies also reveal that many students 
educated in the arts and sciences ultimately 
attain responsible managerial positions in 
private or public organizations or their own 
businesses because of the job training 
provided by a liberal education. A practical 
education, whether for a career or the job of 
living, is a liberal education. 

The ideals of a liberal education are 
intellectual and imaginative growth, 
freedom of thought and inquiry and a sense 
of personal worth. The active pursuit of 
wisdom, the enrichment of the spirit and the 
development of each individual as a person 
offer the world its best hope for the future. 

It is the aim of the School of Arts and 
Sciences to offer students the opportunity 
for a liberal education which will enrich the 
mind while it prepares them to pursue their 
interests and goals. Courses and programs 



have been designed to appeal to a wide 
range of interests. 

Education is comprised of many elements, 
and not all education takes place in the 
classroom or even on the campus. New 
Haven is an exciting cultural center which 
offers libraries, natural history museums, art 
museums and exhibitions and workshops 
for dance and the creative arts. A constant 
procession of speakers and performing 
artists comes to the New Haven area. Long 
Wharf Theater is the home of an excellent 
regional company offering a varied fare of 
classics and new plays, and the Yale 
Repertory Theater is innovative and 
exciting. Programs of old and new films are 
offered on several area college campuses. 

Speakers and performing artists are 
brought to the University of New Haven 
campus, and a series of concerts is organized 
by the world music program. The 
university's library offers comfortable 
surroundings for study and leisure reading. 
It has an excellent collection of books, 
journals, periodicals and phonograph 
records. 

In the School of Arts and Sciences, 
students are encouraged to pursue as broad- 
based a program of study as possible. 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers 
programs leading to the bachelor of arts 
degree, the bachelor of science degree, the 



70 

associate in science, in addition to a number 
of certificates. 

Through the Graduate School, the School 
of Arts and Sciences offers programs leading 
to the master of arts degree, the master of 
science degree and senior professional 
certificates. 

Programs and Concentrations 

Bachelor of Arts 

Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communication 

Economics 

English 

Writing 

Literature 
Graphic Design 

Photography 
History 
Interior Design 

Pre-architecture 
Mathematics 
Music 

Music and Sound Recording 
Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 

Community-Clinical 

Industrial/Organizational 

General Psychology 
Sociology 

Social Service 

Bachelor of Science 

Applied Mathematics 

Natural Science 

Computer Science 

Statistics 
Biology 

Biomedical Computing 
Biology — Premedical/Preveterinary/ 

Predental 
Environmental Science 
Music and Sound Recording 
Physics 

Associate in Science 

Biology 

Environmental Science 
General Studies 



Graphic Design 
Photography 
Interior Design 
Journalism 

Certificates 

Art 

Graphic Design 

Interior Design 

Photography 
Journalism 
Paralegal Studies 
Public Policy 

Master of Arts 

Community Psychology 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

Master of Science 

Environmental Science 

Senior Professional Certificate 

Applications of Psychology 

Minors 

It is highly recommended that students 
working toward a degree in one area of 
study give serious thought to organizing 
their elective courses so as to receive a minor 
in a second discipline. A minor usually 
consists of 18 credit hours devoted to the 
study of either a group of related subjects or 
subjects offered by one department. 

Students are encouraged to minor in 
accounting, anthropology, art, biology. 
Black studies, chemistry, communication, 
criminal justice, economics, English, 
history, international business, journalism, 
management, marketing, mathematics, 
nutrition, philosophy, physics, political 
science, psychology, public administration, 
social welfare, sociology, theatre or music. 
Students interested in studying for a minor 
should consult with the chairman of the 
department offering the minor. 

David Humphreys Honors Program 

The David Humphreys Honors Program 
is a four-year honors program offered by the 
School of Arts and Sciences. The program is 
named after David Humphreys, a diplomat, 
manufacturer, soldier and an intellectual 
who was born in Derby, Connecticut, in 
1752. Humphreys' life clearly illustrates that 
a love for the liberal arts is consistent with 



success in the practical world, thereby 
constituting a fitting model for students 
majoring in the arts and sciences at the 
University of New Haven. 

All students admitted to the program are 
automatically nominated for University 
Excellence Awards and Presidential 
Scholarships. Students can enter directly 
from high school or can be admitted to the 
program prior to completing 50 credits of 
course work toward the undergraduate 
degree. Transfer students are also eligible. 

The honors program is designed for 
highly motivated students who have 
demonstrated exceptional academic 
achievement. Evidence of such achievement 
includes secondary school and (when 
appropriate) previous collegiate grades, 
class rank, standardized test scores, 
participation in special programs and 
activities and recommendations from 
instructors. 

Required Honors Courses 

The honors curriculum consists of 10 
courses, carrying a total of 30 credits. Eight 
of the courses (24 credits) are courses in the 
university core curriculum which have been 
designed specifically to meet the objectives 
of the honors program. The six-credit Senior 
Seminar and Honors Thesis round out the 
program. 

E 105H/Honors English Seminar I* 
E llOH/Honors English Seminar II 
HS lOlH/Honors History: Western 

Civilization 
M 121H/Honors Mathematics: Algebraic 

Structures I 
AT 331H/Honors Arts: Contemporary Arts 
PL 215H/Honors Philosophy and Literature: 

Nature of the Self 
PS 390H/Honors Social Science: Political 

Modernization 
HU 300H/ Honors Scientific Methodology: 

The Nature of Science 
Senior Seminar and Thesis I 
Senior Seminar and Thesis II 
* CO 100, £ 220, or E 225 may also be taken by honors 

students in place of E 105H. 

Non-Honors Students in Honors Courses 

All University of New Haven students, 
regardless of school, who are not in the 



Arts and Sciences 71 

honors program may take honors courses 
with the approval of the Director of the 
Honors Program. Such students must have 
demonstrated exceptional academic ability 
to be admitted. Honors courses taken by 
non-honors students will be designated as 
honors on the student's transcript. 

Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward 
an undergraduate degree by registering for 
one of the certificates offered by the School 
of Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the 
School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education. 

Each certificate is carefully designed as a 
concentrated introduction to a particular 
subject area and generally consists of 
courses totaling 15 to 18 credit hours. 

Later, students may choose to apply the 
credits they have earned toward their 
undergraduate degree at the university. 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to the School 
of Arts and Sciences must be a graduate of 
an approved secondary school or the 
equivalent. While no set program of high 
school subjects is prescribed, an applicant 
must meet the standard of the university in 
respect to the high school average. 
Applicants must present 15 acceptable units 
of satisfactory work, including nine or more 
units of college preparatory subjects. 
Satisfactory scores on College Entrance 
Examination Board (SAT) or American 
College Testing (ACT) program tests are 
required. 

University Core Curriculum 

In addition to department requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
core curriculum. 

A.S., General Studies 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers the 
A.S. in general studies to serve two different 
student populations. The first is the new or 
returning student who wishes a general 



72 

liberal arts education for personal 
enrichment. The second type of student is 
the one who is undecided about career 
objectives and wishes to defer the choice of 
a major field. 

Nearly half of the 61 credit hours required 
for the degree are free electives. This 
flexibility permits the student to take courses 
in a number of different fields prior to 
choosing a major. By judicious choice of 
electives, it is possible to transfer into majors 
in any of the schools in the university. 

Students planning to transfer to four-year 
programs in the School of Arts and Sciences 
should note additional core requirements in 
science and mathematics, English literature, 
fine arts and social science, as well as special 
requirements in particular major programs. 

Required Courses 

Students must complete 61 credit hours 
of courses to earn the associate degree with 
a general studies major, including the 
courses listed below: 

(cc) E 105/Composition 

(cc) E 110/Composition and Literature 

(cc) HS 101/Foundations of the Western 

World 
(cc) Plus 1 mathematics course (M 109 or M 

127 or higher) 
(cc) 1 literature or philosophy course (E 201 

or E 202; PL 201 or PL 215 or PL 222) 
(cc) 1 fine arts, or music, or theater course* 
(cc) 1 computer course* 
(cc) 1 science course with laboratory* 
(cc) 4 social science courses: EC 133, P 111, 

PS 121 and SO 113 
cc — Course which satisfies the University Core 
Curriculum requirements on pp. 19-21. 
* — Courses chosen from the University Core 
Curriculum listing on pp. 19-21. 



Department of 
Biology and 
Environmental 
Science 

Chairman: Henry E. Voegeh, Ph.D. 

Professors: Burton C Staugaard, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; Charles L. 
Vig^e, Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University; Henry E. Voegeli, Ph.D., 
University of Rhode Island 

Assistant Professor: Roman N. Zajac, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Practitioner-in-residence: Thomas 
McGrath, M.S., University of Connecticut 

Biology provides one of the cornerstones 
of a liberal education by increasing the 
knowledge and appreciation of oneself and 
of other living organisms in the ecosphere. 
As a major, biology prepares the student for 
professional or graduate training or for 
technical positions in one of the health or 
life-science fields. The department is well 
equipped with apparatus ranging from 
boats to study aquatic ecosystems to an 
electron microscope for the study of 
biological ultra structure. 

Because of the close relationship to 
chemistry, physics, psychology and 
sociology, biology provides an area for an 
academic minor concentration for students 
majoring in these and other disciplines such 
as business or engineering. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 



Honor Society 

The University of New Haven has a 
chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the honor society 
in biology. Full membership requires an 
average of 3.0 in biological courses and 3.0 
overall. Students majoring in biology with 
lower grades and those majoring in other 
areas may affiliate as associate members. 
The society promotes scholarship, research 
and intellectual experiences outside the 
classroom. 

Basic Courses Required for 
Biology Majors 

All students earning a bachelor's degree 
in biology must complete the university's 
core requirements, the course requirements 
for their particular biology program, and 
basic biology courses listed below: 

BI 253/Biology for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 
CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 
CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 
CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 
CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 
CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 
PH 103/GeneraI Physics I 
PH 104/General Physics II 
PH 105/General Physics Laboratory I 
PH 106/General Physics Laboratory II 

B.A., Biology 

Students earning a B.A. with a biology 
major must complete 122-123 credit hours. 
Courses include the basic biology courses 
listed earlier in this section, the core 
requirements of the university, electives, 
eight of the following 15 restricted electives, 
and the required courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

Choice of math courses M 115 Precalculus 
and M 117 Calculus I or M 117 Calculus I and 
M 118 Calculus II or M 127 Finite Math and 
M 228 Elementary Statistics. 



Arts and Sciences 73 

Restricted Electives 

BI 301/Microbiology with Laboratory 
BI 302/Bacteriology with Laboratory 
BI 303/Histology with Laboratory 
BI 304/Immunology with Laboratory 
BI 305/Developmental Biology with 

Laboratory 
BI 308/Cell Physiology with Laboratory 
BI 310/Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 

with Laboratory 
BI 311/Genetics 

BI 330/General Ecology with Laboratory 
BI 421/Toxicology with Laboratory 
BI 433/Medical Microbiology with 

Laboratory 
BI 461/Biochemistry with Laboratory 
BI 517-18/Biotechniques with Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 



B.S., Biology 

Students earning a B.S. with a major in 
biology must complete 122-123 credit hours. 
Courses include the basic biology courses 
listed earlier in this section, the core 
requirements of the university, nine of 15 
restricted electives (see listing above), 
electives, and the following required 
courses: 

Required Courses 

Choice of math courses M 115 Precalculus 
and M 117 Calculus I or M 117 Calculus I and 
M 118 Calculus II or M 127 Finite Math and 
M 228 Elementary Statistics. 



B.S., Biology/Premedical/ 
Predental/Preveterinary 

Students earning a B.S. with a major in 
biology in the premedical/predental/ 
preveterinary medical program must 
complete 124 credit hours. Course 
requirements include the basic courses listed 
earlier in this section, the core requirements 
of the university, electives, nine of the 14 
restricted electives and the required courses 
which follow: 



74 

Required Courses 

M 117/Calculus I 
M 118/Calculus II 

CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 
Laboratory 

Restricted Electives 

BI 301 /Microbiology with Laboratory 
BI 302/Bacteriology with Laboratory 
BI 303/Histology with Laboratory 
BI 304/Immunology with Laboratory 
BI 305/Developmental Biology with 

Laboratory 
BI 308/Cell Physiology with Laboratory 
BI 310A^ertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 

with Laboratory 
BI 311/Genetics 

BI 421/Toxicology with Laboratory 
BI 433/Medical Microbiology with 

Laboratory 
BI 461/Biochemistry with Laboratory 
BI 517-518/Biotechniques with Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 

Students who complete the program will 
have met the basic entrance requirements of 
virtually every U.S. college of medicine, 
dentistry and veterinary medicine. Entrance 
into these colleges is highly competitive and 
completion of the program does not 
guarantee acceptance into a medical, dental 
or veterinary rnedical college. Graduates of 
UNH have gone on to pursue M.D. degrees 
at such schools as Georgetown University, 
Tufts University, University of Connecticut; 
D.D.S. degrees at Georgetown University; 
and D.V.M. degrees at Ohio State 
University and the University of Tennessee. 

An additional opportunity for medical/ 
veterinary study involves an agreement 
between the University of New Haven and 
Ross University in Dominica that allows up 
to 15 qualified premedical/preveterinary 
students from UNH each year to complete 
simultaneously their senior year and first 
year of medical or veterinary school at Ross 
University's Schools of Medicine and 
Veterinary Medicine. UNH students have 
completed both M.D. and D.V.M. degrees 
at Ross. To qualify, students must have a 
grade point average of at least 3.0, receive a 



favorable recommendation from the 
University of New Haven's Premedical 
Advisory Committee, and apply for 
admission to Ross University at least six 
months before entrance. 



B.S., Biomedical Computing 

The biomedical computing program 
prepares students for positions requiring an 
understanding of both the biological 
sciences and computer science. The 
program investigates the changes 
computers have made in analytical and 
diagnostic methods for the biological 
sciences and explains the integration of 
computing with the biological sciences. 

Students earning a B.S. with a major in 
biomedical compuhng must complete 130 
credit hours. The courses must include the 
university's core requirements and these 
additional courses listed below: 

BI 253/Biology for Science Majors with 
Laboratory I 

BI 254/Biology for Science Majors with 
Laboratory II 

BI 308/Cell Physiology with Laboratory 

BI 310/Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 
with Laboratory 

CH 107/Elementary Organic Chemistry with 
Laboratory 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 117/General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 118/General Chemistry II Laboratory 

CS 106/Introduction to Computers: 
PASCAL, CS 226/Advanced PASCAL 
Programming and CS 230/Intensive 
FORTRAN or CS 102/Introduction to 
Computers: FORTRAN, CS 224/ 
Advanced FORTRAN Programming and 
CS 226/Advanced PASCAL Programming 

CS 334/Assembler Language or EE 475/ 
Microprocessors 

EE 21 1/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 

EE 212/Principles of Electrical Engineering II 

IE 435/Simulations and Applications 

M 117/Calculus I 

M 118/Calculus II 

M 371/Probability and Statistics 



PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 
Laboratory 

Plus 16 credit hours of biology electives 
3 credit hours of an industrial engineering 
elective 

A.S., Biology 

The associate in science degree program 
in biology is essentially the first two years of 
the bachelor of arts program in biology. 
Many students, especially those enrolled in 
the Division of Continuing Education, may 
prefer to receive the associate degree after 
the completion of the first two years of 
study. 

The A.S. degree program may be 
modified to provide the necessary 
requirements for entrance into certain types 
of professional degree programs, such as 
nursing or pharmacy. Students should meet 
with their adviser for further information 
concerning the A.S. in biology. 

Required Courses 

All students must complete 60 to 64 credit 
hours of courses to earn the associate in 
science degree with a biology major, 
including the courses listed below: 

BI 253/Biology for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 
CH 115-1 17/General Chemistry I with 

Laboratory 
CH 116-118/General Chemishy II with 

Laboratory 
Choice of any two of the following math 

courses: 
M 109/Elementary College Algebra 
M 115/Precalculus 
M 117/Calculus I 
M 228/Elementary Statistics 

Restricted Electives 

Students must complete four restricted 
electives from the following courses: 

BI 301/Microbiology with Laboratory 
BI 303/Histology with Laboratory 
BI 304/Immunology with Laboratory 



Arts and Sciences 75 

BI 305/Developmental Biology with 

Laboratory 
BI 308/Cell Physiology with Laboratory 
BI 310/Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 

with Laboratory 
BI 311/Genetics 
BI 330/General Ecology with Laboratory 

Minor in Biology 

To minor in biology, students must 
complete 20 credit hours, including those 
courses listed below. In some instances, an 
upper-level biology course can be 
substituted for general biology. 

BI 121/General and Human Biology I with 

Laboratory 
BI 122/General and Human Biology II with 

Laboratory 
or 
BI 253/Biology for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 

Plus three upper-level biology electives 
3 credit hours of biology elective 

A concentration in biology offers greater 
exposure to the study of biology than a 
minor, yet still allows the student to 
complete a major in another field. A total of 
28 credit hours is required. The subjects 
listed under the minor must be completed 
plus two other upper-level courses. 

Minor in Bioengineering 

No rigid group of courses constitutes a 
minor in bioengineering. Students wishing 
to follow such a program should major in 
one aspect of engineering and take a minor 
(20 credit hours) or a concentration (28 credit 
hours) in biology; or biology major program 
may be combined with a minor or 
concentration in engineering. Consultation 
with the particular engineering and biology 
department chairmen should be made 
before starting the program. 



76 



Minor in Nutrition 

Students who wish to minor in nutrition 
must take the following courses: 

BI 115/Nutrition and Dietetics 

BI 116/Fundamentals of Food Science 

BI 315/Nutrition and Disease 

BI 121/General and Human Biology I 

BI 122/General and Human Biology II 

or 

BI 253/Biology for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 

Plus one upper-level nutrition course. 

Environmental Science 

Environmentalists find employment in 
business, as well as in municipal, state and 
federal governmental organizations. 
Employment opportunities can be found in 
testing and control of pollutants, equipment 
sales, administration, laboratory research, 
consulting and as industrial environmental 
safety experts for those majoring in this 
field. 

Usually specialized training is necessary if 
one eventually wishes an administrative job 
at a high salary level. These programs are 
designed to enable students to enter a 
graduate or specialty school to continue 
their education. Examples of advanced 
study would be a graduate program of 
environmental science or engineering, a 
school of forestry, a program in urban 
ecology or a school of public health. 

The bachelor of science degree in 
environmental science offers concentrations 
in the following areas: air-water control and 
management, environmental health and 
community ecology. 

A master of science program in 
environmental science is offered by the 
Graduate School. More may be learned 
about this program from the Graduate 
School catalog. 



B.S., Environmental Science 

Required Courses 

All students earning a bachelor's degree 
in environmental studies must complete the 
core requirements of the university and the 
courses listed below: 

BI 135/Earth Science 

BI 253/Biology for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 
BI 301 /Microbiology with Laboratory 
BI 330/General Ecology with Laboratory 
BI 502/Fresh Water and Marine Ecology with 

Laboratory 
BI 510/General Environmental Health 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 
CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 
CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
PH 103/General Physics I 
PH 104/General Physics II 
PH 105/General Physics Laboratory I 
PH 106/General Physics Laboratory II 
SC 507/Characterization and Treatment of 

Wastes with Laboratory 
SC 513/Environmental Pollutants with 

Laboratory 

Plus 6 to 8 credit hours of biology, science or 
chemistry electives 

M 115/Precalculus and M 117/Calculus I or 
M 117/Calculus I and M 118/Calculus II 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I, CH 203/ 
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory, CH 
202/Organic Chemistry II and CH 204/ 
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 

CH 107/Organic Chemistry and CH 108/ 
Elementary Organic Chemistry 
Laboratory 

A.S., Environmental Science 

The associate's program is designed to 
lead directly into the bachelor's program if 
students wish to continue their studies. 



Evening students often prefer to obtain an 
associate's degree on their way to 
completing the requirements for the 
bachelor of science degree. The associate in 
science program provides a terminal degree 
for those who intend to work or already 
work in the environmental field, but who are 
trained in engineering, chemistry or 
business and lack the necessary background 
and training in biology and ecology required 
today in the practice of environmental 
control and management. 

Required Courses 

Students earning an associate degree in 
environmental science are required to 
complete 68 credit hours, which include first 
and second year courses from the university 
core requirements and the courses listed 
below: 

BI 253/BioIogy for Science Majors I with 

Laboratory 
BI 254/Biology for Science Majors II with 

Laboratory 
I BI 301/Microbiology with Laboratory 
BI 330/General Ecology with Laboratory 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 
CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 
CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
SC 135/Earth Science 

Plus 3 credit hours of biology elective 
Choice of mathematics courses M 115-117, 
M 117-118, or M 115-116 

Minor in Environmental 
Science 

The minor in environmental science 
provides a useful background for students 
majoring in many other areas of study if they 
have concern for the environment. For 
example, students majoring in political 
science might well combine their program 
with a minor in environmental science. 
Another useful combination is an 
environmental science minor and a major in 
business administration or engineering. 



Arts and Sciences 77 

For specific information concerning a 
minor in environmental science, please 
consult with the department chairman. 



Department of 
Chemistry and 
Chemical Engineering 

Chairman: Michael J. Saliby, Ph.D. 

Professors: Peter J. Desio, Ph.D., University 
of New Hampshire; George L. Wheeler, 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, (Jacob 
Finley Buckman Professor of Chemistry 
and Chemical Engineering) 

Associate Professors: Michael A. Collura, 
Ph.D., Lehigh University; Michael ]. 
Saliby, Ph.D., State University of New 
York at Binghamton 

This program is designed to provide a 
traditional liberal arts background with the 
basic requirements of a chemistry major. 

B.A., Chemistry 

Required Courses 

All students in the B.A. in chemistry 
program must complete 125 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements and the courses listed 
below: 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 

CH 202/Organic Chemistry 11 

CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
CH 331/Physical Chemistry I 
CH 332/Physical Chemistry II 
CH 333/Physical Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 334/Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 



78 

CH 351/Qualitative Organic Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 411/Chemical Literature 
CH 412/Seminar 

CH 501/Advanced Organic Chemistry 
CH 521/Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
CH 523/ Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Laboratory 
M117/Calculusl 
M 118/Calculus II 
M 203/Calculus III 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 

Plus 30 credit hours of electives 



B.S., A.S., Chemistry 

The B.S. and A.S. programs in chemistry 
appear in this catalog under the School of 
Engineering. 

Department of 
Communication 

Chairman: Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D. 

Professors: M.L. McLaughlin, Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin; Steven A. 

Raucher, Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Associate Professor: Jean-Richard Bodon, 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
Assistant Professor: Donald C. Smith, 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 

Amherst 
Instructor: Bruce Avery, M.A., Emerson 

College 

The communication program at the 
university allows each student to develop 
interpersonal and mass communication 
skills and awareness through a sequence of 
course offerings. 

Complete information about the bachelor 
of science degree program in communica- 
tion is listed under the School of Business 
elsewhere in this catalog. Also included are 
course listings and information concerning 
communication as a minor field of study. 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life or consult the Co-op office. 

B.A., Communication 

The University of New Haven offers a 
B.A. and a B.S. in communication. 

The bachelor of arts degree program 
carries a strong journalism and public 
relations concentration. In addition, 
interpersonal communication theory is 
emphasized, giving the student a broad 
based background in all the elements of the 
communication field. 

Required Courses 

All students in the B.A. in communication 
program must complete 121 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements and 60 credit hours of 
communication and journalism courses. 

B.S., Communication 

The university also offers a B.S. in 
communication through the School of 
Business. 

A.S., Journalism 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers 
journalism as an associate in science degree 
major. 

A curriculum built around a minor in 
journalism and a bachelor's degree major 
such as communication, English, history, 
political science, social welfare or 
environmental studies provides an excellent 
undergraduate education for a potential 
journalist. 

Internships — work on local newspapers 
for academic credit — are available for 
qualified students. 



Arts and Sciences 79 



Communication 
Certificates 



Coordinator: Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D. 

The communication department offers 
certificates in journalism and mass 
communication. Students may choose to 
take these courses on a credit or non-credit 
basis. For those students who take the non- 
credit option, it is not necessary to apply for 
admission to the university. However, if you 
are admitted, the credits earned may be 
applied toward the requirements for a 
degree program. 

Journalism Certificate 

A program designed to provide basic 
journalism skills in both print and 
broadcasting media. This certificate program 
may supplement students' experience, or 
prepare them for other areas in their current 
field of work. All students are required to 
take 15 credit hours, including the courses 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

J lOl/Journalism I 

J 201/News Writing and Reporting 

CO 309/Public Relations Writing 

Plus two courses from among the following: 

CO 302/Social Impact of Media 

CO 307/Writing for the Media 

CO 308/Broadcast Journalism 

J 202/Advanced News Writing and 

Reporting 
J 311/Copy Desk 
J 351/]ournalistic Performance 
J 367/Interpretive Editorial Writing 

Mass Communication 
Certificate 

For information on the mass 
communication certificate, see the School of 
Business section of the catalog. 



Department of 
Economics 



Chairman: Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D. 

Professors: Phillip Kaplan, Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University; Joseph A. Parker, 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Alan 
Plotnick, Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; Franklin B. Sherwood, 
Ph.D., University of Illinois; John J. Teluk, 
M.A., Free University of Munich 

Associate Professors: Gilbert McNeill, 
Ph.D., University of Geneva; Ward 
Theilman, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professors: Steven J. Shapiro, 
M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University; 
Mary Martha Woodruff, M.A., Murray 
State University, M.S., University of New 
Haven 

B.A., Economics 

Economics courses provide a basis for an 
understanding of economic structures, a 
wide range of domestic and international 
issues and trends in the life of modern 
societies. They offer training in analysis of 
economic problems as an aid to the 
evaluation of economic policies. 

Introductory courses are designed to 
provide the foundation of economic 
knowledge which every citizen in a modern 
complex society should have in order to 
understand the decisions of individual 
economic units and the operation of a 
national economy as a whole. This program 
is especially helpful for students planning to 
do graduate studies in either business or 
law. 

Required Courses 

All students in the B.A. in economics 
program must complete 121 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements and the courses listed 
below: 

A 111 /Introductory Accounting I 
A 112/Introductory Accounting II 



80 

EC 100/Economic History of the U.S. 

EC 133/Principles of Economics I 

EC 134/Principles of Economics II 

EC 311/Government Regulation of Business 

EC 340/Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 341/Macroeconomic Analysis 

EC 442/Economic Thought 

PL 222/Ethics 

QA 128/Quantitative Techniques 

SO 350/Survey Research 

Plus 9 credit hours of an elective offered by 
the economics department 

B.S., Business Economics 

The University of New Haven also offers 
a B.S. in business economics. Please see the 
School of Business section of this catalog for 
more information about the bachelor of 
science program. 

Minor in Economics 

A total of 18 credit hours of work in 
economics is required for the minor in 
economics. 

Recommended Courses 

EC 133/Principles of Economics I 
EC 134/Principles of Economics II 
EC 341/Macroeconomic Analysis 

Plus 9 credits of economics electives to be 

chosen from: 

EC 311/Government Regulation of Business 

EC 312/Contemporary Economic Problems 

EC 314/Public Finance and Budgeting 

EC 336/Money and Banking 

EC 340/Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 350/Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 440/Economic Development 



Department of 
English 

Chairman: Donald M. Smith, Ph.D. 

Director of Freshman English: Shakuntala 
Jayaswal, Ph.D. 

Professors: Srilekha Bell, Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin; Bruce A. French, Ph.D., 
New York University; Paul Marx, Ph.D., 
New York University; Nancyanne 
Carriuolo, Ph.D., State Univerity of New 
York at Buffalo; Douglas Robillard, Ph.D., 
Wayne State University; David E.E. 
Sloane, Ph.D., Duke University 

Associate Professor: Donald M. Smith, 
Ph.D., New York University 

Assistant Professors: Jeffrey Greene, Ph.D., 
University of Houston; Shakuntala 
Jayaswal, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin- 
Madison 

The study of literature is at the heart of a 
liberal education. English and American 
literature taken together comprise noble 
monuments to man's intellect and creativity. 
In addition to its generally broadening 
effect, the study of literature will help the 
student to think critically and write and 
speak more effectively. 

A major in English is looked upon very 
favorably by admissions officers of law, 
medical and dental schools. It is also good 
preparation for graduate work in such fields 
as business, education, urban planning, 
social work and public health. Employers in 
many areas of business, industry and 
government look favorably upon the college 
graduate who has both breadth of 
knowledge and the ability to communicate. 

A major in English may be taken with a 
concentration in either literature or writing; 
the two concentrations complement each 
other. The literature concentration stresses 
the development of critical appreciation of 
the great works in the English language; the 
writing concentration stresses the growth of 
the student's own skill in language use. 
Some specific areas in which this skill has 



immediate, practical worth are journalism, 
advertising, public relations, sales training 
or promotion. Many companies hire writers 
and editors for company periodicals and 
reports, equipment handbooks and service 
manuals. Publishing houses provide 
employment, of many kinds and on many 
levels, for persons skilled in writing. For 
writers of proven ability, there are 
numerous opportunities to freelance for 
trade journals, newspapers, magazines and 
other publications. 

Foreign Language Study 

While study of a foreign language is not 
required, it is strongly recommended that 
the student who majors in English know at 
least one foreign language. Knowledge of a 
foreign language makes one more sensitive 
to the use and meaning of words in one's 
own language. Furthermore, knowledge of 
a foreign language widens one's perspective 
and deepens one's understanding through 
the insights gained into another culture. 
Students who are considering graduate 
study certainly should become competent in 
at least one foreign language. 

The English Club 

The club is open to anyone associated 
with the university. Its aims are to 
encourage a greater love of good writing, to 
provide informal and diversified encounters 
with professional writers and to further the 
literary arts on campus. The English Club 
sponsors films on writers and group 
excursions to plays. 

Transfer Credit for Writing Courses 

The English department automatically 
will award credit for freshman writing 
courses taken at an accredited American 
college or university if the courses are 
essentially the same as E 105 or E 110 and if 
the student received at least a "C." If the 
courses were taken at a foreign college, the 
student will have to demonstrate his or her 
proficiency in writing before credit will be 
awarded. In the latter case, the student 
should make an appointment with the 
secretary of the English department for the 
writing of a one-hour composition. 



Arts and Sciences 81 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

The English Major 

Thirty credit hours in English beyond the 
freshman level, with the restrictions 
indicated below, must be taken for a major 
in English. All English majors must take the 
following courses: 

E 211/Early British Writers 
E 212/Modern British Writers 
E 213/Early American Writers 
E 214/Modern American Writers 

B.A. English (Literature 
Concentration) 

For the literature concentration, the 
student must take any six additional 
literature courses. 

B.A., English (Writing 
Concentration) 

For the writing concentration, the student 
must take the following writing courses: 

E 220/Writing for Business and Industry 
E 225/Technical Writing and Presentation 
E 250/Expository Writing 
E 261/The Essay 
E 267/Creative Writing I 
E 268/Creative Writing II 
E 480/Internship (may be substituted for one 
of the writing courses) 

Minor in Writing 

A total of 18 credit hours is required for 
the minor in writing. 

Required Courses 

12 credit hours of writing courses. 
6 credit hours of literature courses. 



82 

Minor in Literature 

A total of 18 credit hours in literature 
courses is required for the minor in 
literature. 

Department of History 

Chairman: Edmund N. Todd, Ph.D. 

Professor: Joseph B. Chepaitis,Ph.D., 
Georgetown University; Robert Glen, 
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Associate Professor: Edmund N. Todd, III, 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

History provides a framework for a liberal 
education. The study of human 
experience — failures as well as 
achievements — is the core of historical 
study. It gives insight into related disciplines 
in the humanities and social sciences and 
broadens the perspective of students in 
professional fields of business and 
engineering by revealing the complexity and 
interrelatedness of human experience. 

History is also excellent preparation for a 
variety of careers in business, government, 
law, journalism, foreign service and many 
other areas. Because of the great variety of 
professional programs at the University of 
New Haven, the student interested in 
history can combine this interest with highly 
technical professional training. 

The department strives to meet its 
objectives by teaching not only content but 
critical and writing skills through reading, 
class presentation and discussion, research 
and writing. Historical methodology is 
stressed in all advanced courses, and 
students take the history seminar in their 
senior year to sharpen their critical and 
analytical skills. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

The University of New Haven has a 
chapter of the International Honor Society in 
History, Phi Alpha Theta, which is open to 
those students who have had 12 hours of 
history or more and have maintained an 



average of better than 3.0 in history courses 
and better than 2.90 overall. The university 
chapter of Phi Alpha Theta provides the 
students and faculty with a social and 
intellectual experience beyond classroom 
work, offering films, speakers and 
roundtable discussions. Students not 
eligible for membership in the society are 
welcome to participate in all of the chapter's 
activities. 

B.A., History 

All students in the B.A. in history 
program must complete 121 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements and 36 credit hours of 
history courses, including those listed 
below. The balance of the program can be 
arranged in consultation with an adviser. 

The department offers specific area 
studies that include American studies, 
European studies and economic history. A 
student who wishes to pursue one of these 
areas should consult with an adviser for 
specific requirements. 

Required Courses 

HS 101 /Foundations of the Western World 
HS 102/The Western World in Modern 

Times 
HS 491/Senior Seminar 
HS 211/United States History to 1865 and 
HS 212/United States History from 1865 
or 
HS 110/ American History from 1607 and 

Any other United States history course 

excluding HS 211 and HS 212 

Plus one upper-division history elective 
one upper-division course in both 
European and American history 

Minor in History 

A total of 18 credit hours in history is 
required for a minor in history. These 
courses must include two of those listed 
below and may include any other 
combination of four courses in history that 
supports the student's interests and needs. 



Required Courses 

HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 

and 
HS 102/The Western World in Modem 

Times 
or 
HS 105/Foundations of Economic History 

and 
HS 106/Modern Economic History 

Department of 
Mathematics 

Chairman: Donald Fridshal, Ph.D. 

Coordinator of Precalculus Mathematics: 

Shirley Wakin, Ph.D. 

Professors: Donald Fridshal, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; Richard B. 
Jones, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University; Erik 
Rosenthal, Ph.D., University of 
California; Baldev K. Sachdeva, Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University; Bruce 
Tyndall, M.S., University of Iowa; James 
W. Uebelacker, Ph.D., Syracuse 
University; Shirley Wakin, Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts; W. Thurmon 
Whitley, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University. 

Assistant Professors: Ramesh Sharma, 
Ph.D., University of Windsor, Ph.D., 
Banaras Hindu University; Paul E. Vitalo, 
Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology. 

The study of mathematics opens the door 
to a wide variety of career opportunities and 
academic pursuits. Mathematics is a major 
part of the framework of modern science and 
technology. Persons with strong 
mathematics backgrounds qualify for 
stimulating occupations in an ever 
increasing number of fields, from private 
industry to government service. 

The mathematics department offers 
flexible programs in mathematics and 



Arts and Sciences 83 

applied mathematics with concentrations in 
computer science, statistics, natural sciences 
and mathematics. Students who do not take 
the computer science concentration are 
encouraged to consider a minor in computer 
science to be better prepared for our 
technological society. Students also may 
minor in mathematics. 

Mathematics students have direct access 
to a departmental microcomputer, the 
university's Data General MV/8000 
computer via numerous terminals 
distributed throughout the campus and the 
Personal Computer Laboratories. 

Mathematics Club 

The department of mathematics sponsors 
the Mathematics Club, which is open to all 
university students. The club provides 
students and faculty the opportunity to 
participate together outside the classroom, 
in the study of mathematics and its 
applications. Topics range from the serious 
application of mathematics to society, to 
avocations such as mathematically-based 
puzzles and games. Typical activities of the 
club include guest lectures, field trips, films 
and social events. 

Honorary Memberships 

Each year, the mathematics department 
awards to outstanding mathematics 
students free honorary memberships in the 
Mathematical Association of America and 
Society for Industrial and Applied 
Mathematics. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 



84 

Basic Courses Required for All 
Mathematics Majors 

All students earning a bachelor's degree 
in mathematics must complete the 
university core requirements, the course 
requirements for their particular math 
program, and the basic math courses listed 
below: 

M 117/Calculus I 

M 118/Calculus II 

M 203/Calculus III 

M 204/Differential Equations 

M 270/Discrete Structures 

M 311/Linear Algebra 

M 361/Mathematical Modeling 

M 371/Probability and Statistics I 

Mathematics majors are strongly urged to 
consider the courses listed below, either as 
electives or as core curriculum courses: 

HU 300/The Nature of Science 
PL 240/Philosophy of Science 
SO 350/Survey Research 

Refer to the university core requirements 
listed earlier in this catalog for the balance of 
courses needed. 

B.A., Mathematics 

This program is designed to provide 
students with a broad overview of 
mathematics and its applications, especially 
for students who wish to study pure 
mathematics, or for those whose career 
objectives include mathematics education or 
the application of mathematics to such fields 
as business, economics, the social sciences 
and actuarial science. 

Students earning a B.A. with a 
mathematics major must complete a 
minimum 124 credit hours. These courses 
must include the basic courses required for 
all mathematics majors, which are listed 
above, the university core requirements 
listed earlier in this catalog, and the courses 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

M 321/Modern Algebra 
M 491/Departmental Seminar 
CS 106/Introduction to Programming: 
PASCAL 



Plus 6 credit hours of mathematics, 
compatible with area of concentration, 
M 300 series or above; 8 credit hours of 
natural science with laboratories in two 
semester sequence 

B.S. Applied Mathematics 
(Computer Science 
Concentration)* 

This program is primarily for students 
interested in using computing techniques to 
solve mathematical problems in a wide 
variety of disciplines. In addition to the 
mathematics requirements, students take 
eight or nine courses in computer science 
designed to provide training in the structure 
of computer languages, computing 
machines and computing systems. 

Students in this program must complete a 
minimum of 125 credit hours. These courses 
must include the basic courses required for 
all mathematics majors, which are listed 
above, the university core requirements 
listed earlier in this catalog, and the courses 
listed below: 

M 338/Numerical Analysis 

M 472/Probability and Statistics II 

CS 106/Introduction to Programming: 

PASCAL 
CS 226/ Advanced Programming and Data 

Structures/Pascal 
CS 237/Data Structures and Algorithms 
CS 320/Operating Systems 
CS 334/Machine Organization/Assembly 

Language 
CS 338/Structure of Programming 

Languages 

Plus 6 credit hours in computer science; 
6 credit hours in mathematics, chemistry 
or physics; 3 credit hours in computer 
science, chemistry or physics 

*This program is currently pending licensure by the 
Connecticut State Board of Higher Education. 



B.S., Applied Mathematics 
(Natural Sciences 
Concentration)* 

This program is primarily for students 
whose mathematical interests are in the 
application of mathematics to such fields as 
physics, chemistry, statistics, operations 
research and engineering. In addition to the 
courses listed below, the students take five 
to seven courses in a single discipline of the 
natural sciences or engineering. 

Students in this program must complete a 
minimum of 125 credit hours. These courses 
must include the basic courses required for 
all mathematics majors, which are listed 
above, the university core requirements 
listed earlier in this catalog, and the courses 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

M 321/Modern Algebra 

M 338/Numerical Analysis 

M 491/Departmental Seminar 

IE 106/Introduction to Computers: Pascal 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Plus 6 credit hours of mathematics, 
compatible with area of concentration, 
M 300 series or above 

. B.S., Applied Mathematics 
(Statistics Concentration)* 

This program is designed to provide 
students with a background in mathematical 
statistics. The mathematics courses required 
are basic courses necessary to enable a 
person to gain employment as a statistician 
in business or government, or to pursue 
graduate study in statistics. These courses 
are also necessary for students wishing to 
pursue careers in the actuarial field. 

Students in this program must complete a 
minimum of 125 credit hours. These courses 
include the basic courses required for all 
mathematics courses which are listed above. 



Arts and Sciences 85 
the university core requirements listed 
earlier in the catalog, and the courses listed 
below. 

Required Courses 

M 303/ Advanced Calculus 

M 338/Numerical Analysis 

M 472/Probability and Statistics II 

M 473/Advanced Statistical Inference 

M 481/Linear Models I 

M 482/Linear Models II 

M 491/Departmental Seminar 

CS 106/Introduction to Programming: 

PASCAL 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Plus 6 additional credit hours in mathematics 
courses numbered M 300 or above; 
6 credit hours in science or computer 
science 

Minor in Mathematics 

Students may minor in mathematics by 
completing six mathematics courses 
approved by the department. Those 
students contemplating a minor in 
mathematics should consult with the 
department as early as possible in their 
academic careers as to the choice and 
availability of courses. 

Required Courses 

M 118/Calculus II 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 311/Linear Algebra 

Plus 9 credit hours of mathematics courses 
which complement the major area of 
interest 

Recommended Courses 

M 204/Differential Equations 
M 270/Discrete Structures or any course in 
the M 300 series or above 



*77iis program is currently pending licensure by the 
Connecticut State Board of Higher Education. 



86 



Department of 
Physics 



Chairman: Kee W. Chun, Ph.D. 

Professors: Kee W. Chun, Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania; Richard C. Morrison, 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Physics is concerned with the most basic 
aspects of our knowledge of the natural 
world. It is a subject in which experiment 
and theory evolve constantly to provide a 
precise and simple description of the 
physical phenomena around us in terms of 
a relatively small number of physical laws 
and theories. 

As a fundamental science, physics is at the 
root of almost all branches of science and 
technology. It has provided the microscopic 
basis for chemistry, has stimulated 
important developments in mathematics, is 
the basis of most branches of engineering, 
and, during the past decade, has proved to 
be increasingly valuable to the life sciences. 

Consequently, a basic knowledge of 
physics is excellent preparation for diverse 
careers: research in university and 
government laboratories, industrial research 
and development, applied science and 
engineering, biological and medical 
sciences, research in environmental 
problems, and teaching at all levels from the 
elementary school to the university. It also 
prepares students for careers in non- 
physics-related fields such as philosophy, 
business and law. 

The department offers B.A. and B.S. 
degrees in physics. Degree requirements are 
kept flexible to allow each physics major to 
tailor a program suited to individual career 
interests. The department strives to provide 
a well-balanced, four-year program 
emphasizing both the theoretical and the 
experimental in the broad areas of classical 
and modern physics. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 



education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

B.A., B.S., Physics 

All students in the B.A. or B.S. in physics 
program must complete at least 120 credit 
hours. These courses must include the 
university core requirements, the course 
requirements for their particular physics 
program and the courses listed below. The 
balance of the program will be worked out 
in consultation with a faculty adviser. 

Required Courses 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
PH 211/Modern Physics 
PH 270/Thermal Physics 
PH 280/Lasers 

PH 301/Analytical Mechanics 
PH 351/Intermediate Electricity and 

Magnetism 
PH 373/ Advanced Laboratory 
PH 404/Senior Project 
PH 415/Nuclear Physics 
PH 451/Elementary Quantum Mechanics 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 
CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 
M 117/Calculus I 
M 118/Calculus II 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 

Plus 6 credit hours of computer 

programming electives; 6 credit hours of 
mathematics electives; 9 credit hours of 
physics electives 

Minor in Physics 

A total of 20 credit hours of work in 
physics is required for the minor in physics. 
Students may select from the courses listed 
below or plan their program in consultation 
with a faculty adviser. 



Required Courses 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
PH 211/Modern Physics 

Plus 9 credit hours of advanced physics 

Department of 
Political Science 

Chairman: James Dull, Ph.D. 

Professors: Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D., 
Columbia University; James Dull, Ph.D., 
Columbia University; Joshua H. 
Sandman, Ph.D., New York University 

Associate Professor: Natalie J. Ferringer, 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

A major in political science provides the 
student with a foundation for a career in 
government on the local, state, national and 
international levels; for a career in law; for 
graduate school programs in political 
science, international relations and public 
policy; and for careers in the areas of 
campaign management, communication, 
public relations and business. All political 
science and pre-law majors or minors should 
discuss career goals and educational 
objectives with a department adviser within 
one month of entrance into the program. 

Further, advice on the Law School 
Admissions Test (LSAT) and the Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) preparation 
courses, which our pre-law and graduate 
school-oriented students are urged to take, 
is available through the department. 

Pre-law majors and minors in the 
department of political science have been 
especially successful in gaining entrance to 
law schools throughout the country. 

The political science faculty grants the 
Rollin G. Osterweis Award for Excellence in 
Political Science each year to the outstanding 
student in the political science major. 



Arts and Sciences 87 

B.A., Political 
Science 

All students in the B. A. in political science 
program must complete 124 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements and 48 credit hours of 
political science courses, including those 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

PS 121/American Government and Politics 
PS 122/State and Local Government and 

Politics 
PS 241/International Relations 
PS 261/Modern Polihcal Analysis 
PS 281, 282, 283, 285/(one) Comparative 

Government 
PS 304, 308, 309/(one) Political Parties, 

Legislative Process, Presidency 
PS 332/Constitutional Law (pre-law majors) 
PS 461/Political Theory: Ancient and 

Medieval 
PS 462/Political Theory: Modern and 

Contemporary 
PS 499 (or PS 500) Senior Seminar 

Plus 18-21 hours of political science electives 
to be chosen with student's departmental 
adviser. 



The Institute of Law 
and Public Affairs 

Director: Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D. 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs has 
been established to provide undergraduates 
with specific training in the areas of the 
paralegal profession, public policy, and 
public affairs. Students with an 
undergraduate major in any of the schools 
of the university may attain parapro- 
fessional status in legal affairs or public 
affairs by completing a minor in the 
institute. The term paraprofessional applies 
to those with special training in a 
professional field but who do not yet possess 
the terminal degree normally required in the 



88 



profession. In many instances, parapro- 
fessional status is a step toward the 
accomplishment of the final degree. 

Paralegal Studies 
Certificate 

A certificate in paralegal studies is issued 
to students who complete 18 credit hours of 
paralegal courses. The certificate is normally 
supported by courses in the area of political 
science as well as psychology and sociology. 
The required courses are listed below. 

Required Courses 

PS 238/Legal Procedure I 

PS 240/Legal Bibliography and Resources 

(prerequisite for PS 440) 
PS 440/Legal Research 

Plus 9 additional credit hours from the 
courses in the Institute of Law and Public 
Affairs. Institute courses are designated 
by a dagger (t) in the course descriptions 
section. 

Certificate in Public Policy 
(Campaign Management) 

A certificate in public policy is issued to 
students who complete 18 credit hours of 
courses in areas of public affairs designed to 
serve the student's intellectual and 
professional needs. An example is the 
program in campaign management. 

Required Courses 

PS 121/American Government and Politics 

Plus 5 of the following: 

PS 224/Public Attitudes and Public Policy 

PS 340/Campaign Management: Procedures 

and Operations 
PS 341/Campaign Managment: Structure 

and Organization 
PS 344/Campaign Management: Survey 

Research, Polling, Computers 
PS 346/Campaign Management: Financing 

and Election Laws 
PS 450/Campaign Managerrj^nt: Internship 
Plus related elective courses are available. 



Minor in Legal Affairs 

The legal affairs minor in the Institute of 
Law and Public Affairs prepares students for 
positions as office managers, administrative 
assistants, legal investigators, public policy 
research assistants, public policy library 
assistants and legislative researchers in 
private and public law firms and 
governmental agencies. Students acquire 
specific skills which will enable them to do 
important legal work under the supervision 
of practicing attorneys. The legal affairs 
minor also prepares students for positions 
and clerkships in the law libraries of the 
state. Courses are selected in consultation 
with a faculty adviser. 

Minor in Political Science 

A student may minor in political science 
by completing 18 credit hours in the 
program, including those courses listed 
below: 

Required Courses 

PS 121/American Government and Politics 
PS 122/State and Local Government and 
Politics 

Plus 12 credit hours of political science 
courses chosen in conjunction with a 
department adviser. These courses 
should be related to the area of student 
interest and concentration such as pre- 
law, international relations, campaign 
management. 

Minor in Black Studies 

The Black studies minor is an 
interdisciplinary program offered in the 
School of Arts and Sciences in which the 
department of political science participates. 
The minor consists of courses in political 
science, English, history, humanities and 
world music. A student may minor in this 
program by completing 18 credit hours 
including courses selected from the listing 
below: 

Suggested Courses 

HS 120/History of Blacks in America 
MU 112/Introduction to World Music 



Arts and Sciences 89 



MU 550/Studies in Urban Ethnic Music 

P 321 /Social Psychology 

PS 205/The Politics of the Black Movement 

in America 
SO 114/Contemporary Social Problems 
SO 315/Social Change 
SO 400/Minority Group Relations 
SO 410/Urban Sociology 

Minor in Public Affairs 

The public affairs minor in the Institute of 
Law and Public Affairs is directed towards 
providing training for civil service positions 
at all levels of government. The goal of such 
training is to provide more effective public 
administrators and to introduce creativity 
into the profession of public service. The 
public affairs minor will take a problem- 
solving approach to the discipline as 
students will be conducting basic, in-depth 
research on problems of governmental 
agencies. Students in this minor will be able 
to develop valuable insights into the nature 
of the public policy process from the vantage 
point of the bureaucracy. 

Courses are selected in consultation with 
a faculty adviser. 



Department of 
Psychology 

Chairman: Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D. 

Professors: Robert D. Dugan, Ph.D., Ohio 
State University; Robert J. Hoffnung, 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; Arnold 
Hyman, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; 
Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D., Brown 
University; Michael Morris, Ph.D., Boston 
College; Michael W. York, Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

Associate Professor: Gordon R. Simerson, 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Assistant Professor: Susan K. Boardman, 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Psychology faces the questions that are of 
most immediate concern to the individual: 
problems such as personal identity, the 



social context, normalcy versus deviance 
and behavior change. As a science, 
psychology is devoted to the under- 
standing, prediction and control of 
behavior. 

Our dedication to these goals requires that 
we study behavior from a number of 
viewpoints — development, learning, social, 
physiological, abnormal personality — each 
fascinating in its own right. The student's 
attention also is drawn to the many settings 
in which behavior occurs, from the family to 
the laboratory, from the clinic to the 
marketplace. This great diversity ensures 
that the study of psychology will interrelate 
well with other courses in the humanities 
and sciences. 

The undergraduate program in the 
department of psychology combines basic 
science and applications to prepare students 
for further professional training in 
psychology or for careers in human services 
delivery, law, education, business and 
industry. 

The program features specialty 
concentrations in community-clinical 
psychology and industrial/organizational 
psychology for those students who have 
well-defined professional goals. The general 
psychology concentration permits students 
to tailor their preparation toward other 
specialty areas. Psychology majors are 
encouraged to broaden their preparation by 
taking courses or minors in sociology, 
political science, social welfare, manage- 
ment, computer science, criminal justice, 
mathematics and biology. 

The psychology major develops skills in 
design and analysis of research and effective 
communication through the study of 
statistics, experimental methods, 
psychological measurement and 
psychological theory. Through involvement 
with behavior therapy and community 
psychology field work, the student can 
confront behavior problems in a more direct, 
practical fashion. The department feels that 
it is only through a thorough grounding in 
basic skills and principles that students can 
effectively realize their goals. 

The psychology program benefits from a 
psychology laboratory building on the main 



90 



campus. The laboratory contains facilities for 
student and faculty research with human 
and animal subjects. Specialized apparatus 
permits the study of human and animal 
learning, sensory capacities, social processes 
and biofeedback control. 

The University of New Haven also offers 
the master of arts degree in community 
psychology and industrial/organizational 
psychology as well as a senior professional 
certificate in applications of psychology. For 
descriptions of these programs, see the 
Graduate School catalog. 

Psychology Club 

Students in psychology have the 
opportunity to participate in the Psychology 
Club. Its purpose is to provide opportunities 
both to socialize and to develop students' 
interests in the science and profession of 
psychology. Throughout the year, the club 
sponsors guest lecturers and a variety of 
field trips. All students are welcome to join. 

Psi Chi Honor Society 

Membership in the university chapter of 
Psi Chi, the national honor society, is open 
to students in the top 35 percent of their class 
who have completed at least nine credit 
hours of psychology with grades of B or 
better, and who are making the study of 
psychology one of their major interests. 

Graduating seniors also may nominate 
themselves for the annually-awarded 
McGough psychology prize. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practice, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

B.A., Psychology 

The B.A. in psychology program requires 
the complehon of 120 credits, 43 of which 
are required to complete the major. 



Required Courses 

P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 

P 301/Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 

P 305/Experimental Methods in Psychology 

P 306/Psychology Laboratory 

P 315/Human and Animal Learning 

P 341/Psychological Theory 

The required courses comprise 19 credit 
hours of the 43 required for the major. To 
complete the major, students must complete 
9 credit hours of psychology restricted 
electives and one of the three 15 credit hour 
concentrations described below. P 211 The 
Psychology of Effective Living, cannot be 
taken to satisfy major requirements. 

The psychology restricted electives are 
selected by the student in consultation with 
the academic adviser. Suggested electives 
for the community-clinical concentration 
are: P 316, P 321, P 331, P 332, P 351, P 361, 
P 370. Suggested electives for the industrial/ 
organizational concentration are: P 316, 
P 336, P 351, P 361, P 370. 

Psychology majors are required to take a 
number of courses in other departments, 
some of which satisfy university core 
curriculum requirements: BI 121 and BI 122 
General and Human Biology I and II; M 127 
Finite Mathematics; SO 113 Sociology; one 
literature and one philosophy elective, one 
of which must be from the core curriculum 
approved course list. 

It should be noted that M 127, P 301 and 
P 305 constitute a sequence of courses 
incorporating computer use. Those courses 
satisfy the core curriculum computer literacy 
requirement and must be taken in that 
order. 

Community-Clinical 
Psychology Concentration 

P 216/Psychology of Human Development 
P 330/Introduction to Community 

Psychology 
P 336/ Abnormal Psychology 
P 350/Human Assessment 
P 375/Foundations of Clinical/Counseling 

Psychology 



Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology Concentration 

P 212/Business and Industrial Psychology 
P 321/Social Psychology 
P 350/Human Assessment 
P 355/Organizational Behavior 
P 356/Psychology of Training and 
Development 

General Psychology 
Concentration 

The general psychology concentration 
consists of 15 credit hours of psychology 
electives beyond the required courses. 

Minor in Psychology 

Psychology, perhaps more than any other 
subject, relates closely to many other 
disciplines. A minor in psychology prepares 
you for graduate study in the field and can 
add another dimension to your studies in 
other programs at the university. A total of 
six courses is required for a minor in 
psychology. 

Required Courses 

P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 

P 301 /Statistics for Behavioral Sciences (with 

laboratory) 
P 305/Experimental Methods in Psychology 

Plus 9 additional credits of psychology 
electives 

There are two exceptions to the minor 
program described above: Business students 
whose programs require QA 216 Probability 
and Statistics will be permitted to substitute 
QA 216 for P 301; and students whose 
programs require SO 350 Social Survey 
Research, may substitute another 
psychology course for P 305. It should be 
noted that P 21 1 The Psychology of Effective 
Living, cannot be used to satisfy the 
requirements for the psychology minor. 



Arts and Sciences 91 

Department of 
Sociology 

Chairman: Walter Jewell, Ph.D. 

Professors: Faith H. Eikaas, Ph.D., Syracuse 
University; Walter Jewell, Ph.D., Harvard 
University; Allen L. Sack, Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

Associate Professor: Judith Bograd Gordon, 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Sociology is the study of social life and the 
social causes and consequences of human 
behavior. Sociology's subject matter ranges 
from analysis of families, corporations, cities 
and sports to sexuality, death, race, gender 
and ethnicity as well as the impact of 
demographic and environmental policies 
and other social phenomena. The 
sociological perspective is empirically 
grounded and sufficiently broad to be 
relevant to those considering careers in 
related fields such as research, 
governmental service, social work, 
personnel management, advertising, law, 
medicine, journalism, social gerontology 
and travel and tourism. 

Career preparation is one focus of the 
department. Students will select or be 
assigned an academic adviser. Together 
they design a personalized program to meet 
student needs and career goals. Whether the 
student's interest is in understanding and 
appreciating theories and methods of 
sociology for their own sake or in specific 
career preparation, a major in sociology will 
be of great benefit for students who become 
engaged both in understanding their own 
social worlds and the global world of which 
they are a part. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practice, paid work 
experience in your career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 



92 

B.A., Sociology 

All students in the B.A. in sociology 
program must complete 121 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core requirements listed earlier in the catalog 
and 33 credit hours of sociology courses, 
including the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

SO 113/Sociology 

SO 114/Social Problems or SO 214 Deviance 
SO 218/Community 
SO 221/Cultural Anthropology 
SO 250/Research Methods 
SO 413/Social Theory 
SO 440/Senior Seminar 
SO 501-502/Practicum or SW 401-402 
Fieldwork 

Plus 8 restricted electives (student may 
choose to take both SO 114 and SO 214) 
selected in consultation with the academic 
adviser. 

Core curriculum computer literacy 
requirement: M 127, P 301 or M 228, 
SO 350 

Minor in Sociology 

Students must take 18 credit hours to 
minor in sociology. Students should consult 
with a faculty adviser to select the nine credit 
hours of unspecified sociology courses. The 
adviser will suggest a combination of 
courses which focus on the student's 
interests and concerns. The required courses 
are listed below: 

Required Courses 

SO 113/Sociology 

SO 250/Research Methods 

SO 413/Social Theory 

Plus 9 credit hours of sociology (two at the 
300-level or above, selected with your 
adviser) 

Social Service Concentration 

The concentration in social services 
focuses on integrating a student's 
knowledge of the social service system, 
human behavior and the social 



environment, the social work profession, 
social research, practice skills and field 
experience in preparation for entry-level 
social service positions in a variety of 
settings and institutions. The concentration 
is sufficiently flexible so students acquire the 
basic knowledge and skills of the social work 
profession, but have an opportunity to 
sample other career paths as well. The 
concentration is particularly suitable for 
students who are preparing for graduate 
professional education in social work as well 
as those interested in community service, 
counseling, gerontology, law, urban 
planning and health-service administration. 

An academic adviser will work closely 
with the student in suggesting electives 
which complement the personal needs and 
professional goals of the student. In addition 
to the courses required for the sociology 
major, this concentration requires the 
following courses: 

Required Courses 

SW 220/Introduction to Social Welfare 
SW 340/Group Dynamics or CJ 301 Group 

Dynamics 
SO 333/ Aging 
SW 415-16/Methods of Intervention I and II 

Minor in Anthropology 

Students must take 18 credit hours to 
minor in anthropology. It is imperative that 
students consult with a faculty adviser to 
plan a program of courses that focus on 
anthropological issues and practices. The 
required courses are listed below: 

Required Courses 

SO 220/Physical Anthropology and 

Archaeology 
SO 221/Cultural Anthropology 
SO 250/Research Methods or SO 450 

Research Seminar 

Plus 9 credit hours of anthropology-relevant 
courses selected with the assistance of the 
academic adviser. 



Department of Visual 
and Performing Arts 
and Philosophy 

Chairman: Michael G. Kaloyanides, Ph.D. 

Professors: Ralf E. Carriuolo, Ph.D., 

Wesleyan University; Michael G. 

Kaloyanides, Ph.D., Wesleyan 

University; Elizabeth Moffitt, M.A., 

Hunter College, City University of New 

York 
Associate Professor: Joel H. Marks, Ph.D., 

University of Connecticut 
Assistant Professor: Edward J. Maffeo, 

Ph.D., New York University 
Instructor: Albert G. Celotto, M.M., Indiana 

University 
Acting Director of Theatre: Joan Robbins, 

M.F.A., Yale University 
Practitioners-in-Residence: Sharon Carter 

Matthews, M.Arch., Yale University; 

Henry E. Rosenberg, Ph.D., Clark 

University 

Fine and Applied Arts 

Coordinator: Elizabeth Moffitt, B.F.A., 
M.A. 

Study of the visual arts provides an 
opportunity for self-realization and gives the 
individual a perception of his relationship to 
society. Foundation courses in the basics of 
two- and three-dimensional design, color 
and drawing, plus work in such major 
disciplines as painting and sculpture, 
provide the student with the necessary 
vocabulary for effective visual 
communication. 

Knowledge of the development of art 
throughout man's cultural evolution from 
the cave era to present day, is provided 
through studies in art history and the 
contemporary art scene. Thus, equipped 
with a working vocabulary of visual form 
and a sense of art history, the student 
progresses toward the goal of making a 
mature visual statement in his or her 
chosen field. 



Arts and Sciences 93 

University of New Haven art programs 
provide preparation for graduate study or 
career opportunities in the fields of fine arts, 
graphic design, interior design, architecture 
and photography. 

Students in all B.A. art programs listed 
below must complete at least 121 credit 
hours. These courses must include the core 
requirements for the university and the 
required courses as listed for each program. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

B.A., Art 

This program is designed to assist the 
student in discovering his or her potential 
for creative expression in the plastic arts and 
the development of a personal idiom in the 
disciplines of his or her own choosing 
including painting, sculpture, drawing, 
printmaking, etc. Acquisition of an effective 
visual vocabulary is promoted by 
foundation courses in two- and three- 
dimensional design, color and drawing. Art 
historical studies provide perspective on the 
art forms of the past. 

The program prepares the student for 
graduate study in art as well as for career 
opportunities in a broad spectrum of art and 
art-related fields. 

Required Courses 

AT 101/Introduction to Studio Art I 

AT 102/Introduction to Studio Art II 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 201/Painting I 

AT 202/Painting II 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT211/BasicDesignI 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 231/Art History I 



94 



AT 232/Art History II 
AT 304/Sculpture I 
AT 305/Sculpture II 
AT 315/Printmaking 
AT 302/Figure Drawing 
AT 401/Studio Seminar I 
AT 402/Studio Seminar II 

Plus art history elective 

B.A., Graphic Design 

Graphic design, the art of visual 
communication through words and 
pictures, is an expanding discipline in 
current society. Posters, publications, 
identity systems, graphs, diagrams, 
information design, signage and exhibits are 
components of the visual environment we 
live in. The graphic designer's duty is to 
bring clarity and visual aesthetics to 
communications through an understanding 
of theory, design practice and technology. 

The introductory courses in the graphic 
design program concentrate on basic design 
vocabulary, composition, color perception, 
drawing and photography. The junior and 
senior year education focuses on 
typographic studies, illustration, critical 
analysis, problem solving methodology and 
complex applied design projects, preparing 
the students for entry level graphic design 
positions in design studios, corporations 
and agencies, as well as for graduate studies 
in the field. 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 122/Graphic Design Production 

AT 201/Painting 

AT 203/Graphic Design I 

AT 204/Graphic Design II 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT 211/Basic Design (two-dimensional) 

AT 212/Basic Design (three-dimensional) 

AT 213/Color 

AT 221/Typography I 

AT 222/Typography II 

AT 231/History of Art 

AT 232/History of Art II or art history elective 

AT 309/Photo Design 



AT 315/Printmaking 

AT 322/Illustration 

AT 401/Studio Seminar I (in Graphic Design) 

AT 402/Studio Seminar II (in Graphic 

Design) 
AT 599/Independent Senior Project 
MK 307/ Advertising and Promotion 

B.A., Graphic Design 
(Photography Concentration) 

Practitioner-in-Residence: Henry 
Rosenberg, Ph.D. 

The photography concentration under the 
graphic design program equips the student 
with a strong interest in photography with 
the necessary technical training to compete 
successfully as a professional in the fields of 
commercial and industrial photography, 
graphic design, etc. At the same time, the 
student's creative powers are developed 
through basic foundation art courses 
permitting an approach to both 
photography and graphic design as art 
forms. 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 122/Graphic Design Production 

AT 201/Painting I 

AT 203/Graphic Design I 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 221/Typography I 

AT 231/History of Art I 

AT 232/History of Art II 

AT 309/Photo Design 

AT 315/Printmaking 

AT 401/Studio Seminar I 

AT 402/Shidio Seminar II 

AT 599/Independent Study 

MK 307/ Advertising and Promotion 



Photography Concentration 

AT 210/Photography II 
AT 225/Photographic Methods 
AT 310/Photographic Lighting 
AT 311/Color Photography 
AT 599/Independent Study 

B.A., Interior Design 

Practitioner-in-Residence: Sharon Carter 

Matthews, M.Arch. 

Studies in the interior design programs 
are organized to focus on the technology of 
a built environment, programming and 
three-dimensional composition. Students 
explore the relationship between interior 
designers and their clients, the interaction 
between designers and architects and 
methods of communication between 
designers and fabricators. In addition to 
interior design problems, students are given 
the opportunity to develop their studio art 
skills and their presentation techniques. 
Core course work includes architectural 
drawing, building construction, color 
theory, history of interior design and textile 
design. 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 201/Painting I 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 21 6/ Architectural Drawing 

AT 231/History of Art I 

AT 232/History of Art II 

AT 233/History of Architecture and Interior 

Design 
AT 302/Figure Drawing 
AT 304/Sculpture I 
AT 317/Interior Design 
AT 322/Illustration 
AT 331/Contemporary Art 
AT 401/Studio Seminar I (in Interior Design) 
AT 402/Studio Seminar II (in Interior Design) 
CE 302/Building Construction 



Arts and Sciences 95 

Recommended Electives 

AT 203/Graphic Design 

AT 309/Photographic Design 

A.S., Graphic Design 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT 211/Basic Design I (two-dimensional) 

AT 212/Basic Design II (three-dimensional) 

AT 213/Color 

AT 122/Graphic Design Production 

AT 221/Typography I 

AT 222/Typography II 

AT 309/Photo Design 

A.S., Graphic Design 
(Photography Concentration) 

The A.S. photography concentration 
requires all the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 122/Graphic Design Production 

AT 203/Graphic Design I 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 221/Typography I 

AT 309/Photo Design 

Photography Concentration 

AT 210/Photography 11 
AT 225/Photographic Methods 
AT 310/Photographic Lighting 
AT 311/Color Photography 



96 



B.A., Interior Design 
(Pre- Architecture 
Concentration) 

Practitioner-in-Residence: Sharon Carter 
Matthews, M.Arch. 

The pre-architecture concentration 
provides a thorough preparation for 
students planning to enter a professional 
degree program at the graduate school level. 
It also provides architecturally oriented 
training for those who might wish to seek 
employment in this and related areas such 
as city planning or landscape design. Liberal 
arts, technological studies and studio arts 
are carefully integrated into a balanced 
curriculum. Students gain insight into the 
relationship between architects and clients, 
investigate the nature of building and 
develop skills in presentation methods. 
Course work includes the history of 
architecture, architectural drawing, building 
construction, appropriate civil engineering 
studies and studio art courses in color and 
design. 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 106/Basic Drawing II 

AT 201/Painting I 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 2 16/ Architectural Drawing 

AT 231/History of Art I 

AT 232/History of Art II 

AT 253/History of Architecture and Interior 

Design 
AT 302/Figure Drawing 
AT 304/Sculpture I 
AT 317/Interior Design 
AT 322/Illustration 
AT 531/Contemporary Art 
AT 401/Shidio Seminar I (in Pre- 

Architecture) 
AT 402/Studio Seminar II (in Pre- 

Architecture) 
CE 302/Building Construction 
CE 403/City Planning 
M 115/Pre-Calculus 



M 117/Calculus 

PH 100/Introductory Physics with 
Laboratory 

A.S., Interior Design 

Required Courses 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 213/Color 

AT 216/ Architectural Drawing 

AT 233/History of Architecture and Interior 

Design 
AT 302/Figure Drawing 
AT 317/Interior Design 
AT 322/Illustration 
AT 304/Sculpture I 
AT 331/Contemporary Art 
CE 302/Building Construction 

Minor in Art 

A total of 18 credit hours of work in art is 
required for the minor in art. Students may 
take the courses listed below and any other 
combination of courses that fills their needs 
and interests. 

Recommended Courses 

AT 211/Basic Design I or AT 212/Basic 

Design II 
AT 231/History of Art I 
AT 232/History of Art II 
AT 213/Color 
AT 201/Painting I 
AT 304/Sculphire I or AT 305/ScuIpture II 



Art Certificates 



Coordinator: Elizabeth Moffitt, M.A. 

The art department offers certificates in 
graphic design, interior design and 
photography. Students must complete 15 
credit hours of required courses to earn a 
certificate. Students may choose to take 
these courses for credit or non-credit. For 
those students who take the non-credit 



Arts and Sciences 97 



option, it is not necessary to apply for 
admission to the university. However, for 
students who are admitted, the credits 
earned may be applied toward the 
requirements for a degree program. 

Graphic Design Certificate 

This certificate is designed for individuals 
employed in advertising, printing, 
photography, public relations and 
marketing as well as architects and those 
interested in entering the field of graphic 
design. Designed to broaden and update 
commercial art skills, the certificate courses 
emphasize layout, design and the principles 
of effective design communications. All 
students are required to take 18 credit hours, 
chosen from the seven courses listed below. 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 122/Graphic Design Production 

AT 203/Graphic Design I 

AT 204/Graphic Design II 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 221 /Typography I 

AT 222/Typography II 

Interior Design Certificate 

A program developed for individuals 
seeking a professional knowledge of design 
and decorating skills applicable to both 
home and office decoration. All students are 
required to take 15 credit hours, including 
five of the seven courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

AT 105/Basic Drawing I 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 212/Basic Design II 

AT 216/Architectural Drawing 

AT 233/History of Architecture and Interior 

Design 
AT 312/Color 
AT 317/Interior Design 
CE 302/Building Construction 



Photography Certificate 

A program in the basic design principles 
and techniques which govern photography. 
Designed for beginners, for people who 
want to apply photography to their present 
jobs, and for people who want to improve 
their present photography skills. 

This certificate also offers a foundation in 
photography for pleasure and leisure 
activities and for an aesthetic appreciation or 
photography as well. Students are required 
to take 15 credit hours, including the 
following courses: 

Required Courses 

AT 209/Photography I 

AT 210/Photography II 

AT 211/Basic Design I 

AT 225/Photographic Methods 

AT 309/Photographic Design 



Theatre Arts 

Theatre courses may be used to satisfy the 
arts core requirements. Refer to the latest 
class schedule bulletin to determine the 
specific courses permitted. 

Productions 

The university community may take part 
in all department productions. Volunteers 
may act, help with lighting, set and costume 
design, set construction, publicity and stage 
management. Participants need not be 
enrolled in theatre classes. 

Minor in Theatre Arts 

Students may complete a minor in theatre 
arts by taking 18 credit hours in the theatre 
program. Three major productions are 
mounted each year by the department with 
opportunities for students in performance, 
directing and backstage work. 

Required Courses 

T 131/Introduction to the Theatre 

T 132/Theatrical Style 

T 241 /Early World Drama and Theatre 

T 242/Modern World Drama and Theatre 



98 



Plus 6 additional credit hours in theatre arts, 
choose from: T 341 Acting, 
T 342 Directing, T 491 Production 
Practicum I, T492 Production Practicum II, 
T 599 Independent Study 



Music 



Coordinator: Michael G. Kaloyanides, Ph.D. 

Music courses may be used to satisfy the 
fine arts core requirements. 

B.A., Music 

The program in music is unique. Music is 
studied as a world-wide phenomenon, not 
simply defined in the Western European art 
tradition. The student is encouraged to view 
music as a creation of all cultures and 
civilizations on both the folk and art levels, 
including our own urban and ethnic 
subcultures. Exposure to various music 
should lead the student to specialization in 
a particular area as an upperclassman. 

Since music is a performing art, the 
student is expected to reach a satisfactory 
level of proficiency in either a traditional 
western instrument or one central to the 
particular culture in which he chooses to 
specialize. 

A degree in music qualifies students for 
professions as performers, composers, 
music publishers, critics and journalists, 
teachers, curators and librarians. Combining 
music with other fields, graduates may enter 
the fields of concert and ensemble 
management and sound engineering areas. 
There are, of course, countless performance 
opportunities for instrumentalists, vocalists 
and composers. Vocations such as music 
publishing, recording sales and promotions, 
and music criticism and journalism are also 
available to graduates with a degree in 
music. Students may also pursue careers in 
music education, not only as teachers in 
schools and conservatories but also as 
curators and librarians. 

All students majoring in the B. A. in music 
program must complete 121 credit hours. 



Although the program contains no 
language requirements, students are urged 
to acquaint themselves with the language of 
their area of concentration. 

Required Courses 

These courses must include the core 
requirements for the university and 36 credit 
hours of music including 21 credit hours 
from among the following courses listed 
below: 

MU Ill/Introduction to Music 

MU 112/Introduction to World Music 

MU 116/Performance (at least 3 credit hours 

must be earned) 
MU 150/Introduction to Music Theory 
MU 151 /Introduction to Music Theory 
MU 198/Introduction to American Music 
MU 199/Introduction to American Music 
MU 201/Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU 202/ Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU 250/Theory and Composition 
MU 251/Theory and Composition 

Plus 15 credit hours of upper-level courses 
(MU 299 and above) including MU 416 
Advanced Performance 

B.A., Music and Sound 
Recording 

The bachelor of arts in music and sound 
recording is a unique four-year degree 
program. Its development is based on the 
philosophy that musicians should have a 
working knowledge of the media through 
which their art is most often heard and that 
sound recordists should have a working 
knowledge of the art form they are 
recording. Thus, it is designed to instruct 
students in three interrelated areas: 1) music 
history, theory and aesthetics; 2) 
musicianship; and 3) sound recording 
methodology and technique. Course work 
includes 38 credits in arts and sciences, 36 
credits in music, 15 credits in recording and 
33 credits in restricted and free electives for 
a total of 122. 



Required Courses 

These courses must include university 
core requirements and the following courses 
listed below: 

MU Ill/Introduction to Music 

MU 112/Introduction to World Music 

MU 150/Music Theory I 

MU 151/Music Theory II 

MU 116/Performance (two semesters) 

MU 201/Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU 202/Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU 175/Musicianship I 
MU 176/Musicianship II 
MU211/History of Rock 
MU 221/Film Music 
MU 301/Recording Fundamentals 
MU 311/Multitrack Recording I 
MU 312/Multitrack Recording II 
MU 401/Recording Seminar/Project I 
MU 402/Recording Seminar/Project II 
PH 103/General Physics I 
PH 104/General Physics II 
PH 105/General Physics Laboratory I 
PH 106/General Physics Laboratory II 

B.S., Music and 
Sound Recording 

The bachelor of science in music and 
sound recording is similar to the bachelor of 
arts program in its philosophy and design 
but provides a stronger background in the 
science and technology of recording through 
classes in calculus, physics and electrical 
engineering. Course work includes 43 
credits in arts and sciences, 36 credits in 
music, 15 credits in recording, six credits in 
electrical engineering and 24 credits in 
restricted and free electives for a total of 124 
credits. 

Required Courses 

These courses must include university 
core requirements and the following courses 
listed below: 

MU Ill/Introduction to Music 
MU 112/Introduction to World Music 
MU 116/Performance (2 semesters) 
MU 150/Music Theory I 



Arts and Sciences 99 

MU 151/Music Theory II 

MU 175/Musicianship I 

MU 176/Musicianship II 

MU 201/Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU 202/Analysis and History of European 

Art Music 
MU211/History of Rock 
MU 221/Film Music 
MU 301/Recording Fundamentals 
MU 311/Multitrack Recording I 
MU 312/Multitrack Recording II 
MU 401/Recording Seminar/Project I 
MU 402/Recording Seminar/Project II 
M 117/CalculusI 
M 118/Calculus II 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat, Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 250/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
EE 211/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 
EE 212/Principles of Electrical Engineering II 

Minor in Music 

A total of 18 credit hours in music courses 
other than performance are required for the 
minor in music. A student's program should 
be planned in consultation with a member 
of the music faculty. 



Philosophy 



Coordinator: Joel H. Marks, Ph.D. 

Philosophy looks at fundamental 
assumptions about the nature of reality and 
human existence. Are people nothing but 
organic robots with computer brains? Or do 
we have eternal souls? Is it possible to love 
unselfishly? Is the world as it appears? Was 
there a Creation, or only a Big Bang? Does 
the mind exist separately from the brain? Is 
reason the slave of the passions? Do we live 
in the best of all possible universes? Is it 
better to be a human being dissatisfied than 
a pig satisfied? 

Philosophy courses at UNH examine 
Western thought from ancient times to the 
present, as well as the major traditions of the 



100 

Orient. The inquiry is at once speculative 
and disciplined. Logic is the method used 
throughout. 

Minor in Philosophy 

The minor in philosophy provides ample 
opportunity to consider many fascinating 
and important questions like the ones 
mentioned above. It is also very useful: 
Philosophy has helped people prepare for 
careers in such diverse fields as computer 
systems programming, engineering, 
management, insurance, marketing, 
publishing, real estate, technical writing, 
government, human services, journalism, 
law, medicine, teaching and research. 

The minor in philosophy consists of 18 
credits. The program is flexible; courses run 
frequently, day and evening, and can be 
taken in any order. Also, it is usually 
possible for students to cap their 
philosophical careers at U5sfH with 
independent study which lets them 
concentrate on a single topic of interest and 
set up their own schedule. For more details, 
contact the philosophy coordinator. 



I^CMJ/i 




SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS 



103 



Marilou McLaughlin, Ph.D., dean 
Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D., associate 
dean 

As the business world rapidly grows more 
complex, the need increases for a 
sophisticated and scientific approach to 
business, government and other 
organizational forms. The primary objective 
of the UNH business school is to prepare 
students for responsible and important jobs 
in management. A post-industrial society 
such as ours requires imaginative, analytical 
people. To meet this need, the School of 
Business provides a broad professional 
education preparing students to assume 
significant managerial positions. The 
curriculum emphasizes analytical tools 
needed to solve the intricate problems of 
today's organizations. 

Graduate programs in business are 
primarily professional degree programs in 
which the major objective is to develop 
practitioners of business and 
administration. Many men and women who 
are enrolled are at the same time employed 
in various public and private organizations 
and are working toward their degrees on a 
part-time basis. 

Programs and Concentrations 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting 

Financial Accounting 
Managerial Accounting 



Business Administration 
Human Resources Management 
Management Information Systems 
Management of Sports Industries 

Business Economics 
Communication 

Managerial and Organizational 
Communication 

Mass Communication 

Public Relations 

Criminal Justice 

Corrections 

Law Enforcement Administration 

Law Enforcement Science 

Security Management 
Finance 

Forensic Science 
International Business 
Marketing 
Public Administration 

Health Administration 

Associate in Science 

Business Administration 
Communication 
Criminal Justice 

Certificates 

Journalism 

Law Enforcement Science 
Mass Communication 
Security Management 



104 

Graduate Programs 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Business Administration for 

Executives (EMBA) 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of Science 
Accounting 
Criminal Justice 
Forensic Science 
Industrial Relations 
Taxation 

Doctor of Science in Management Systems 
Senior Professional Certificates 

Accounting and Taxation 

Economic Forecasting 

Finance 

General Management 

Human Resources Management 

International Business 

Marketing 

Public Management 

Quantitative Analysis 

General Policies in the School 
of Business 

• Each student will be assigned an academic 
adviser. 

• A student may select a business major after 
consultation with the adviser or the 
appropriate chairman. 

• A student may select a minor after 
consultation with the adviser or the 
appropriate chairman. 

• No coordinated course offering credit or 
transfer credit will be accepted for UNH 
juniors or seniors from two-year colleges. 
(See also "Coordinated Course" section.) 

• To receive a degree from the School of 
Business, the last 30 credits must be 
awarded by the University of New Haven. 

• A minimum of 121 semester hours is 
required for graduation. 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to business 
programs must be a graduate of an 
approved secondary school or the 
equivalent. While no set program of high 
school subjects is prescribed, an applicant 



must satisfy all of UNH's admissions 
criteria, including the standard of the 
university with respect to the high school 
average. Applicants must present 15 
acceptable units of satisfactory work, 
including nine or more units of college 
preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores on 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SAT) or American 
College Testing (ACT) program tests are 
required. See the Admission section in the 
beginning of this catalog. 

University Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
university core curriculum. See the Core 
Curriculum section of this catalog for the list 
of requirements. It should be noted that, 
whenever possible, liberal arts and lower 
division requirements should be completed 
by the end of the sophomore year. 

Common Courses for Business 
Programs 

Students earning bachelor degrees in 
School of Business programs must complete 
the basic business curriculum shown below, 
as well as the university core requirements 
and the course requirements for their chosen 
major. 

Required Courses 

A 101/Introduction to Financial Accounting* 
A 102/Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting* 
CO 100/Human Communication 
EC 100/Economic History of the U.S. 
EC 133/Principles of Economics I 
EC 134/Principles of Economics II 
FI 113/ Business Finance 
IB 31 2 /International Business 



* Accounting majors and students who wish to take 
advanced accounting courses must substitute Alll and 
A112, which are prerequisites for all advanced accounting 
courses. 



Business 105 



LA 101/Business Law (for non-accounting 

majors) 
MG 125/Management and Organization 
MK 105/Principles of Marketing 

Plus 6 credits of statistics and/or research 
methods courses, one advanced 
management course 

Department of 
Accounting 

Chairman: Robert McDonald, M.B.A. 

Professors: Satish Chandra, J.S.D., Yale 
University; William S. DeMayo, C.P.A., 
M.B.A., New York University; Ernest M. 
Dichele, C.P.A., LL.M., Boston 
University School of Law 

Associate Professors: Eleanor Fillebrown, 
C.P.A., M.B.A. , M.S., Drexel University; 
Robert McDonald, C.M.A., C.P.A., 
M.B.A., New York University; Richard 
Reimer, C.P.A., M.S., Columbia 
University; Robert E. Wnek, C.P.A., 
LL.M., Boston University School of Law 

Assistant Professors: Nancy Faria-Smith, 
C.P.A., M.B.A., University of Hartford; 
Michael J. RoUeri, C.P.A., M.B.A., 
University of Connecticut 

The accounting department is responsible 
for courses in accounting, business law and 
taxation. While the study of accounting has 
its roots in economic theory, the courses 
emphasize practical application to real world 
problems. 

The study of accounting emphasizes the 
economic decision-making process as well 
as the principles and procedures used to 
produce the information required by 
decision makers. Accounting promotes an 
appreciation for not only the nature of 
accounting information but also the use of 
that information in the complex process of 
decision making by individuals, business 
firms and government. The department of 
accounting at the University of New Haven 
seeks to serve the educational needs of those 
involved in all areas of accounting — public, 
private, or governmental. 



Students must select from a financial 
accounting or managerial accounting 
program of study. 

There are many career opportunities for 
students in the business world, government 
and academia. Accounting professionals are 
needed by consulting firms, public 
accounting firms and private industry, as 
well as by federal, state and local 
governments. Because of the practical 
orientation of the program, future business 
entrepreneurs can benefit by the 
background obtained in these programs. 

The accounting department at the 
University of New Haven offers courses at 
the bachelor and master's level for the study 
of accounting. 

Accounting students may select electives 
from other disciplines such as computer 
science, economics and finance. 

On the graduate level, the department 
offers programs leading to a master of 
science in accounting and in taxation. A 
concentration in accounting is also available 
to students enrolled in the master of 
business administration program. 

Complete information about these 
graduate programs is available in the 
Graduate School catalog. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 



B.S. Accounting 

Students in the accounting major may 
select from concentrations in financial or 
managerial accounting. 

The financial accounting concentration is 
selected by those students wishing to 
pursue a career in public accounting leading 
to the certified public accountant (C.P.A.) 
license. The integration of business law, 
taxation and finance into the program 
provides the student with the necessary 



106 

academic background to meet the challenges 
of the accounting profession. 

The managerial accounting concentration 
is selected by students wishing to pursue a 
career in private accounting as management 
accountants including the possible attain- 
ment of the certificate of management 
accounting (CM. A.)- The program provides 
for courses at the advanced levels in finance 
and economics, in order to prepare the 
student for the kinds of decisions likely to be 
made within the organizational structure. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in accounting are 
required to complete 121 credits including 
the university core curriculum, common 
courses for business majors and the courses 
listed below. 

A 220/Intermediate Accounting I 

A 221 /Intermediate Accounting II 

A 222/Intermediate Accounting III 

A 223/Cost Accounting I 

A 224/Cost Accounting II 

A 331/Advanced Financial Accounting I 

A 333/ Auditing Principles 

A 335/Federal Income Taxation I 

A 336/Federal Income Taxation II 

LA Ill/Accounting Business Law I 

LA 11 2/ Accounting Business Law II 

Accounting majors take A 111 and A 112 
instead of A 101 and A 102 in the common 
courses for business programs. A 111 and 
A 112 are prerequisites for advanced 
accounting courses. 

Concentration in Financial 
Accounting 

Students earning the B.S. in accounting 
with a concentration in financial accounting 
must complete 121 credit hours, including 
the university core curriculum, common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for accounting majors listed above, 
and the following: 

A 334/Auditing Procedures 

A 337/Federal Income Taxation III 



Concentration in Managerial 
Accounting 

Students earning a B.S. in accounting with 
a concentration in managerial accounting 
must complete 121 credit hours, including 
the university core curriculum, common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for accounting majors listed above, 
and the following: 

A 225/Advanced Managerial Accounting 
FI 229/Corporate Financial Management 
QA 333/ Advanced Statistics 

Minor in Accounting 

Requirements for the accounting minor 
include a total of 18 semester hours. 
Students must complete the following 
courses: 

A Ill/Introduction to Accounting I 

A 112/Introduction to Accounting II 

A 220/Intermediate Financial Accounting I 

A 221/Intermediate Financial Accounting II 

Plus two additional accounting courses with 
consent of the undergraduate accounting 
coordinator. 



Department of 
Communication 

Chairman: Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D. 

Professors: M.L. McLaughlin, Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin; Steven A. 

Raucher, Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Associate Professor: Jean-Richard Bodon, 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
Assistant Professor: Donald C. Smith, 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

(Amherst) 
Instructor: Bruce Avery, M.A., Emerson 

College 

Communication majors encounter a 
multifaceted exploration of the human 
communication process. The major allows 
for a blend of theory and practice in courses 
which emphasize professional standards 



Business 107 



and applications. Students learn concepts 
and skills which enable them to better 
understand and become active participants 
in the business/media world, and can 
prepare for graduate studies as well. This 
program of study involves both academic 
rigor and practical experience. 

The department has internship contacts 
with a number of organizations in the 
greater New Haven area and works closely 
with the local media. Communication 
majors are involved in the student 
newspaper, radio station and the 
programming of local television. 

Institutional memberships which the 
department enjoys include the Connecticut 
Broadcasters' Association, the International 
Association of Business Communicators, the 
Audit Bureau of Circulation and the Speech 
Communication Association. Faculty 
members and some students belong to such 
professional organizations as the 
International Communication Association, 
the Public Relations Society of America, the 
Eastern Communication Association, the 
National Forensics Association, the National 
Academy of TV Arts and Sciences, the 
National Academy of Cable Programming, 
the National Federation of Local Cable 
Programming, the American Film Institute 
and the Broadcast Educators Association. 

In the interest of student advancement 
and the development of professional 
contacts, the department sponsors and 
advises several student organizations 
including the Communication Club and the 
Public Relations Student Society of America. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 



B.S., Communication 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in communi- 
cation must complete 121 credit hours, 
including university core requirements and 
all common courses for business majors. 
Communication majors will take: 

CO 101/Fundamentals of Mass 

Communication 
J 101/Journalism I 
CO 109/Communication for Management 

and Business 
CO 114/Elements of Production 
CO 200/Theories of Group Communication 
CO 205/Intercultural Communication 
CO 208/Introduction to Broadcasting 
CO 300/Persuasive Communication 
CO 302/Social Impact of Media 
CO 500/Seminar in Communication Studies 
and choose from one of three concentration areas: 

Managerial and Organizational 
Communication 

Public Relations 

Mass Communication 

These concentrations are designed for 
students with a wide range of interests. 
Whether students envision becoming 
communication consultants, television 
camera operators, broadcasters, journalists, 
producers of documentary films, business 
managers, lawyers, politicians, informed 
citizens, or researchers investigating the 
effects of communication on society and 
why people say what they say, it is the 
department's objective to assist students in 
the pursuit of these goals and to provide 
them with a sound academic background. 

Concentration in Managerial 
and Organizational 
Communication 

Students earning the B.S. in 
communication with a concentration in 
managerial and organizational 
communication must complete the 
university core curriculum, the common 
courses for business majors, the common 



108 

courses for communication majors listed 
above, and the following: 

CO 399/Media Campaigns 
CO 400/Communication in Organizations 
CO 408/Public Relations Systems 
CO 410/Management Communication 
Seminar 

Concentration in Mass 
Communication 

Students earning the B.S. in 
communication with a concentration in 
mass communication must complete the 
university core curriculum, the common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for communication majors listed 
above, and the following: 

CO 212/TV Production I 

CO 214/Elements of Film 

CO 103/Audio in Media or CO 3 12/Tele vision 

Production II 
CO 220/Film Production I or CO 203/Radio 

Production 
(Note: CO 103 is a prerequisite for CO 203.) 

Concentration in Public 
Relations 

Students earning the B.S. in 
communication with a concentration in 
public relations must complete the 
university core curriculum, the common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for communication majors listed 
above, and the following: 

J 311/Copy Desk 
CO 309/Public Relations Writing 
CO 408/Public Relations Systems 
MK 307/ Advertising and Promotion 

B.A., Communication 

For more information on the B.A. in 
communication, see the School of Arts and 
Sciences section of this catalog. 



A.S., Communication 

Upon successful completion of the first 
two years of the four-year bachelor of 
science program in communication, 
students may petition to receive an associate 
in science degree with a major in 
communication. Students should consult 
with an adviser for specific information. 

Minor in Communication 

A total of 18 semester hours of 
communication course credits must be 
earned in order for a student to declare the 
area of study as a completed minor. This 
work must include CO 100 Human 
Communication. The balance of the minor 
program is worked out in individual 
conference with the student and his or her 
communication department adviser. 



Communication 
Certificates 

Coordinator: Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D. 

The communication department offers 
certificates in journalism and mass 
communication. Students must complete 15 
credit hours to earn a certificate. Students 
may choose to take these courses for credit 
or non-credit. For those students who take 
the non-credit option, it is not necessary to 
apply for admission to the university. 
However, if you are admitted, the credits 
earned may be applied toward the 
requirements for a degree program. 

Mass Communication 
Certificate 

This program offers options in television 
production, radio production, writing for 
media, interpersonal communication or a 
combination of radio/television and film. All 
students are required to take 15 credit hours, 
including the courses hsted: 



Required Courses 

CO 100/Human Communication 
CO 101/Fundamentals of Mass 

Communication 
CO 302/Social Impact of Media 

Plus two other courses taken in consultation 
with an adviser. 

Journalism Certificate 

For more information on journalism 
certificate requirements, please refer to the 
School of Arts and Sciences section under 
the communication programs. 



Graduate Studies 

The communication department offers 
several graduate concentrations. Please 
consult the Graduate School catalog for 
more information. 



Department of 
Economics/Finance 

Chairman: Joseph Parker, Ph.D. 

Professors: Peter I. Berman, Ph.D., The 
Johns Hopkins University; Phillip Kaplan, 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; 
Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma; Alan Plotnick, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania; Robert M. 
Rainish, Ph.D., City University of New 
York; Franklin B. Sherwood, Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Rolf Tedefalk, 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; John J. 
Teluk, M.A., Free University of Munich 

Associate Professors: Gilbert McNeill, 
Ph.D., University of Geneva; Ward 
Theilman, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professors: Edward A. Downe, 
Ph.D., New School for Social Research; 
Steven J. Shapiro, Ph.D., Georgetown 
University; Mary Martha Woodruff, 
M.A., Murray State University, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

Economics courses provide a basis for an 
understanding of economic structures, a 



Business 109 

wide range of domestic and international 
issues and trends in the economic life of 
modern societies. These courses offer 
training in analysis of economic problems as 
an aid to the evaluation of economic policies. 

Introductory courses are designed to 
provide the foundation of economic 
knowledge which every citizen in a modern 
complex society should have so they may 
understand the decisions of individual 
economic units and the operation of a 
national economy as a whole. 

Advanced courses are designed primarily 
for economics and business majors. They 
cover in depth specific economic topics. 
They also prepare students for economic 
research and management positions in 
financial institutions, individual 
organizations, government or graduate 
study and teaching. 

The department of economics has two 
major objectives: to function as a service 
department for other departments in the 
School of Business and other schools of the 
university and to offer a specialized 
education to students majoring in 
economics. 

Students majoring in economics may 
choose either a bachelor of science in 
business economics or a bachelor of arts in 
economics. 

Finance, as an area of study, is designed 
to promote an analytical appreciation of the 
financial system and the financial decision- 
making process in which society, through its 
individuals, business firms and govern- 
ments, is continually engaged. 

In particular, the study of finance 
provides a structured analysis of the 
financial system and the financial decision- 
making process as determinants of the 
economic wealth of the individual, the 
business firm and the nation. The study of 
finance enables the student to pursue the 
preparation required for a number of 
financial decision-making positions in 
government and industry, including the 
entire variety of financial institutions. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 



110 



which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 

B.S., Business Economics 

The program in business economics is 
designed to prepare students for research or 
executive positions in business or 
government. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in business 
economics must complete 121 credit hours 
including the university core curriculum, 
the common courses for business majors 
and those courses listed below: 

EC 311/Government Regulation of Business 
EC 312/Contemporary Economic Problems 
EC 336/Money and Banking 
EC 341/Macroeconomic Analysis 
EC 420/Applied Economic Analysis 
EC 442/Economic Thought 

Plus two of the following: 

EC 250/Economics and U.S. Industrial 

Competitiveness 
EC 314/Public Finance and Budgeting 
EC 340/Microeconomic Analysis 
EC 342/International Economics 
EC 350/Economics and Labor Relations 

B.A., Economics 

For information about the B.A. program 
in economics, see the School of Arts and 
Sciences section of this catalog. 

B.S., Finance 

Required Courses* 

Students earning a B.S. in finance must 
complete 121 credit hours including the 
university core curriculum, common 
courses for business majors, and the 
following: 

FI 229 /Corporate Financial Management 
FI 230 /Investment Analysis and 

Management 
FI 341 /Financial Decision Making 



FT 345 /Financial Institutions and Markets 
A 220 /Intermediate Financial Accounting I 
A 221 /Intermediate Financial Accounting II 
A 350 /Accounting Information Systems 
EC 340/Microeconomic Analysis 
EC 341 /Macroeconomic Analysis 
QA 21 6 /Probability and Statistics 
QA 250 /Quantitative Techniques II 
QA 333/Advanced Statistics 

*Finatice majors should take A 111 and A 112 instead of 
A 101 and A 102. 

A student majoring in finance may add a 
minor in economics, accounting or 
quantitative analysis to the above. 

Minor in Economics 

Eighteen credit hours of economics 
courses are required for a minor including 
those listed below: 

Recommended Courses 

EC 133/Principles of Economics I 
EC 134/Principles of Economics II 
EC 341/Macroeconomic Analysis 
EC 420/Applied Economic Analysis 

Plus 6 credits of economics electives to be 

chosen from: 
EC 312/Contemporary Economic Problems 
EC 314/Public Finance and Budgeting 
EC 340/Microeconomics 
EC 442/Economic Thought 
EC 350/Economics of Labor Relations 

Minor in Finance 

Requirements for the finance minor 
include a total of 18 semester hours. 
Students must complete the following four 
courses: 

FI 113/Business Finance 

FI 229 /Corporate Financial Management 

FI 230 /Investment Analysis and 

Management 
FI 345 /Financial Institutions and Markets 

Plus, after conferring with faculty, the 
student must select two of the following 
courses: 

FI 325 /International Finance 
FI 341 /Financial Decision Making 
EC 336/Money and Banking 
EC 341/Macroeconomic Analysis 



Department of 
Management 

Chairman: Abbas Nadim, Ph.D. 

Professors: Robert W. Baeder, Ph.D., Ohio 
State University; Lynn Ellis, D.P.S., Pace 
University; Wilfred R. Harricharan, 
Ph.D., Cornell University; William S.Y. 
Pan, Ph.D., Columbia University; Warren 
Smith, M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Associate Professors: Vijay Ashar, Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University; William 
Bockley, Ph.D., Boston College; Pawel 
Mensz, Ph.D., Polish Academy of 
Sciences; Abbas Nadim, Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania-The Wharton School; 
Judith Neal, Ph.D., Yale University; Edyth 
Tedefalk, Ph.D., University of North 
Dakota 

Assistant Professor: Frank T. Flaumenhaft, 
M.B.A., New York University 

At this time in history when all of society's 
systems — governmental, technological, 
societal, educational, industrial and military 
as well as business — are becoming more 
sophisticated and complex, the need for 
skilled managers has never been greater. As 
automation frees people from having to deal 
directly with materials and the computer 
lessens the burden of processing data, 
today's managers are able to direct their 
energies to planning, organizing, directing 
and controlling — the four major functions of 
management. 

The management programs at UNH seek 
to provide students with the foundations of 
knowledge and skill necessary for moving to 
positions of responsibility in management. 
The theories and methods of analyzing 
decisions studied prepare students for 
entry-level jobs, as well as sharpen the skills 
of those already holding organizational 
positions. The underlying concept is to 
combine adequate specialization with the 
integrative point of view required of the 
manager. 

The department of management offers 
degree programs in the following areas: 
associate of science degree program in 
business administration and bachelor of 



Business 111 

science degree programs in business 
administration with concentrations available 
in human resources management, 
management information systems and 
management of sports industries. 

Management Club 

The department of management sponsors 
a student chapter of the Society for the 
Advancement of Management (SAM) which 
is open to students interested in the art and 
science of professional management. This 
organization provides students and faculty 
with a professional and social experience 
that cannot be found in the classroom. 
Speakers, films, discussion groups and 
other activities are scheduled and open to all 
those interested in attending. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 

B.S., Business Administration 

In order to function effectively in a variety 
of management situations, administrators 
should be conversant with all major areas of 
management. Moreover, they should have a 
thorough understanding of the 
interrelationships which exist among the 
different functional groups within 
organizations. This point of view is essential 
for managers who are to participate 
effectively with others in the administrative 
group and who are to administer activities 
in their areas of responsibility in the best 
interest of the entire organization. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in business 
administration must complete 121 credit 
hours including the university core 
curriculum, the common courses for 
business majors and the courses listed 
below: 

MG 231/Management of Human Resources 
MG 350/ Advanced Management 



112 



MG 455/Managerial Effectiveness 

MG 512/Contemporary Issues in Business 

and Society 
MG 515/Management Seminar 
MG 550/Business Policy 
MK 413/International Marketing 

Management 

Three concentrations designed to meet 
individual student interests and needs are 
available within the B.S. business 
administration program: human resources 
management; management information 
systems and management of sports 
industries. 

Concentration in Human 
Resources Management 

The major responsibility for human 
resources management is to attract, develop 
and retain qualified personnel for the 
organization. The major applies the research 
of the behavioral and social sciences in 
manpower planning, personnel selection, 
compensation, planning adjustment to 
change and the development of 
organizational performance. Labor relations 
examines the organization of workers and 
union-management relations. 

Students in this concentration study 
established and developing systems for the 
resolution of conflict and the building of 
viable, accommodative relationships 
between employers and employees. 
Emphasis is placed upon the interaction of 
labor, management and the government in 
establishing rates, hours and conditions of 
work. The approach is keyed to an 
institutional analysis of collective manpower 
problems and issues within an economic 
and organizational framework. 

Students earning the B.S. in business 
administration with a concentration in 
human resources management must 
complete the university core curriculum, the 
common courses for business majors, the 
common courses for business adminis- 
tration majors listed previously, and the 
following: 

CO 410/Management Communication 

Seminar 
MG 232/Labor Relations 



MG 332/Management of Compensation 
MG 520/Current Issues in Human Resource 
Management 

Concentration in Management 
Information Systems \ 

Management's use of quantitative 
methods has been increasingly reinforced by 
the application of high speed computer 
technology and techniques in organizations. 
The advances in simulation, mathematic 
programming, decision theory and 
computer control systems have generated a 
need for personnel well trained in both the 
management sciences and the computer and 
information sciences. 

Students earning the B.S. in business 
administration with a concentration in 
management information systems must 
complete the university core curriculum, the 
common courses for business majors, the 
common courses for business administration 
majors listed above, and the following: 

MS 300/Microcomputers and Networking 

within Organizations 
MS 400/Systems Analysis and Design within 

Organizations 
MS 460/Information Systems within 

Organizations 
MS 480/Seminar in Information 

Management Systems 

Concentration in Management 
of Sports Industries 

Management of Sports Industries is a 
course of study for the student looking for a 
growing high-tech career in an exciting, fast- 
paced, people-oriented field. It is offered by 
the University of New Haven School of 
Business as a concentration in the business 
administration program. 

Sports industries are expanding and have 
a growing need for individuals who are 
trained in specialized business 
administration and management skills and 
who understand the unique aspects of 
sports industries. Sports organizations from 
professional clubs to sports arenas and 
college athletic facilities all require 
management by trained professionals. 



A.S., Business Administration 

Students earning the A.S. in business 
administration must complete 61 credit 
hours including those courses listed below: 

MG 125/Management and Organization 

MG 231/Management of Human Resources 

A 101/Introduction to Accounting 

LA 101/Business Law 

MS 200/Business Systems Analysis 

QA 118/Business Math 

EC 100/Economic History of U.S. 

EC 134/Principles of Economics I 

MK 105/Principles of Marketing 

QA 128/Quantitative Technology 

A 102/Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 
FI 113/Business Finance 

Minor in Business 
Administration (for Non- 
Business Majors) 

A total of 18 semester hours of business 
course credits must be earned in order for a 
student to declare the field as a completed 
minor area of study. The minor in business 
administration is open to non-business 
majors. The courses required for a minor in 
business administration are: 

A 101/Introduction to Financial Accounting 

MK 105/Principles of Marketing 

MG 125/Management and Organization 

MG 231 /Management of Human Resources 

MG 350/Advanced Management 

MG 455 /Managerial Effectiveness 

Minor in Management (for 
Business Majors) 

A total of 18 semester hours of business 
course credits must be earned in order for a 
student to declare the field as a completed 
minor area of study. The courses required 
for a minor in management are listed below: 

MG 231/Management of Human Resources 
MG 232/Labor Management Relations 
MG 350/Advanced Management 
MG 455/Managerial Effectiveness 
MG 512/Contemporary Issues in Business 
and Society 



Business 113 

Department of 
Marketing and 
International 
Business 

Chairman: Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D. 

Professors: Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D., New 
York University; Steven A. Raucher, 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Associate Professor: Robert P. Brody, 
D.B.A., Harvard University 

Assistant Professors: Michael Kublin, 
Ph.D., New York University; David 
Morris, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

The study of marketing comprises both 
managerial and societal perspectives. 
Emphasis is placed heavily on the 
coordination of product, promotion, price 
and distribution policies optimally designed 
to relate the firm to its competitive 
environment. Societal dimensions include 
issues in consumer protection, legal and 
social responsibilities of the firm, and 
analyses of marketing's contribution to the 
total society. 

International business is an 
interdisciplinary program which draws on 
areas of marketing, management, finance 
and economics in order to develop a 
multinational perspective on contemporary 
business opportunities throughout the 
world. It deals with the problems of 
developing and adapting business practices 
to operate within different economic, 
political and cultural systems. 

Marketing Clubs 

The department of marketing and 
international business sponsors a student 
chapter of the American Marketing 
Association (AMA), which is open to 
students interested in the art and science of 
marketing. The student chapter provides 
students and faculty with a professional and 
social experience that cannot be found in the 
classroom. Speakers, films, discussion 
groups and other activities are scheduled 
and open to all those interested in attending. 



114 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 

B.S., Marketing 

Marketing focuses on activities 
instrumental to the efficient flow of goods 
and services from producers to consumers. 
Marketing concepts are widely applied to 
government agencies, political campaigns, 
hospitals and various other social 
organizations, as well as business and 
industry. 

The study of marketing includes both 
managerial and societal perspectives. 
Managerial emphasis is placed heavily on 
the coordination of product, promotion, 
price and distribution policies optimally 
designed to relate the firm to its competitive 
environment. Societal dimensions include 
issues in consumer protection, legal and 
social responsibilities of the firm, and 
analysis of marketing's contribution to the 
total society. 

Individual coursework is primarily 
designed to prepare majors for either a 
career in business or administration. 
Students may specialize in such areas as 
advertising, sales, logistics, marketing 
research, buyer behavior or marketing 
management. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in marketing must 
complete 121 credit hours. These courses 
must include the university core curriculum, 
common courses for business majors and 
the courses listed below: 

MK 205/Consumer Behavior 
MK 302/Industrial Marketing 
MK 307/ Advertising and Promotion 
MK 413/International Marketing 

Management 
MK 442/Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 



MK 470/Business Logistics 
MK 515/Marketing Management 
MG 512/Contemporary Issues in Business 
and Society 

Plus other courses to be selected with an 
adviser 

B.S., International Business 

International business is an 
interdisciplinary program which draws on 
areas of marketing, management, finance 
and economics in order to develop a 
multinational perspective on contemporary 
business opportunities throughout the 
world. It deals with the problems of 
developing and adapting business practices 
to operate within different economies, 
different political systems and different 
cultures. 

A background in international business 
prepares the student for careers in both the 
private and public sectors, as well as in 
international non-profit institutions. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in international 
business must complete 121 credit hours. 
These courses must include the university 
core curriculum, common courses for 
business majors and the courses listed 
below: 

FI 325/International Finance 

IB 421/Operation of Multinational 

Corporations 
IB 549/International Business Policy 
MG 350/ Advanced Management 
MG 415/Comparative Management 
MK 413/International Marketing 

Management 

Plus two of the following: 
PS 241 International Relations 
EC 342/International Economics 
EC 440/Economic Development 
CO 205/Intercultural Communication 

Minor in Marketing 

A total of 18 semester hours of business 
course credits must be earned in order for a 
student to declare the field as a completed 



minor area of study. The courses required 
for a minor in marketing are: 

MK 105/Principles of Marketing 
MK 205/Consumer Behavior 
MK 307/Advertising and Promotion 
MK 442/Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 515/Marketing Management 

Plus a course in international business, with 
the approval of the coordinator. 

Minor in International 
Business 

A total of 18 semester hours of business 
course credits must be earned in order for a 
student to declare the field as a completed 
minor area of study. The courses required 
for a minor in international business are: 

IB 312/International Business 

IB 421/Operahon of Multinational 

Corporations 
IB 549/International Business Policy 
MK 413/International Marketing 

Management 

Plus two of the following: 

EC 342/International Economics 

EC 440/Economic Development 

PS 241/International Relations 

CO 205/Intercultural Communication 

Department of Public 
Management 

Chairman: Charles N. Coleman, M.P.A. 

Criminal Justice 

Security Management: David A. Maxwell, 

J.D., C.P.P., coordinator 
Forensic Science: R.E. Gaensslen, Ph.D., 

director; Henry C. Lee, Ph.D., 

practitioner-in-residence, chief criminalist 

and director, Connecticut State Police 

Forensic Science Laboratory 

Professors: R.E. Gaensslen, Ph.D., Cornell 
University; David A. Maxwell, J.D., 
University of Miami; L. Craig Parker, 



Business 115 

Ph.D., State University of New York at 
Buffalo; Gerald D. Robin, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 
Practitioners-in-Residence: Lloyd S. 
Goodrow, J . D. , University of Connecticut; 
Henry C. Lee, Ph.D., New York 
University 

Public Administration 

Professor: jack Werblow, Ph.D., University 

of Cincinnati. 
Assistant Professor: Charles N. Coleman, 

M.P.A., West Virginia University 



Criminal Justice 

The criminal justice system is a formal 
mechanism of control through which social 
order is maintained. The study of this 
system is approached in an interdisciplinary 
manner involving law, the physical sciences 
and the social sciences. Through the use of 
both conventional and innovative 
techniques, including lectures, written 
assignments, seminars, workshops, 
internships and independent research and 
study, an attempt is made to provide 
students with the opportunity to gain a wide 
variety of insights and experiences. 

There is a full range of career 
opportunities available in criminal justice at 
the local, state and national levels. Because 
of its interdisciplinary approach, the study 
of criminal justice fills the needs of students 
seeking careers in teaching, research and 
law, and of the inservice personnel seeking 
academic and professional advancement. 

The department offers courses from the 
associate to the master's level as well as 
certificates. Complete information about the 
master of science degree is available in the 
Graduate School catalog. 

Undergraduate study of criminal justice 
concentrates on five principal areas of study. 
Four concentrations — in law enforcement 
administration, corrections, law 
enforcement science and security 
management — are available in the criminal 
justice program. A separate program is 
offered in forensic science. 



116 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 

B.S., Criminal Justice 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal 
justice are required to complete at least 121 
credit hours including the university core 
curriculum, specified courses from the 
common courses for business majors and 
the common courses for criminal justice 
majors listed below: 

CJ 100/Introduction to Criminal Justice I 

CJ 101 /Introduction to Criminal Justice II 

CJ 102/Criminal Law 

CJ 201/Principles of Criminal Investigation 

CJ 205/Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 215/Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJ 217/Criminal Procedures and Evidence I 

CJ 218/Criminal Procedures and Evidence II 

CJ 311/Criminology 

CJ 498/Research Project or 

CJ 501/Criminal Justice Internship 



Concentration in Corrections 

This concentration is designed to prepare 
students for careers with federal, state, local 
and private correctional agencies and 
institutions. It is concerned with the 
treatment of offenders, administration, 
planning and research. The curriculum 
emphasizes law, social and behavioral 
sciences and research methodology. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal 
justice with a concentration in corrections 
must complete the university core 
curriculum, a specified selection of courses 
from the common courses for business 
majors, the common courses for criminal 
justice majors listed above, and the 
following: 



CJ 209/Corrective Treatment Programs 

CJ 220/Legal Issues in Correction 

CJ 301/Group Dynamics in Criminal Justice 

CJ 408/Correctional Counseling I 

CJ 409/Correctional Counseling II 

Concentration in Law 
Enforcement Administration 

This concentration prepares students for 
careers in federal, state and local law 
enforcement agencies, public and private 
security forces, planning agencies and other 
related settings. The curriculum focuses on 
the roles, activities and behaviors of people 
with regard to maintaining law and order, 
providing needed services, protecting life 
and property and planning and research. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal 
justice with a concentration in law 
enforcement administration must complete 
the university core curriculum, a specified 
selection of courses from the common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for criminal justice majors listed 
above, and the following: 

CJ 221/Juvenile Justice System 

CJ 301/Group Dynamics in Criminal Justice 

CJ 333/Police Civil Liability 

CJ 400/Criminal Justice Problems Seminar 

CJ 402/Police in Society 

Concentration in Law 
Enforcement Science 

This concentration is designed to provide 
an interdisciplinary educational program for 
those people entering law enforcement 
science fields, especially investigative work. 
In addition, it is geared toward enhancing 
the scientific knowledge of those people 
now holding investigative positions in 
various enforcement agencies. The 
curriculum emphasizes law enforcement, 
forensic science, natural and physical 
science and the behavioral sciences. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal 
justice with a concentration in law 
enforcement science must complete the 
university core curriculum, a specified 
selection from the common courses for 



Business 117 



business majors, the common courses for 
criminal justice majors listed above and the 
following: 

CJ 204/Forensic Photography with 

Laboratory 
CJ 227/Fingerprints with Laboratory 
CJ 303/Forensic Science Laboratory I 
CJ 304/Forensic Science Laboratory II 
CJ 415/Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 

It is recommended that students in this 
concentration take CJ 416 Forensic Science 
Seminar. 

Concentration in Security 
Management 

This concentration in security 
management is designed to provide those 
entering or now holding administrative or 
managerial positions in private security the 
necessary skills and know-how to perform 
effectively and professionally. The program 
is interdisciplinary in nature and draws from 
the areas of criminal justice, forensic science, 
business administration, industrial 
engineering and the behavioral sciences. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal 
justice with a concentration in security 
management must complete the university 
core curriculum, a specified selection of 
courses from the common courses for 
business majors, the common courses for 
criminal justice majors listed above, and the 
following: 

CJ 105/Introduction to Security 

CJ 203/Security Administration 

CJ 226/Industrial Security 

CJ 306/Security Problems Seminar 

CJ 410/Legal Issues in Private Security 

B.S., Forensic Science 

Forensic science is a broad, inter- 
disciplinary field in which biological and 
physical science methods are used to 
analyze and evaluate physical evidence 
related to matters of criminal and civil law. 
The objective of the program is to provide 
an appropriate education and scientific 
background to men and women planning 



careers as physical evidence exammers in 
crime laboratories. The curriculum is also 
appropriate for individuals currently 
working in forensic science laboratories and 
would be valuable for those interested in 
related areas whose professional work 
requires in-depth knowledge of science and 
scientific investigation methods. The 
curriculum provides sufficient flexibility to 
allow students to focus their studies in 
chemistry or in biology. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in forensic 
science must complete 136 credit hours, 
including the university core curriculum and 
the following courses: 
P Ill/Introduction to Psychology or SO 113/ 

Sociology 
CO 100/Human Communication 
CJ 100/Introduction to Criminal Justice I 
CJ 102/Criminal Law 
CJ 201/Principles of Investigation 
CJ 215/Introduction to Forensic Science 
CJ 303/Forensic Science Laboratory I 
CJ 304/Forensic Science Laboratory II 
CJ 415/Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 
CJ 416/Seminar in Forensic Science 
CJ 501/Internship or CJ 498/Research Project 
BI 121/General Biology I with Laboratory 
BI 122/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory 
BI 304/Immunology with Laboratory or 

M 203/Calculus III 
BI 311/Genetics with Laboratory or CH 331/ 

Physical Chemistry I with Laboratory 
BI 461/Biochemistry I with Laboratory or CH 

332/Physical Chemistry II with Laboratory 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 116/General Chemistry 11 
CH 117/General Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 118/General Chemistry II Laboratory 
CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 
CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 
CH 203/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 204/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 
CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
CH 351/Qualitative Organic Analysis with 

Laboratory 



118 

CS 102/Introduction to Programming/ 

FORTRAN or CS 107/Introduction to Data 

Processing 
One of the following sequences: 
M 115/Pre-calculus Mathematics and M 117/ 

Calculus I; or 
M117/Calculus I and M 118/Calculus II 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Electives are chosen through discussion 
with adviser 

A.S., Criminal Justice 

Students completing the first two years of 
the bachelor of science degree program in 
criminal justice with the law enforcement 
administration concentration (61 credit 
hours) are eligible to receive the associate in 
science degree. Interested students should 
contact their adviser. 

Minor in Criminal Justice 

To minor in criminal justice, students 
must complete 18 credit hours of criminal 
justice courses, including those listed below: 

CJ 100/Introduction to Criminal Justice I 
CJ 101/Introduction to Criminal Justice II 



Criminal Justice 
Certificates 



Coordinator: David A. Maxwell, J.D., C.P.P. 

The department offers certificates in law 
enforcement science and security 
management. Students must complete 18 
credit hours of required courses to earn a 
certificate. Students may choose to take 
these courses for credit or non-credit. For 
those students who take the non-credit 
option, it is not necessary to apply for 
admission to the university. However, if you 
are admitted, the credits earned may be 
applied toward the requirements for a 
degree program. 



Law Enforcement Science 
Certificate 

This certificate is designed to provide the 
fundamentals of criminal investigation 
techniques and procedures, particularly for 
those involved in or planning to enter 
investigative positions in law enforcement 
agencies in both the private and public 
sectors. All students are required to take 18 
credit hours, including the courses listed 
below: 

Required Courses 

CJ 201/Principles of Criminal Investigation 
CJ 215/Introduction to Forensic Science 
CJ 227/Fingerprints with Laboratory 
CJ 303-304/Forensic Science Laboratory I 

and II 
CJ 415/Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 

Security Management 
Certificate 

This certificate is a concentrated program 
of study in management security systems for 
private business and industry. All students 
are required to take 18 credit hours, 
including the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CJ 105/Introduction to Security 
CJ 203/Security Administration 
CJ 226/Industrial Security 
CJ 410/Legal Issues in Private Security 
FS 402/Arson Investigation I 
SH 100/Safety Organization and 
Management 



Public 
Administration 

The public administration program is 
designed to prepare students for public 
service responsibility as government 
program administrators, civic leaders and 
managers or private businesses deeply 
involved in governmental affairs. Stressed 
are the organization of government services, 
the behavior of public officials, the manner 



in which government raises revenue, the 
nature of public personnel systems, the role 
of collective bargaining in the public sector, 
the manner in which decisions on public 
expenditures are made and public 
administrative procedures. 

An understanding of public 
administration is also essential for people 
preparing for careers in law, journalism and 
every aspect of business. Public 
administration training can be easily 
combined with specialized career programs 
at the University of New Haven. 

Public administration students are 
strongly encouraged to systematically 
develop their public speaking, group 
discussion and writing skills through 
specialized instruction and as a part of their 
regular public administration course 
requirements. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
Office. 



B.S., Public Administration 

All students earning the B.S. in public 
administration must complete 121 credit 
hours including the university core 
curriculum and the common courses for 
public administration majors listed below. 

Required Courses 

PA 101/Introduction to Public 

Administration 
PA 302/Public Administration Systems and 

Procedures 



Business 119 

PA 404/Public Policy Analysis 

PA 405/Public Personnel Practices 

PA 501/Internship 

PA 512/Seminar in Public Administration 

EC 314/Public Finance 

LA 101/Business Law I 

Plus two public administration elective 
courses. 

There is one concentration within the B.S. 
in public administration program: health 
administration. 

Concentration in Health 
Administration 

Students earning the B.S. in public 
administration with a concentration in 
health administration must complete the 
university core curriculum, a specified 
selection of courses from the common 
courses for business majors, the common 
courses for public administration majors 
listed above, and the following: 

PA 305/Institutional Budgeting and 

Planning 
PA 308/Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 490/Public Health Administration 

Plus two social science elective courses. 



Minor in Public 
Administration 

To obtain a minor in public 
administration, students must complete 
these courses: 

PA 101/Public Administration 

PA 302/Public Administration Systems and 

Procedures 
PA 405/Public Personnel Practices 

Plus two additional public administration 
courses. 



121 



SCHOOL OF 
ENGINEERING 



M. Jerry Kenig, Ph.D., P.E., dean 
John Sarris, Ph.D., associate dean 
B. Badri Saleeby, Ph.D., associate dean for 

Southeastern Connecticut 
Richard Strauss, B.A., M.P.A., assistant 

dean for administration 

The accomplishments of engineers and 
the practice of engineering pervades and 
sustains our society. Engineering is the art 
of improving the conditions of life for 
human beings with a minimum use of 
resources and adverse alteration to our 
environment. It is based upon experience, 
upon historical precedent and upon 
scientific analysis and experiment. To 
sustain our life style, engineers design and 
build things and systems. 

The School of Engineering at the 
University of New Haven prepares 
individuals for the professional practice of 
engineering, for continual lifelong 
education, and for continued formal and 
graduate education as personal preferences 
and career development require. To 
accomplish the educational goal, the School 
of Engineering requires an education in 
science, in mathematics, and in the 
humanities and social sciences as well as the 
engineering sciences. Each engineering 
discipline emphasizes advanced courses in 
its special areas of expertise. All disciplines 
integrate the use of computers and design in 
their respective engineering courses and 
require appropriate laboratory and 
experimental work. 

The School of Engineering offers 
programs leading to the associate in science 
degree and the bachelor of science degree. 



At the graduate level the School of 
Engineering offers programs leading to the 
master of science degree and the senior 
professional certificate. Detailed information 
on these graduate programs is in the 
Graduate School catalog. 



Programs 

Bachelor of Science 

Chemistry 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Science 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Industrial Technology — Shipbuilding 

Materials Technology 

Mechanical Engineering 

Associate in Science 

Chemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Materials Technology 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Technology — Shipbuilding 

Master of Science 

Computer and Information Science 
Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Operations Research 

Senior Professional Certificate 

Computer Applications and Information 
Systems 



122 



Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to the 
engineering programs should be a graduate 
of a secondary school of approved standing 
and should present 15 acceptable units of 
secondary school work. These should 
include four units of English, two units of 
algebra, one of plane geometry, one half of 
trigonometry and one unit each of physics 
and a second science. Deficiencies in 
English, mathematics and science may be 
satisfied by summer school attendance, or 
by an extension of the stated curriculum for 
one or two semesters chosen to fit the 
student's needs. 

Satisfactory placement in the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT) in mathematics and 
English as given by the College Entrance 
Examination Board, or satisfactory 
placement in the American College Testing 
(ACT) program is required. 

Choosing a Major 

Students in engineering are strongly 
advised to choose their major by the 
beginning of the sophomore year. Students 
who are accepted with academic deficiencies 
must satisfy those deficiencies before 
entering the sophomore year. 

Those students who are unsure of their 
major in their sophomore year, or those 
students who desire to receive formal 
recognition of the completion of an 
associate's degree after two years' work, 
may enroll in the associate in science degree 
program in engineering. 

University Core Curriculum 

In addition to school and department 
requirements, students must fulfill all 
requirements of the university core 
curriculum. See the Core Curriculum section 
of this catalog for more information. 

General Policy of the School of 

Engineering 

The following definitions apply to all 
degree programs within the School of 
Engineering. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer of credits for previous academic 
work is coordinated by the dean's office and 



assessed by department chairs, according to 
school policy, described in the document 
"Guidelines on Transfer Credit Awards." All 
transferred courses are the result of a 
determination of equivalence of course 
content and course level. 

Once accepted as matriculated, students 
who wish to earn credits toward the degree 
through academic work at other institutions 
must secure approval in advance, using the 
"Coordinated Course Authorization" form. 

Free Electives 

A free elective is any credit course offered 
by the university for which the student has 
appropriate preparation. Only faculty 
adviser approval is required. Note: In most 
programs. School of Business courses are 
accepted only as free electives. 

Humanities Electives 

These core courses are from areas of 
humanities or social sciences and are meant 
to bring the engineering student to a better 
awareness of social responsibilities and 
related factors in decision-making 
processes, and to broaden their cultural 
background. 

Mathematics Electives 

These are courses from the mathematics 
department at the 300 or higher level. 
Faculty advisers should be consulted for 
recommendations on the most relevant 
mathematics electives for a student's career 
objectives. 

Technical Electives 

Technical electives are upper-level courses 
directly pertinent to a student's major field 
of study. These electives must be approved 
by the student's faculty adviser and may be 
chosen from engineering school courses. 
Faculty approval is important to ensure that 
students meet the math requirements. 

Professional Accreditation 

The curricula leading to the bachelor's 
degree in civil, electrical, industrial and 
mechanical engineering are accredited by 
the Engineering Accreditation Commission 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (E AC/ ABET). 



Common Courses for 
Engineering Curricula — 
Freshman Year 

Bachelor degree programs for engineering 
majors contain common requirements for 
the freshman year of study. The course 
requirements are listed below: 

Engineering Requirements 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

E 105/Composition 

E no/Composition and Literature 

ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN* 
M n7/Calculus I 
M nS/Calculus II 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Plus 3 credit hours of a humanities /social 
science elective 

*Civil engineering students substitute 
ME 101. 

Humanities and Social 
Sciences Requirements 

In addition to freshman English and 
introductory economics (EC 133), the 
following 15 credits are required for all 
engineering students to satisfy the 
university core: 

3 credits (sociology, political science or 

psychology) 
3 credits (English literature or philosophy) 
3 credits (art, music, or theater) 
3 credits HS 101 (history) 
3 credits selected from E 202, HU 300, 

HS 306, or an SO, P or PS 300-level or 

above course. 



Engineering 123 

Department of 
Chemistry and 
Chemical Engineering 

Chairman: Michael J. Saliby, Ph.D. 

Professors: Peter Desio, Ph.D., University of 
New Hampshire (Organometallics, Ring- 
chain Tautomerism in Orthoacylbenzoic 
acids); George Wheeler, Jacob Finley 
Buckman Professor of Chemistry and 
Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., University 
of Maryland (Biochemistry of Vision; Solid 
State Spectroscopy; Environmental 
Analysis) 

Associate Professors: Michael A. Collura, 
Ph.D., Lehigh University (Process design 
and control; separation processes); 
Michael Saliby, Ph.D., SUNY at 
Binghamton (Thermal and Photochemical 
Reactions of Transition Metal Complexes) 

Jacob Finley Buckman Endowed 

Chair and Scholarships 

The Jacob Finley Buckman Endowed 
Chair of Chemistry and Chemical 
Engineering was established in 1981 by Mrs. 
Clarice Buckman of New Haven in memory 
of her late husband, Jacob Finley Buckman, 
the co-founder of Enthone Corporation. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in career 
fields with their college education. For 
further details see "The Co-op Program" in 
the Student Life section or consult the 
Co-op office. 

Chemistry Club 

The department has a chemistry club that 
is a student affiliate of the American 
Chemical Society. The club is open to all 
students, and all chemistry majors are 
encouraged to join. Club activities include 
projects, field trips, films, group discussions 
and social activities. 



124 



Chemical Engineering Club 

The Chemical Engineering Club has ties 
to the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers (AIChE). It provides students 
with the opportunity to socialize, meet 
chemical engineers working in the area, visit 
process plants and get involved in 
community projects. 



Chemical Engineering 

Chemical engineers are creative problem 
solvers. They apply the fundamental 
principles of chemistry, physics, 
mathematics and economics to the solution 
of practical problems and to the search for 
new knowledge. Traditionally, chemical 
engineers develop, design, optimize and 
operate processes which convert material 
and energy resources into new or improved 
products. It was practitioners of this 
discipline who developed the technological 
infrastructure for industries such as 
chemicals, petroleum products, plastics, 
textiles, pharmaceuticals and food 
processing. 

Currently, chemical engineers are 
concerned with the critical areas of resource 
depletion, energy conservation, recycling, 
pollution control, hazardous waste 
management, improved control of 
processes, increased safety and enhanced 
productivity. The major has also proven to 
be an excellent background for the study of 
law, medicine or business. 

B.S., Chemical Engineering 

The chemical engineering program is 
challenging and demands hard work, but for 
those genuinely interested, it develops the 
required depth of knowledge to embark on 
a fascinating and satisfying professional 
career in industry or government, or to 
continue study at the graduate level. The 
curriculum includes work in chemistry, 
physics, mathematics, computer science, 
electrical and mechanical engineering along 
with advanced preparation in chemical 
engineering. Other courses include social 
sciences, humanities and technical electives. 



The comprehensive laboratory experience 
involves data acquisition and process 
control using micro computers and 
emphasizes safety and communications. 
The latter two areas, as well as problem- 
solving, computer applications, 
environmental concern and design 
activities, are woven throughout the 
curriculum. In the freshman year, chemical 
engineering majors take the same course of 
study as do all other engineering students. 
The first chemical engineering courses are 
taken in the sophomore year, with increased 
focus during the last two years. In the senior 
year, students are involved in 
comprehensive chemical engineering design 
projects, and may choose two technical 
elective courses. The electives in the 
curriculum allow students to design 
programs that fulfill individual needs and 
interest. 

Required Courses 
Sophomore 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 

CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 

CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

CM 201/Fundamentals of Chemical 

Engineering I 
CM 202/Fundamentals of Chemical 

Engineering II 
EE 211/FundamentaIs of Electrical 

Engineering 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
Junior 

CH 331/Physical Chemistry I 
CH 333/Physical Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 332/Physical Chemistry II 
CH 334/Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 
CM 301/Transport Phenomena Analysis 
CM 310/Transport Operations I with 

Laboratory 
CM 311/Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 
CM 321/Reaction Kinetics/Reactor Design 
EC 133/PrincipIes of Economics 



IE 204/Engineering Economics 
M 338/Numerical Analysis I 

Senior 

CM 401/Mass Transfer Operations 
CM 410/Transport Operations II with 

Laboratory 
CM 420/Process Design Principles 
CM 421/Plant and Process Design 
CM 431/Process Dynamics and Control with 

Laboratory 
ES 415/Professional Engineering Seminar 
Elective: Literature or Philosophy 
Elective: Art/Music/Theatre 
Elective: Humanities/Social Science 

Plus 6 credit hours of technical electives 



Chemistry 

Chemists are concerned with the structure 
and analysis of matter and the changes that 
matter undergoes. Today's chemists are 
solving chemical problems and developing 
new substances with the increasing use of 
laboratory instruments. Many of these 
instruments are interfaced with computers 
for rapid data analysis and display. 

Careers for chemists in today's market 
include the rapidly developing fields of 
instrumentation, computers, energy, 
environment, forensics, medicine, safety 
and health, pharmaceuticals, product and 
equipment development, chemical 
engineering, plastics and polymers, 
synthetic fibers, industrial chemistry, 
technical sales and services and 
management. 

The B.S. in chemistry program consists of 
all the courses recommended by the 
American Chemical Society and provides a 
rigorous background well-suited for those 
students who will pursue graduate studies 
in chemistry. The program is also highly 
recommended for pre-medical students. The 
program contains six technical elective 
courses which allow the student to develop 
a concentration in a related field such as 
biology, forensic acience, computer science 
or environmental studies. 

The B. A. program in chemistry appears in 
this catalog under the School of Arts and 
Sciences. 



Engineering 125 

B.S., Chemistry 

Required Courses 

Students majoring in chemistry must 
complete the following courses: 

Freshman 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CS 102/Introduction to Programming/ 

FORTRAN 
E 105/Composition 
E 110/Composition and Literature 
M 117/Calculus I 
M 118/CalcuIus II 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 

CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 

CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
CS 224/Advanced Programming/FORTRAN 
M 203/Calculus III 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Plus social science elective I, HS 101/ 
Foundations of Western World 

Junior 

CH 331/Physical Chemistry I 
CH 333/Physical Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 332/Physical Chemistry II 
CH 334/Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 
CH 351/Qualitative Organic Analysis with 
Laboratory 

Plus two technical electives, one advanced 
chemistry elective, HU 300/Nature of 
Science, literature or philosophy elective, 
art/music/theatre elective, social science 
elective II 

Senior 

CH 411/Chemical Literature 

CH 412/Seminar 

CH 451Arhesis 

CH 501/ Advanced Organic Chemistry I 



126 

CH 521/Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I 
CH 523/Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CH 599/Independent Study 

Plus math/computer/biology elective, four 
technical electives 



B.A., Chemistry 

The B. A. in chemistry program appears in 
the School of Arts and Sciences section of 
this catalog. 



A.S., Chemistry 

Students who wish to earn an associate 
degree in chemistry must take a total of 64- 
66 credit hours including the courses listed 
below: 

Required Courses 
Freshman 

E 105/Composition 

E 110/Composition and Literature 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

M 117/Calculus I 

M 118/Calculus II 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 

CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 

CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 21 1/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
M 203/Calculus III 

Plus 6 credit hours of technical electives, one 
social science elective 



Minor in Chemistry 

Students minoring in chemistry must 
complete 23-24 credit hours including the 
courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 201/Organic Chemistry I 

CH 202/Organic Chemistry II 

CH 203/Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 204/Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH 211/Quantitative Analysis with 

Laboratory 
CH 221/Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 

Department of Civil 
and Environmental 
Engineering 

Chairman: David J. Wall, P.E., Ph.D. 

Professors: M. Hamdy Bechir, Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
George R. Carson, M.S.C.E., Columbia 
University; Ross M. Lanius, Jr., M.S.C.E., 
University of Connecticut, M.S.C.I.S., 
University of New Haven; David J. Wall, 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Associate Professors: Gregory P. Broderick, 
Ph.D., University of Texas; R. Yucel 
Tokuz, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Civil engineering deals with planning, 
designing and constructing facilities serving 
humanity. These services are diversified and 
include the reduction of air and water 
pollution; transportation of people, 
materials and power; renewal of 
infrastructure; development of new 
communities, water supplies, power lines, 
railroads and tunnels; all with the least 
disturbance to the environment. 

A civil engineer must have a solid 
background in mathematics, basic science. 



communication skills, engineering science, 
engineering design and humanities. The 
curriculum is designed to meet these basic 
criteria and is accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (A.B.E.T.). The first two years 
of study include mathematics, basic sciences 
and communication skills. The junior year is 
common to all civil engineering students 
and provides a basic background in 
engineering science. In the senior year, 
concentrated engineering design courses are 
available in the areas of geotechnical 
engineering, structures, surveying, 
transportation and water resources. 
Through the senior project and independent 
study, an in-depth study of a specialized 
field is available. Humanities courses are 
included at all levels. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in career 
fields with their college education. For 
further details see "The Co-op Program" in 
the Student Life section or consult the 
Co-op office. 

Student Chapter of the American 

Society of Civil Engineers 

There is an active student chapter of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers at the 
university. The chapter sponsors technical 
lectures, field trips and social activities. 

Chi Epsilon 

Students with high academic records are 
nominated annually for membership in Chi 
Epsilon, the national honor society for civil 
engineers. 

B.S., Civil Engineering 

Students must complete a total of 136 
credit hours for a degree in civil engineering, 
including the engineering requirements for 
the freshman year listed earlier in this 
section and the university core 
requirements. They are also expected to earn 
a cumulative quality point ratio of no less 



Engineering 127 

than 2.0 in all civil engineering courses and 
technical electives. The required courses for 
the final three years of the program are listed 
below: 

Required Courses 
Sophomore 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials 

CE 206/Engineering Geology 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
IE 204/Engineering Economics 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 
ME 204/Dynamics 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Plus humanities/social science electives 

Junior 

CE 203/Elementary Surveying 

CE 301/Transportation Engineering 

CE 302/Building Construction 

CE 304/Soil Mechanics 

CE 306/Hydraulics 

CE 312/Structural Analysis 

CE 315/Environmental Engineering and 

Sanitation 
CE 317/Structural Design Fundamentals 
CE 323/Mechanics and Structures 

Laboratory 
CE 325/Project Planning and Schedule 
M 311/Linear Algebra or M 371/Probability 

and Statistics I 

Plus humanities/social science electives 

Senior 

CE 327/Soil Mechanics and Concrete 

Laboratory 
CE 328/Hydraulics and Environmental 

Laboratory 
CE 407/Professionalism and Ethical Practice 

of Engineering 
CE/501 Senior Project 

EE 211/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 

Plus humanities/social science electives, 9 
credit hours of civil engineering technical 
electives of which 6 credits must be civil 
engineering design courses 



128 



A.S., Civil Engineering 

Students who wish to earn an associate 
degree in civil engineering must complete a 
total of 60-61 credit hours including the 
courses listed below: 

Freshman 

E 105/Composition 

E 110/Composition and Literature 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 
M 117/Calculus I 
ME 101/Engineering Graphics 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials 
CE 203/Elementary Surveying 
CE 301/Transportation Engineering 
CE 302/Building Construction 
M 118/Calculus II 

PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory 

Plus any two of the following courses: 

CE 206/Engineering Geology 

CE 325/Pro)ect Planning and Scheduling 

IE 204/Engineering Economics 

M 203/Calculus III 

Minor in Civil Engineering 

Students are required to complete 18 
credit hours of civil engineering courses for 
the minor. With the approval of the 
chairman, engineering majors may 
substitute other civil engineering courses for 
a minor. 

Required Courses 

Six courses are to be taken from the 
following list: 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials 

CE 203/Elementary Surveying 

CE 301/Transportation Engineering 



CE 302/Building Construction 

CE 304/Soil Mechanics 

CE 306/Hydraulics 

CE 315/Environmental Engineering and 

Sanitation 
CE 407/Professionalism and Ethical Practice 

of Engineering 



Department of 
Electrical and 
Computer 
Engineering 

Chairman: Daniel C. O'Keefe, Ph.D. 

Professors: Gerald J. Kirwin, Ph.D., 
Syracuse University; Daniel C. O'Keefe, 
Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; 
Kantilal K. Surti, Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut 

Associate Professors: Bouzid Aliane, Ph.D., 
Polytechnic Institute of New York; 
Andrew J. Fish, Jr., Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut; Paul R. Moon, Ph.D., 
University of Manitoba 

Assistant Professors: Ali M. Golbazi, Ph.D., 
Wayne State University; Bijan Karimi, 
Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Electrical engineers are concerned with 
energy and signals. They apply 
fundamental principles to the design of 
systems and devices for the generation, 
transmission and control of energy. Their 
activities include the coding of information 
into electrical signals and the processing of 
these signals in various computer systems. 

The domain of electrical engineering 
encompasses many practical and diverse 
technologies including electronics, power 
systems, communication systems, control 
systems, computer architecture, 
microprocessors, electromagnetics, signal 
and information processing and optical 
signal processing. 

Electrical engineers serve in many 
professional capacities, all of which require 



a thorough understanding of the scientific 
principles that govern electrical phenomena. 
As designers, they use existing devices and 
techniques to meet the challenges of 
industry for developing more efficient, 
precise or reliable apparatus. These activities 
often lead to new concepts and techniques 
and sometimes, to the discovery of new 
phenomena. The technical complexity of the 
services or products provided by many 
companies requires personnel with 
appropriate educational backgrounds. As a 
result, electrical engineers also find 
employment opportunities in sales, 
customer service and maintenance. 

An undergraduate program in electrical 
engineering must prepare the student for a 
career in a field where new developments 
occur rapidly. Therefore, it is imperative that 
a program of studies in engineering be 
heavily concentrated in the basic principles 
of the discipline. 

At the University of New Haven, electrical 
engineering students divide their efforts 
between the tasks of learning engineering 
analysis methods and the techniques of 
electrical system design. Examples of 
modern applications associated with 
practical analysis and design problems are 
presented in lecture and laboratory courses. 
Because the origins of engineering methods 
are based in the sciences of chemistry, 
mathematics and physics, these subjects are 
an important part of the program of studies. 

Electrical engineering students have direct 
access to the department laboratories. The 
department has recently expanded its 
laboratory facilities to include state-of-the- 
art instruments in various disciplines, 
including communication systems and 
signal processing, control systems, digital 
systems, fiber optics, and power systems. 
Department laboratory computing facilities 
include AT&T 6300 Personal Computers, 
Motorola 68000 and Intel 8086 
microprocessors, Texas Instruments 32020 
digital signal processors and Hewlett 
Packard 9000 series 300 workstations. 

Electrical engineering students should 
possess good analytical abilities including 
sound mathematical competence. They 
should also have a natural curiosity about 



Engineering 129 

the multitude of technical devices 
encountered in everyday life, a willingness 
to learn the principles that make these 
devices possible and a desire to create new 
devices and methods of solving problems. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work in their 
career field. For further details see "The Co- 
op Program" in the Student Life section or 
consult the Co-op Office. 

Student Societies 

The department of electrical and 
computer engineering sponsors a student 
section of the Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers. This organization 
supports visiting lecturers and field trips to 
surrounding industrial sites. Eta Kappa Nu, 
the national honor society for electrical and 
computer engineers, has the Zeta Rho 
Chapter at the university to honor superior 
students and to encourage high scholastic 
achievements. 



B.S., Electrical Engineering 

The BSEE program is accredited by the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission of 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (E AC/ABET). Students must 
complete a total of 131 credit hours for a 
degree in electrical engineering including 
the requirements for the freshman year 
listed earlier in this section. Humanities or 
social science electives must be selected so 
as to fulfill the core curriculum requirements 
of the university. 

Technical elective courses in the BSEE 
program must be selected from upper level 
offerings (third or fourth year) under the 
guidance and approval of the student's 
academic adviser. At least three must be 
electrical and computer engineering 
departmental courses. 

This component of the curriculum is 
identified with the career interests of the 
student and provides the opportunity to 
concentrate some study in one or more of 



130 

the several branches within the discipline. 
The department offers a variety of advanced 
courses including digital electronics, 
physical electronics, digital design, 
computer architecture, microprocessors, 
analog and digital filter design, 
communications systems, electromagnetic 
waves, power systems and transmission, 
fiber optics, electric machines and control 
systems. 

Required Courses 
Sophomore 

EE 201/Basic Circuits I 

EE 202/Basic Circuits II 

EE 253/Electrical Engineering Laboratory I 

EE 255/Digital Systems I 

M 203/Calculus III 

M 204/Differential Equations 

CE 201/Statics 

ME 204/Dynamics 

PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
EC 133/Principles of Economics I 

Plus art/music/theatre elective 

Junior 

EE 301/Network Analysis 

EE 302/Systems Analysis 

EE 347/Electronics I 

EE 348/Electronics II 

EE 349/Electrical Engineering Laboratory II 

EE 371/Computer Engineering 

ME 301/Thermodynamics I 

Plus one mathematics elective, social science 
elective, literature/philosophy elective 

Senior 

EE 420/Random Signal Analysis 

EE 457/Electrical Engineering Laboratory III 

EE 458/Electrical Engineering Design 

Laboratory 
EE 461/Electromagnetic Theory 
IE 204 Engineering Economics 
ES 415/Professional Engineering Seminar 

Plus four technical electives and upper level 
humanities/social science elective 

A.S., Electrical Engineering 

upon successful completion of 63-64 
credits of designated courses, including all 
of the courses in the freshman year, a 



student may be granted the associate's 
degree in electrical engineering. All of these 
courses are also a part of the B.S. in electrical 
engineering requirements and most 
students continue their enrollment after 
receiving their A.S. 

Minor in Electrical 
Engineering 

A student may obtain a minor in electrical 
engineering by completing the following 
courses: 

EE 201/Basic Circuits I 

EE 202/Basic Circuits II 

EE 253/Electrical Engineering Lab I 

EE 255/Digital Systems I 

One of the following sequences: 

EE 347, EE 348/Electronics I, II 

EE 371, EE 356/Computer Engineering, 

Digital Systems II 
EE 301, EE 302/Network Analysis, Systems 

Analysis 

The student will also fulfill the 
prerequisites for these courses. 

Students contemplating either a minor or 
an associate's degree should consult with 
the department chairman early in their 
program. 

Department of 
Industrial 
Engineering and 
Computer Science 

Chairman: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Eng.Sc.D. 

Professors: Roger G. Frey, Ph.D., Yale 
University; Edward T. George, D.Eng., 
Yale University; William S. Gere, Ph.D., 
Carnegie-Mellon University; Ira H. 
Kleinfeld, Eng.Sc.D., Columbia 
University; Richard A. Mann, Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin; Alexis N. 
Sommers, Ph.D., Purdue University; 
Ronald Wentworth, Ph.D., Purdue 
University 



Associate Professors: Bih-Lin Cho, Ph.D., 
University of Missouri; Alice Fischer, 
Ph.D., Harvard University; Norman 
Hosay, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; 
M. Ali Montazer, Ph.D., SUNY at Buffalo; 
Howard Okrent, Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professors: William Adams, M.S., 
University of New Haven; Matthew 
Sanders, Ph.D., Texas Technical 
University 

Instructor: Gary Walters, M.S., University of 
New Haven 

Senior Lecturer: Priscilla H. Griscom, M.S., 
University of New Haven 

The department of industrial engineering 
and computer science offers two distinct 
baccalaureate degree programs: a B.S. in 
industrial engineering; and a B.S. in 
computer science. The objectives and career 
opportunities associated with each are 
described below. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in career 
fields with their college education. For 
further details see "The Co-op Program" in 
the Student Life section or consult the Co- 
op office. 

Student Chapters 

Students are eligible to join, at a reduced 
rate, the student chapter of the Institute of 
Industrial Engineers. It is affiliated with a 
local senior chapter, enabling students to 
develop a sense of the practice of the 
profession. Or, one may choose 
membership in the Student Chapter of the 
Association of Computing Machinery. 

B.S., Industrial Engineering 

Industrial engineers determine the most 
effective methods of using the basic factors 
of production — manpower, machinery and 
materials. Expertise provided by industrial 
engineers will be increasingly important as 
our industries struggle to improve 



Engineering 131 

productivity and competitiveness in 
manufacturing, service and trade. Industrial 
engineers are needed in manufacturing, in 
service industries such as hospitals and 
utilities, in trade and commerce such as 
banks and insurance companies, and in 
consulting firms. In addition, industrial 
engineers are among the most upwardly 
mobile of those in the engineering 
profession, by virtue of their training and 
experience. Many industrial engineers have 
attained top management positions in a 
variety of industries. 

The department's program in industrial 
engineering gives students a broad 
engineering background during the first two 
years. In the last two years the required 
courses in industrial engineering are taken 
in addition to electives which enable the 
student to tailor one's studies to his own 
interests such as operations research, 
systems analysis, manufacturing systems, 
or computer science. Concentrations are 
available in quality control engineering and 
manufacturing systems engineering. This 
program is the only one of its kind offered 
in Connecticut and it is accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET). 

Students have the opportunity to use the 
laboratories in human factors, artificial 
intelligence, robotics, computer vision and 
manufacturing and the university's 
computer center. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in industrial 
engineering must complete 130 credit hours 
including the university core curriculum. 
These courses must include the freshman 
requirements listed earlier in this section, 41 
credit hours in industrial engineering 
courses and 6 credit hours of technical 
electives chosen in consultation with the 
student's adviser. Technical electives are 
generally junior- or senior-level courses in 
industrial engineering. 

Sophomore 

CE 201/Statics 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 
FORTRAN 



132 



CS 224/Advanced Programming/FORTRAN 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 
IE 204/Engineering Economics 
IE 214/Engineering Management 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 
ME 204/Dynamics 

PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory 

Junior 

CE 202/Strength of Materials 

EE 211/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 

IE 303/Cost Control 

IE 304/Production Control 

IE 343AVork Design 

IE 346/Probability Analysis 

IE 347/Statistical Analysis 

IE 348/Manufacturing Processes 

Plus English literature or philosophy/social 
science elective 

Senior 

HU 300/Humanities — Nature of Science 

ES 415/Professional Engineering Seminar 

IE 344/Human Factors Engineering 

IE 435/Simulation 

IE 436/Quality Control 

IE 443/Facilities Planning 

IE 402/Operations Research 

Plus two technical electives, MT 200 
Engineering Materials, fine arts elective 

A.S., Industrial Engineering 

This two-year associate degree program is 
designed for the student who wishes an 
earlier entrance to the job market. All credits 
can be applied toward the B.S. in industrial 
engineering at a later date. 

Minor in Industrial 
Engineering 

Engineering students may minor in 
industrial engineering by completing 18 
credit hours of industrial engineering 
courses. The required courses for the minor 
are listed below. 

Required Courses 

IE 204/Engineering Economics 
IE 303/Cost Control 



IE 304/Production Control 
IE 343AA^ork Design 
IE 402/Operations Research 
IE 443/Facilities Planning 

B.S., Computer Science 

This program follows the Association for 
Computing Machinery guidelines for an 
undergraduate computer science degree. It 
is intended to prepare students either for 
graduate school in computer science or for a 
job as a systems or applications 
programmer. Eventually graduates can 
expect to hold positions such as software 
engineer, system designer, freelance 
software consultant and programming 
manager. 

The computer science program includes 
instruction in several programming 
languages, a strong base in mathematics, 
and intermediate courses in methods and 
systems. Advanced courses in various areas 
may be elected. The student will choose 
some area of high interest outside of the 
computer science department and pursue a 
specialization in that field. These courses 
must be approved by his or her adviser and 
are designated as specialization electives. 

Required Courses 

A total of 129 credit hours including the 
university core curriculum is required for the 
bachelor of science in computer science. 
Because this is not a typical engineering 
program, the freshman year curriculum is 
different from the other engineering 
disciplines, and is included below. 

Freshman 

CS 106/Introduction to PASCAL 

CS 226/Data Structures and Algorithms I 

M 117/Calculus I 

M 118/Calculus II 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
E 105/Composition 
E 110/Composition and Literature 
HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 

Plus social science elective, fine arts/music/ 
theater elective 



Sophomore 

CS 230/Introduction to Systems 

Programming/C & UNIX 
CS 234/Machine Organization/Assembly 

Language 
CS 237/Data Structures and Algorithms II 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 270/Discrete Structures 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
IE 204/Engineering Economics 
PL 210/Symbolic Logic 

Plus social science elective, specialization 
elective 1, specialization elective 2 

Junior 

CS 228/Intensive FORTRAN 

CS 310/Computing Theory 

CS 320/Operating Systems 

CS 337/Introduction to Data Base Systems 

CS 338/Structure of Programming 

Languages 
IE 346/Probability Analysis 
IE 347/Statistical Analysis 

/Restricted Elective 1 
HU 300/The Nature of Science 

Plus literature or philosophy elective, 
specialization elective 3 

Senior 

CS 437/Data Base Design 

CS 420/Software Design and Development 

CS/Elective 

CS/Elective 

CS/Elective 

EE 255/Digital Systems I 

/Restricted Elective 2 

/Restricted Elective 3 
E 225/Technical Writing and Presentations 
ES 415/Professional Engineering Seminar 

/Specialization Elective 4 

A.S., Computer Science 

This two-year associate's program is 
designed for the student who wishes an 
earlier entrance into the job market. All 
credits can be applied toward the B.S. in 
computer science degree at a later date. 



Engineering 133 

Minor in Computer Science 

Required Courses 

CS 106/lntroduction to Programming/ 

PASCAL 
CS 226/Data Structures and Algorithms I 
CS 228/Intensive FORTRAN 
CS 230/Introduction to Systems 

Programming/C & UNIX 
CS 234/Machine Organization and Assembly 

Language 
CS 237/Data Structures and Algorithms II 
CS 320/Operating Systems 

Department of 

Mechanical 

Engineering 

Chairman: John Sarris, Ph.D. 

Professors: M. Jerry Kenig, Ph.D., Princeton 
University; Konstantine C. Lambrakis, 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; 
Stephen M. Ross, Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University; B. Badri Saleeby, 
Ph.D., Northwestern University; John 
Sarris, Ph.D., Tufts University; Richard 
M. Stanley, Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professors: Carl Barratt, Ph.D., 
Cambridge University; Oleg Faigel, 
Ph.D., Moscow Polytechnic Institute; 
Ismail Orabi, Ph.D., Clarkson University 

Senior Lecturer: M.N. Parthasarathi, Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

The department of mechanical 
engineering has a long history of success in 
producing outstanding graduates in the 
field of thermal sciences, fluids and design. 
To ensure that graduates will continue to 
distinguish themselves in either graduate 
school or the practice of engineering, the 
department places emphasis on the 
scientific foundation of the curriculum and 
on the breadth and scope of the professional 
courses. Implicit in this emphasis is a 
demand for a high level of maturity and 
flexibility on the part of the student. 



134 

The rapid advances in science and 
technology require that mechanical 
engineers, as generalists among engineers, 
not only have a thorough understanding of 
basic scientific principles, but also have an 
appreciation of human values and an 
awareness of the effects of their contribution 
to the social, professional, economic and 
ecological climate in which they work. 

Several options for concentration at the 
senior year are available for a student to 
pursue. At that level, restricted elective 
courses may be selected, with the help of the 
student's faculty adviser, which offer the 
opportunity for further learning in areas 
such as fluids, energy, design, heat transfer, 
numerical analysis and computers, 
aerospace sciences and control systems. 

Exceptional students having an overall 
average of 3.50 or better may join the Delta 
Zeta Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma honorary 
fraternity which provides the opportunity 
for closer relations with the faculty and other 
prominent individuals in the field for the 
purpose of further professional 
development, involvement in faculty 
research and varied social and intellectual 
activities. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in career 
fields with their college education. For 
further details see "The Co-op Program" in 
the Student Life section or consult the Co- 
op office. 

Student Chapter of A.S.M.E. 

Membership in the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers student section is 
open to all mechanical engineering students 
of good standing and provides the 
opportunity for field trips to local industrial 
establishments, social activities and reading 
of interesting professional literature. 



B.S., Mechanical Engineering 

Required Courses 

Students earning the bachelor of science 
in mechanical engineering are required to 
complete 134 credit hours including the 
university core curriculum. Requirements 
include the freshman year courses listed 
earlier in this section and those listed below: 

Sophomore 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials I 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 
ME 101/Engineering Graphics 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 215/Instrumentation Laboratory 
MT 200/Engineering Materials 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory 

Plus 6 credit hours of humanities electives 

Junior 

EC 133/Principles of Economics I 

EE 201/Basic Circuits I 

EE 202/Basic Circuits II 

ME 301/Thermodynamics I 

ME 302/Thermodynamics II 

ME 307/Solid Mechanics 

ME 315/Mechanics Laboratory 

ME 330/FundamentaIs of Mechnical Design 

ME 344/Mechanics of Vibration 

Plus 3 credit hours of a mathematics elective 
(M 303, M 309, M 338, M403 or M 423), 
3 credit hours of a social science elective 

Senior 

ES 415/Professional Engineering Seminar 

IE 204/Engineering Economics 

ME 404/Heat and Mass Transfer 

ME 415/Thermo/Fluids Laboratory 

ME 421/Fluid Mechanics 

ME 422/Gas Dynamics 

ME 431/Mechanical Engineering Design I 

ME 432/Mechanical Engineering Design II 

Plus 3 credit hours of a science elective (200 
or higher level course in physics, 
chemistry or biology), 6 credit hours of 
technical electives*, 3 credit hours of 
humanities/social science elective 

*To ensure that students meet the math requirements of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(A.B.E.T.), technical electives must be chosen in 
consultation with the student's adviser. 



B.S., Materials Technology 

Director: M.N. Parthasarathi, Ph.D. 

The performance of virtually every 
electrical, mechanical and structural device 
is limited ultimately by the materials from 
which it is made. The materials engineer is 
the expert on materials selection who must 
weigh the relative merits of metals against 
plastics and specify material for everything 
from ceramic magnets to aerospace 
composite fiber materials. The materials 
engineer is also the controller of materials 
processing during manufacture. This might 
include such diverse specialities as powder 
metallurgy, plastic extrusion, metal heat 
treatment and vapor deposition, to name 
but a few fabrication techniques. 

The bachelor of science degree program in 
materials technology provides a broad core 
curriculum to develop an understanding of 
the fundamental principles common to all 
materials. It also incorporates elective 
courses to enable the student to specialize in 
a particular materials technology field. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the bachelor of science 
in materials technology are required to 
complete 124 credit hours, including the 
university core curriculum and those 
courses listed below: 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials I 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/GeneraI Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
EC 133/Principles of Economics I 
EE 211/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 
ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 
HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 
M nS/Pre-Calculus Mathematics 
M n7/Calculus I 
M 118/Calculus II 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 
MT 219/Physical Metallurgy 
MT 304/Mechanical Behavior of Materials 



Engineering 135 

MT 310/Materials Laboratory 

MT 342/Steels and Their Heat Treatment 

MT 500/Research Project 

PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Plus 12 credit hours of materials electives, 
21 credit hours of technical electives, 
3 credit hours of a free elective 

A.S., Mechanical Engineering 

The associate degree in mechanical 
engineering is not designed to be a terminal 
degree. It simply provides formal evidence 
that the student has completed about one- 
half of the bachelor's program. Students 
wishing to earn an associate degree in 
mechanical engineering must complete 60- 
61 credit hours, corresponding to the 
courses listed below: 

Freshman 

E 105/Composition 

E 110/Composition and Literature 

ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
M 117/Calculus I 
ME 101/Engineering Graphics 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials I 
M 118/Calculus II 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 
MT 200/Engineering Materials 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory 

Plus any two of the following courses: 

IE 204/Engineering Economics 

M 203/Calculus III 

ME 302/Thermodynamics II 

ME 307/Solid Mechanics 

ME 330/Fundamentals of Mechanical Design 



136 

A.S., Materials Technology 

The associate degree in materials 
technology is not designed to be a terminal 
degree. It simply provides formal evidence 
that the student has completed about one- 
half of the bachelor's program. Students 
wishing to earn an associate degree in 
materials technology must complete 64 
credit hours, corresponding to the following 
courses: 

E 105/Composition 

E 110/Composition and Literature 

ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 

CE 201/Statics 

CE 202/Strength of Materials I 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 116/General Chemistry II 

CH 117/General Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH 118/General Chemistry Laboratory II 

CS 102/Introduction to Computers/ 

FORTRAN 
M 115/Pre-Calculus Mathematics 
M117/Calculusl 
M118/CalcuIusII 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 
MT 219/Physical Metallurgy 
MT 310/Materials Laboratory 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

Plus any two of the following courses: 

EE 211/Principles of Electrical Engineering I 

MT 304/Mechanical Behavior of Materials 

MT 331/Nonferrous Metallurgy 

MT 342/Steels and Their Heat Treatment 

Minor in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Students wishing to minor in mechanical 
engineering must complete the following 
courses with a minimum QPR of 2.0. 

ME 101/Engineering Graphics 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics I 
Plus three courses among the 300- or 400- 
level M.E. courses. (Students with general 



interest in mechanical engineering are 
advised to select ME 330, ME 344 and ME 
421.) 



Shipbuilding 
Technologies 

(UNH in Southeastern 
Connecticut) 

Director: B. Badri Saleeby, Ph.D. 
Program Coordinator: Oliver H. Porter, 
M.A., M.S. 

Two degree programs and one logistics 
certificate option in shipbuilding 
technologies are offered at UNH's 
Southeastern branch. All courses are taught 
in the evening on a trimester calender. 
Selected courses also are offered during the 
summer. While developed for personnel 
acquainted with shipbuilding, the programs 
are applicable to any manufacturing or 
construction endeavor dealing with large, 
complex, mechanical electronic systems. 
The degree programs are: 

A.S. Mechanical Technology: 
shipbuilding concentration 

B.S. Industrial Technology: shipbuilding 
concentration with an optional 
certificate in Logistics (Defense Sector) 

These programs are intended to develop 
and broaden a student's ability to 
communicate, to problem-solve, and to 
manage within large industrial 
organizations. Technical subjects include 
basic engineering mechanics, marine 
engineering, naval architecture, nuclear and 
fossil fuel power plants and electrical 
components, cost and quality control, 
logistics, computers, and related fields. 
Many students find that the A.S. level 
program allows them to develop academic 
skills that they can apply for traditional 
engineering degree programs. 

Students admitted into the programs are, 
for the most part, experienced in 



shipbuilding or similar industrial work. 
Those skilled in a particular trade such as 
shipfitters, welders, pipefitters, electricians, 
machinists, and draftsmen, are especially 
appropriate. For these tradesmen, the 
programs provide an opportunity for job 
related academic advancement. 

A.S., Mechanical Technology: 
Shipbuilding 

Students earning the A.S. degree must 
complete 60-67 credit hours including the 
courses listed below: 
SB 101/Introduction to Shipbuilding 
SB 102/Basic Ship Stability 
SB 201/Elements of Ship Propulsion 

Plus one additional shipbuilding course, 
9 credits in general engineering courses, 
12 credits in technical/management 
electives, 4-11 credits in mathematics 
(depending on math placement), 14 credits 
in science, 9 credits in English and social 
science 

A.S. degree students can choose their 
electives so as to develop a program 
emphasis which leads to engineering 
studies (transferring at the A.S. level into 
mechanical, industrial or other branches of 
engineering study), to business studies, or 
to continuing shipbuilding studies. 

B.S., Industrial Technology: 
Shipbuilding 

The B.S. degree program emphasizes the 
large scale production management of ships 
and submarines. Though some A.S. 
shipbuilding graduates may transfer into 
engineering or business programs, many 
will find the B.S. shipbuilding program to be 
the most appropriate continuation of their 
studies. The B.S. level program builds upon 
the A.S. program, advancing the same 
career continuing education purposes 
(increased job responsibility, skills 
development and upgrade, academic status, 
career mobility). 

The program consists of 68 credit hours of 
study in addition to the A.S. program 
requirements. These additional credits 



Engineering 137 

include coursework in industrial 
management, continued mathematics and 
engineering science studies, university core 
humanities requirements, and 15 restricted 
elective credits chosen from scientific, 
management, logistics, or engineering 
subjects related to shipbuilding. 

Logistics Certificate 
(Defense Sectors) 

Logistics is an emerging discipline which 
has become critical to the efficient 
development and operational support of 
complex, costly systems. Its subdivisions 
include customer requirements planning, 
life-cycle analysis, transportation and 
distribution, field support networks, 
configuration control, design to cost, 
reliability, etc. As a modern day science, 
logistics ensures that needs are met when 
they occur and with a reasonable resource 
expenditure. UNH offers the following 
undergraduate certificate as well as two 
graduate certificates in logistics. 

The five-course certificate sequence 
provides students with a working 
knowledge of defense sector logistics and 
covers topics included in the Certified 
Professional Logistician examination of the 
Society of Logistics Engineers. These 
undergraduate level courses are designed 
for professionals who either do not hold a 
college degree or who earned degrees in 
non-technical fields of study. Prerequisite 
courses in mathematics, computer science, 
economics and statistics are needed. 

Credits earned in this certificate may be 
applied toward a baccalaurete degree in 
industrial technology or as a concentration 
in the associate degree of mechanical 
technology. 

The five course series for the logistics 
certificate includes: 

LG 300/Defense Sector Logistics 

LG 310/Introduction to Logistics Support 

Analysis 
LG 320/Reliability and Maintainability 

Fundamentals 
LG 410/Life Cycle Concepts 
LG 440/Data Management in Logistics 

Systems 



138 



Transfer Credit 

Students may receive credit for 
appropriate and satisfactory course work 
completed at any accredited college or 
university. See academic regulations 
elsewhere in this catalog. 



Further Information 

For more detailed program information, 
call or write: Program coordinator for 
industrial technology with shipbuilding 
emphasis. University of New Haven in 
Southeastern Connecticut, 224 Eastern Point 
Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340. 
Telephone: (203) 449-6772 or (203) 449-8500. 



141 



SCHOOL OF HOTEL, 
RESTAURANT AND 
TOURISM 
ADMINISTRATION 



The School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration serves the feeding, 
lodging, tourism, health care and 
recreational industries. Our graduates 
furnish the managerial talent needed by 
hotels, motor inns, resorts, health care 
institutions, private clubs, restaurants and 
travel facilities. Professional management is 
absolutely necessary to meet the increasing 
governmental, financial and operational 
complexities of the industry. 

An explosive rate of expansion is 
predicted, both nationally and 
internationally, for hospitality enterprises 
during the final decade of this century. 
Virtually all nations are looking for 
American talents and know-how in hotel/ 
motel, food service and tourism operations. 
These conditions generate a great demand 
for hospitality management graduates with 
motivation, experience and education, who 
can move with the tide and start climbing 
the career ladders in the hospitality 
industry. 

Hotel, food service, health care and travel 
professionals have careers that are 
challenging and rewarding. Job 
opportunities range from managing small 
restaurants to directing large hotel and 
resort complexes, with employment 



possibilities in the U.S. and abroad, from 
small towns to major cities and from 
seashore to ski country. 

Programs and Concentrations 

Bachelor of Science* 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Tourism and Travel Administration 

Associate Degree* 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Tourism and Travel Administration 

Certificate Programs 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Tourism and Travel Administration 
Master of Business Administration 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Concentration 
Tourism and Travel Administration 

Concentration 
Senior Professional Certificates 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

*The Bachelor of Science in General Dietetics and the 
Associate of Science in Dietetic Technology is under 
temporary academic suspension. 

Practicum 

Because of the unique nature of the 
hospitality industry and the diverse 
exposure to hands-on experience that is 



142 



highly recommended by industry leaders, 
the student will be required to complete a 
total of 500 hours of field experience for the 
associate degree, and 1,000 hours for the 
bachelor's degree. The practicum will be 
administered by an HRTA coordinator and 
all students should see their respective 
department chair for specific details. 

The Co-op Program 

The school participates in the cooperative 
education program, a unique educational 
strategy that results in a planned, integrated 
program of work and study. 

Co-op affords the student the opportunity 
of seeing the practical application of 
classroom theory to the world of work, of 
sampling career possibilities, and of gaining 
valuable work experience before graduation. 
Currently, the school participates in 
cooperative education programs with major 
local and national hospitality organizations 
including Walt Disney World, Marriott, 
Hyatt and Sheraton, among many others. 
For further details, see the "Co-op Program" 
in the Student Life section or consult the 
Co-op Office. 

Hotel/Restaurant Society 

The purpose and functions of the Hotel/ 
Restaurant Society are: to promote and 
develop professionalism in the hospitality 
industry; to provide special services to 
clientele in order to support club operations 
and professional functions; to attend 
national conferences, expositions, hotel/ 
restaurant shows and seminars, and to 
provide a means of fellowship and 
camaraderie among students enrolled in 
hospitality programs. Students are urged to 
become members of the club and participate 
in the numerous social, academic and 
catering functions throughout the year. 

Travel Club 

Established as a means of actively 
promoting tourism, the Travel Club 
provides a forum for interested tourism and 
travel administration majors. Members 
attend tourism conventions, plan social 
functions, host educational seminars and 
explore career possibilities by meeting with 



prominent travel professionals from various 
areas within the industry. All tourism and 
travel administration majors are encouraged 
to join and actively support and participate 
in the activities of the club. 

Hotel Sales and Marketing 

Association Club 

This student club represents an 
educational organization of more than 6,500 
sales-minded hotel/motel executives who 
manage properties of all types and sizes in 
more than 90 countries around the world. 

Founded in 1927, one of HSMA's primary 
objectives is — through educational 
programs, conventions, career development 
workshops and printed literature — to 
exchange and interchange the latest 
information, ideas and sales techniques as 
they relate to hospitality industry 
marketing. Overall, HSMA's basic purpose 
is to advance the knowledge and upgrade 
the professionalism of those engaged in the 
selling and servicing of rooms, food and 
beverages. 

HSMA offers its student/faculty members 
many unique opportunities to learn about 
the vital aspects of sales and marketing in 
today's hospitality industry. This 
knowledge will be of high practical use not 
only for those seeking a career in hotel/motel 
sales, but equally for anyone who aspires to 
any type of administrative or executive 
position in the lodging, feeding or travel 
fields. 

Eta Sigma Delta 

In 1978 a group of students from the 
Univerity of New Hampshire's Whittemore 
School of Business and Economics identified 
a need to recognize hospitality/tourism 
students for outstanding academic 
achievement, meritorious service and 
demonstrated professionalism. Honor 
societies existed for other disciplines, but 
not for the field of study serving one of the 
world's largest industries. 

As a special project, the students 
researched and evaluated a variety of 
options for fulfilling this need. The end 
result was the establishment of the first 
chapter of Eta Sigma Delta International 



Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 143 



Hospitality Management Honor Society. 

Eta Sigma Delta (ESD) has since grown to 
include over 35 chapters. In 1985, 
responsibility for the administration of ESD 
was transferred to the Council on Hotel, 
Restaurant and Institutional Education 
(CHRIE). CHRIE maintains all membership 
records and files, processes new member- 
ship applications and certificates, publishes 
the ESD newsletter and plans special 
activities for members of ESD through its 
headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

The School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration established a 
chapter of Eta Sigma Delta in the fall of 1989. 
Please contact the school for eligibility 
requirements. 

Club Managers' Association of 

America, Student Chapter 

The purpose of the student chapter of the 
Club Managers' Association is to make 
students more aware of club management 
and its overall function in the hospitality 
industry. The chapter visits various clubs in 
the Connecticut area and takes part in many 
of their meetings and workshops. 

Professional Associations 

The School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration sustains 
membership in the following hospitality 
professional associations: 
Council on Hotel, Restaurant and 

Institutional Education 
National Restaurant Association 
American Hotel/Motel Association 
Club Managers Association of America 
Hotel Sales and Marketing Association 
International Association of Hospitality 

Accountants 
Association of Hospitality Financial 

Management Educators 
Food Service Executives Association 
Home Economists in Business 
American Society of Travel Agents 
Pacific Area Travel Association 
Society of Travel and Tourism Educators 
Connecticut Restaurant Association 
Connecticut Hotel/Motel Association 
Connecticut Club Managers' Association 



American Society of Travel Agents 

National Tour Association 

Society of Travel and Tourism Educators 

Placement 

A student in the University of New 
Haven's School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration receives help in 
finding interesting, satisfying work in his or 
her chosen field in many ways throughout 
his or her college years. The school and its 
faculty are known to hospitality executives 
throughout the nation. The student, 
through attendance and participation in 
seminars, lectures and industry 
conventions, has ample opportunity to meet 
interesting and important people in the 
field. The school also maintains, in 
cooperation with Career Development, an 
active placement service to help students 
obtain hospitality-related jobs during the 
academic year as well as to assist them in 
finding permanent positions. 

Many firms send representatives to our 
campus in an effort to seek qualified 
candidates for possible employment. 
Corporations such as Hyatt, Marriott, 
Sheraton, Walt Disney World, Westin and 
other similar firms have visited our school 
and will continue to do so in the future. 
While the university does not guarantee 
employment, the programs provided by the 
school, the quality of its faculty and the 
admirable performance of our past 
graduates in the industry have combined 
with the efforts of the university's placement 
office to produce a past record of an enviable 
90 to 95 percent graduate placement. 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to a program 
in this school must be a graduate of an 
approved secondary school or the 
equivalent. While no set program of high 
school subjects is prescribed, an applicant 
must meet the standard of the university 
with respect to the high school average. 
Applicants must present 15 acceptable units 
of satisfactory work, including nine or more 
units of college preparatory subjects. 
Satisfactory scores on College Entrance 



144 

Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude 
Tests (SAT) or American College Testing 
(ACT) program tests are required. 

The Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
university core curriculum. See page 19 for 
information. 

Transfer Credit 

The School of Hotel, Restaurant and 
Tourism Administration is interested in the 
further educational and professional 
development of students with transcripts 
from regionally accredited junior, senior and 
community colleges, plus professional 
schools such as the Culinary Institute of 
America and Manchester Community 
College. A transfer credit policy for students 
transferring from a properly accredited 
school has been developed and will be 
furnished upon request. Special provisions 
have also been developed for applicants 
holding the baccalaureate degree in some 
other discipline. 



Department of Hotel 
and Restaurant 
Management 

Chairman: Mark M. Warner, M.A. 

Professor: James F. Downey, Ph.D., Purdue 

University 
Assistant Professors: Beverly Bentivegna, 

R.D., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 

University; Mark M. Warner, M.A., State 

University of New York 

The food service industry has expanded 
rapidly in the past half century. A 
conservative estimate is that one out of every 
three meals is planned, prepared and served 
outside the family home. The food service 
industry is broad in scope and varies from 
systems such as highly competitive and 
expensive restaurants and hotels to a 
multiplicity of fast and less costly food 



outlets such as schools, universities and 
hospitals with conservative budgets. 

Hotel management offers outstanding 
personal and financial rewards. The 
diversified knowledge required in the 
management and operation of the modern 
hotel or motel demands a broad and varied 
professional background. The program in 
hotel management is designed to assist the 
student in his or her preparation for a 
rewarding career in this demanding 
profession. 

B.S., Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 

A student earning a bachelor of science 
degree in hotel and restaurant management 
is able to focus on the development of those 
managerial skills, abilities, and compe- 
tencies essential to all professional 
managers, with specific concentration on 
those characteristics needed for managing 
hotels, restaurants and related operations. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in hotel and 
restaurant management must complete 121 
credit hours, including the university core 
curriculum, electives and those courses 
listed below: 

HR 202A^olume Food Purchasing 
HR 304A^olume Food Production and 

Service II 
HR 326/Hospitality Human Resources 
HR 330/Hospitality Property Management 
HR 404/Volume Food Production and 

Service III 
HR 410/Hotel and Restaurant Operations 
HR 411/Hospitality Layout and Design 
HR 412/Hospitality Law 
HR 425 /Hospitality Accounting Systems 
HR 426/Front Office and Management 

Information Systems 
HR 512/Senior Seminar 
DI 200/Volume Food Production and 

Service I 
DI 214/Food Service Management Systems I 
DI 216/Food Service Management Systems II 
DI 218/Food Service Management 

Systems III 



Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 145 



TT 165/Introduction to Tourism and 
Hospitality 

A 101 /Introduction to Financial Accounting 
A 102/Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 
LA 101 /Business Law 
MK 105/Principles of Marketing 
MK 205 /Consumer Behavior or 

MK 307/Advertising and Promotion 
MG 125/Management and Organization 
MG 231 /Management of Human Resources 
IB 312/International Business 
CO 100/Human Communication 
PS 241 /International Relations 

Practicum 

In addition to the required courses listed 
above, a working practicum of 1000 hours 
for the B.S. degree and 500 hours for the 
A.S. degree is also a requirement for 
graduation. 

A.S., Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 

A student may obtain an associate degree 
in hotel and restaurant management, then 
continue at the University of New Haven 
and receive the B.S. in hotel and restaurant 
management. 

Required courses 

Students earning the A.S. in hotel and 
restaurant management must complete 60 
credit hours, including certain core courses 
and those courses listed below: 

HR 202/Volume Food Purchasing 
HR 304/VoIume Food Production and 

Service II 
HR 326/HospitaIity Human Resources 
DI 200/Volume Food Production and 

Service I 
DI 214/Food Service Management Systems I 
DI 216/Food Service Management Systems II 
TT 165/Introduction to Tourism and 

Hospitality 
A 101 /Introduction to Financial Accounting 
A 102/Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 



MK 105/Principles of Marketing 

MG 125/Management and Organization 

MG 231 /Management of Human Resources 

Minor Programs 

A total of 18 semester hours of course 
work must be earned in order for a student 
to declare the field of hotel and restaurant 
management as a minor area of study. The 
course work, 18 credits, is identical to the 
requirements of the certificate. 

Hotel and Restaurant 
Management Certificate 

The department offers a certificate in hotel 
and restaurant management. This certificate 
is designed for those professionals currently 
employed in hotels, motels, resorts, clubs 
and areas of food service, excluding 
institutional, who wish to increase their 
knowledge and skills leading to a 
supervisory position in this growing field. 
Students must complete 18 credit hours of 
required courses to earn a certificate and 
may choose to take these courses on a credit 
or non-credit basis. For those students who 
take the non-credit option, it is not necessary 
to apply for admission to the university. 
However, if you are admitted, the credits 
earned may be applied toward the 
requirements for a degree program. 

All students are required to take 18 credit 
hours, including the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

HR 326/HospitaUty Human Resources 
HR 404/Volume Food Production and 

Service III 
HR 410/Hotel and Restaurant Operations 
HR 411 /Hospitality Layout and Design 
HR 41 2/ Hospitality Law 
HR 425/Hospitality Accounting Systems 



146 



Department of 
Tourism and Travel 
Administration 



The American Airlines automation system, 
SABRE, which means Semi-Automated 
Business Retrieval Environment, is directly 
on-line with the airlines' central reservation 
system in Tulsa, Oklahoma, enhancing 
students' education in the field. 



Chairman: Elisabeth van Dyke, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor: Elisabeth van Dyke, 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Tourism and travel activities are major 
national resources for many nations. Travel 
patterns affect the construction of facilities, 
and most countries and states have major 
programs to expand tourism within their 
boundaries. Tourism contributes to so many 
different economic areas that expenditures 
related to world tourism and travel are 
expected to approach $900 billion before the 
end of the century. These figures emphasize 
the need for expert professional counselors 
and consultants in tourism and travel. By the 
end of 1991, the tourism industry will be the 
largest private employer in the United 
States. By the end of the century, it will be 
the largest in the world. 

Tourism and travel professionals impact 
on commercial activities ranging from 
transportation, accommodations and food, 
to touring, sightseeing, shopping and 
cultural events. The tourism and travel 
major studies the history, routes, 
equipment, services and developments in 
the areas of tourism and travel, as well as 
the cultural, economic, and political 
implications of tourism-related activities. 

The department of tourism and travel is 
an allied member of the American Society of 
Travel Agents (ASTA), and actively 
participates in the society's events. 

Through membership in the Society of 
Tourism Educators, the Pacific Area Travel 
Association, and the National Tour 
Organization, the department is in constant 
contact with the tourism industry. The 
department chairman is also a member of 
the board of directors of the Society of Travel 
and Tourism Educators. 

The Department of Tourism and Travel 
has installed an airline computer laboratory. 



B.S., Tourism and Travel 
Administration 

A student earning a bachelor of science 
degree in tourism and travel administration 
studies international business, economics, 
international relations and the social and 
cultural patterns that have shaped the 
development of the tourism and travel 
industry. Students receive field experience 
opportunities at travel agencies, airlines, 
tour operators, cruise lines and convention 
bureaus throughout New England. 

Students enrolled in the tourism and 
travel administration major are encouraged 
to choose a minor in political science, 
psychology, sociology or international 
business. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in tourism and 
travel administration must complete 121 
credit hours, including the university core 
curriculum, business electives and those 
courses listed below: 

TT 165/Introduction to Tourism and 

Hospitality 
TT 166/Touristic Geography 
TT 267/Shipping and Cruises 
TT 270 /Computerized Airline Reservations 

and Ticketing 
TT 280 /Group Travel 
TT 375 /Travel Agency Management 
TT 430 /Professional Meeting Plaimer 

Management 
TT 440/ Tourism Planmng and Development 
TT 450/U.S. Tourism Development and 

Investment 
TT 512/Seminar in Tourism and Travel 
CO 100 /Human Communications 
A 101 /Introduction to Financial 

Accounting 
IB 312/International Business 



Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 147 



A 102 /Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 
LA 101 /Business Law I 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 1 
MK 105 /Principles of Marketing 
MG 125 /Management and Organization 
MG 231/Management of Human Resources 
E 220/Creative Writing 
PS 241/International Relations 
PS 243/lnternational Law and Organization 
PS 355/Terrorism and Tourism 

Plus two foreign language electives, two 
tourism and travel administration 
electives, four electives and a practicum 
of 1000 hours. 

A.S., Tourism and Travel 
Administration 

A student may obtain an associate degree 
in tourism and travel administration, then 
continue at the University of New Haven 
and earn a bachelor of science degree in the 
field. 

Required Courses 

The tourism and travel administration 
major must complete 60 credit hours, 
including the courses listed below: 

TT 165/Introduction to Tourism and 

Hospitality 
TT 166/Touristic Geography 
TT 267/Shipping and Cruises 
TT 270/Computerized Airline Reservations 

and Ticketing 
TT 375/Travel Agency Management 
CO 100/Human Communication 
E 105/Composition 
E 110/Composition and Literature 
HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 
M 127/Finite Mathematics 
PS 241/International Relations 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 1 
MG 125 /Management and Organization 
MK 105 /Principles of Marketing 



Minor Program 

A total of 18 semester hours of course 
work must be earned in order for a student 
to declare the field of tourism and travel 
administration as a minor area of study. The 
course work, 18 credits, is identical to the 
certificate requirements. 

Tourism and Travel 
Administration Certificate 

Designed for those currently employed, 
or planning to be employed, in the tourism 
and travel industries, the program will 
prepare the individual for entry level 
positions at travel agencies, tour operators, 
airline and land transportation installations 
and other tourism-related facilities. All 
students pursuing a certificate in tourism 
and travel administration are required to 
complete 18 credit hours. The courses are 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

TT 165/Introduction to Tourism and 

Hospitality 
TT/166 Touristic Geography 
TT 267/Shipping and Cruises 
TT 270/Computerized Airline Reservations 

and Ticketing 
TT 280 /Group Travel 
TT 375 Travel Agency Management 



Plus one Tourism and Travel 

Administration restricted elective and a 
practicum of 500 hours. 



149 



SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL 
STUDIES AND 
CONTINUING 
EDUCATION 



Ralf E. Carriuolo, Ph.D., dean 
Dany J. Washington, Ph.D., 
associate dean 

The School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education provides educational 
services for three distinct types of students: 
those who wish to major in degree programs 
specifically oriented toward career paths in 
aviation, public safety and fire science, and 
industrial safety and hygiene; those adult 
students who wish to pursue undergraduate 
degree programs on a part-time basis, either 
days or evenings, and/or in the summer; 
those professionals seeking personal 
enrichment or professional development 
through special credit-free seminars, 
courses, or programs designed to meet the 
requirements of national and/or regional 
accreditations and licensures. 

To service these varied and important 
needs appropriately, the school is divided 
into four distinct divisions: the Department 
of Professional Studies, the Division of 
Continuing Education, UNH in South- 
eastern Connecticut and the Division of 
Corporate and Professional Development. 



Degrees 

Department of Professional Studies 

The Department of Professional Studies 
offers degree programs in these career areas: 
aviation science, fire science, occupational 
safety and health and professional studies, 
an individually created educational 
program. 

Bachelor of Science 

Air Transportation Management 

Arson Investigation 

Fire Science Administration 

Fire Science Technology 

Fire Protection Engineering* 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Administration 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology 
Professional Studies* 

Associate in Science 

Aviation Science 

Fire and Occupational Safety 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Administration 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology 
Professional Studies* 



*Currt'ntly under consideration for licensure by the 
Connecticut Department of Higher Education 



150 

Certificates 

Arson Investigation 

Fire Prevention 

Hazardous Materials 

Hospital and Health Care Fire Safety and 

Security 
Industrial Fire Protection 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Professional Pilot 

Master of Science 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Management 
Fire Science 

Professional Certificates 

Fire Science 
Industrial Hygiene 
Occupational Safety 

Senior Professional Certificate 

Occupational Safety and Health 
Management 

Division of Continuing Education 

A wide variety of undergraduate courses 
and complete degree programs are offered 
in evening sessions during the fall and 
spring semesters, as well as during an 
extensive summer term and intersession. All 
offerings are credit-bearing courses and lead 
to bachelor and associate degrees in all the 
academic schools throughout the university. 
Courses are identical to those offered during 
the daytime hours and are staffed by the 
academic departments with the same full 
and part-time scholars who teach in the Day 
Division. Degrees conferred by the 
university do not distinguish between 
programs completed during the daytime or 
evening hours. 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 

The University of New Haven currently 
operates learning centers throughout 
Connecticut serving the general public. The 
largest of these, UNH in Southeastern 
Connecticut, is located in the Groton area 
and enrolls more than 2500 part-time adult 
students in many fully-supported 
undergraduate programs. Students are 
encouraged to investigate the trimester 
offerings of all the learning centers, availing 
themselves of a vast array of course offerings 
in a variety of time schedules. 



The Division of Corporate and 

Professional Development 

All seminars and courses for professional 
certification and development are offered 
through the Division of Corporate and 
Professional Development. Annual 
symposia for occupational safety and health 
professionals, professionals in the 
hospitality industries and other specific 
employment groups are hosted at the 
university through this division. Courses in 
management, real estate, engineering 
certification preparation, pilot refresher, 
financial planning, personal and main-frame 
computer applications, employee benefits, 
and other professional training are 
scheduled on a yearly basis at several 
locations throughout Connecticut. 

Recent custom-tailored seminars and 
training programs developed for specific 
companies have included such diverse 
topics as fiber optics, technical and business 
writing, supervision and management, 
converting a machine shop to metric units, 
computer basics for top-level management, 
customer service development and many 
others. 

Based on the current nationally 
recognized standards, continuing education 
units (CEUs), are awarded for professional 
development courses. 



Department of 
Professional Studies 

Chairman: Brad T. Garber, Ph.D. 

Professors: Brad T. Garber, Ph.D., 
University of California at Berkeley; 
Frederick Mercilliott, Ph.D., City 
University of New York 

Associate Professor: Dany J. Washington, 
Ph.D., Southeastern University 

Assistant Professors: David P. Hunter, 
M.P.A., University of New Haven; 
Richard L. Penn, Jr., M.A., Central 
Michigan University; Robert G. Sawyer, 
M.S., University of New Haven 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 151 



Practitioners-in-Residence: Hamdi M. 
Balba, Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley; William S. Johnson, B.S., 
Southern Connecticut State College; 
Leonard A. Krause, D.Sc, University of 
Cincinnati; Jack K. McElfish, M.P.A., 
University of New Haven; Edward L. 
Tapley, M.S., University of New Haven 

The Department of Professional Studies 
offers several degree programs for students 
interested in specific employment-related 
areas and for those who wish to create their 
own unique structured course of study. 

Degree programs offered in professional 
studies are: aviation science (technology and 
management), fire science (technology, 
investigation and administration), and 
occupational safety and health 
(administration and technology). 

The department also coordinates the A.S. 
and B.S. in professional studies, a program 
of specialized curriculum designed for the 
individual student who seeks an education 
drawn from a number of areas and 
disciplines. 



Aviation 



Program Director: David P. Hunter, M.P.A. 

Flight Operations Director: Richard L. 
Penn, M.A. 

The aviation industry, both commercial 
and general, is dynamic, employing 1.5 
million people as flight and service 
personnel and in manufacturing. As the 
industry continues to expand there will be a 
need for additional personnel with technical 
skills. 

The aviation program prepares students 
to meet the demands of the future and the 
career goals of the individual. 

The associate in science degree in aviation 
science provides students with a two-year 
degree program which consists of the 
technical aviation background required for 
employment as pilots. Additionally, a 
concentration of courses from the Schools of 
Engineering, Business, or Arts and Sciences 
is required. Following completion of the 



associate's degree, students may continue 
for a bachelor's degree in air transportation 
management or in a program designed to 
meet their individual career objectives. 

The bachelor of science degree in air 
transportation management provides 
students selecting the flight option with the 
technical aviation background required of 
professional pilots. A strong foundation of 
management and specific aviation 
management courses providing knowledge 
and skills required of pilots and executives 
in the aviation industry is an integral part of 
this program. 

Students majoring in other programs at 
the university may select any of the aviation 
courses as electives. 

The department provides a complete 
flight training program leading to specific 
licenses and ratings, as well as training in 
acrobatic flight. Flight training at UNH is a 
fully integrated, rigorous and structured 
program. Ground school is provided in the 
university's classrooms. The department 
maintains an office and resource center at 
Tweed/New Haven Airport, where student 
pilot training is continued with a complete 
video system, flight simulation devices, and 
flight lessons on university-owned aircraft 
by university staff instructors. 

Students in the primary phase of flight 
training will be given approximately 40 
hours flying in a Piper Tomahawk, including 
up to 30 hours of dual instruction. Students 
in advanced phases will receive most of their 
training in a complex aircraft — the fully 
instrumented Piper Arrow. The total flying 
time for six blocks of training will be in 
excess of 200 hours. A special tuition fee, in 
addition to the university's regular tuition, 
covers all costs for the program. Completion 
of the flight training program should qualify 
students for a commercial pilot's license 
with instrument rating. Some students may 
elect to earn a Certified Flight Instructor's 
Certificate. 

Aviation Association 

The Aviation Association is the campus 
student activities club. The association 
organizes trips, airmects and FAA seminars 
throughout the school year. 



152 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

The Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
university core curriculum. See page 19 for 
information. 

B.S., Air Transportation 
Management 

Students earning the B.S. in air 
transportation management must complete 
121 credit hours or 131 hours if the flight 
option is chosen. (Flight option courses are 
marked "¥.") These courses must include 
the university core curriculum and the 
courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

AE 100/Aviation Science — Private 

AE 105F/ Primary Flight— Solo* 

AE 110/ Aviation Meteorology 

AE 115F/ Private Pilot Flight* 

AE 130/Aviation Science — Commercial 

AE 135F/ Instrument Flight T 

AE 140 /Concepts of Aerodynamics 

AE 145F/ Instrument Right IP 

AE 200/ Aviation Science — Instrument 

AE 205F/Commercial Flight* 

AE 210/Gas Turbine Powerplants 

AE 230/Flight Instructor Seminar 

AE 235F/ Instructor Flight or 

AE 245F/Multi-Engine Rating* 
AE 400/Airport Management 
AE 410/Corporate Aviation Management 
AE 420/Airline Management 
AE 430/Aviation Safety Seminar 
AE 440/ Aviation Law 

A 101/Introduction to Financial Accounting 
FI 113/Business Finance 
PH 100/Introductory Physics with 

Laboratory 



A.S., Aviation Science 

A total of 70 semester hours of credit is 
required for the associate in science degree 
in aviation science. The program is designed 
to be completed in two years. 

Required Courses 

In addition to the aviation courses listed 
below, students should select an area of 
concentration of courses in consultation 
with the director of aviation programs, from 
a program within another school of the 
university. This concentration will prepare 
students for the continuation of their 
education toward a bachelor's degree to 
meet their individual needs and career 
objectives. 

AE 100/Aviation Science — Private 

AE 105F/Primary Flight— Solo* 

AE 110/ Aviation Meteorology 

AE 115F/ Private Pilot Flight* 

AE 130/Aviation Science — Commercial 

AE 135F/ Instrument Flight I* 

AE 140 /Concepts of Aerodynamics 

AE 145F/ Instrument Flight II* 

AE 200/Aviation Science — Instrument 

AE 205F/Commercial Flight* 

AE 210/Gas Turbine Powerplants 

AE 230/Flight Instructor Seminar 

AE 235F/ Instructor Flight or 

AE 245F/Multi-Engine Rating* 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 

Plus one history elective, 
two math or science courses 

*Flight training courses. 

Professional Pilot Certificate 

The aviation department offers a 
professional pilot certificate. Students must 
complete between 28 and 31 credit hours to 
earn a certificate. Students may choose to 
take these courses for credit or non-credit. 
For those students who take the non-credit 
option, it is not necessary to apply for 
admission to the university. However, 
students who are admitted may apply the 
credits earned toward the requirements for 
a degree program. 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 153 



Required Courses 

All students are required to take a 
minimum of 28 credit hours (or 31 credit 
hours if AE 235 is taken). The courses are 
listed below: 

AE 100/ Aviation Science — Private 
AE 105F/ Primary Flight— Solo* 
AE 110/Aviation Meteorology 
AE 115F/Private Pilot Flight* 
AE 130 /Aviation Science — Commercial 
AE 135F/ Instrument Flight I* 
AE 140/Concepts of Aerodynamics 
AE 145F/ Instrument Flight 11* 
AE 200/Aviation Science — Instrument 
AE 205F/Commercial Flight* 
AE 210/Gas Turbine Powerplants 
AE 235F/ Instructor Flight or 
AE 245F/Multi-Engine Rating* 



trips, programs, and activities related to the 
fire science field throughout the school year. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine their 
education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" in the 
Student Life section or consult the Co-op 
office. 

The Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
university core curriculum. See the 
university core curriculum section of this 
catalog for information. 



*Fli^ht training courses. 

Fire Science 

Director: Robert G. Sawyer, M.S. 

The United States continues to be among 
the world leaders in the appalling 
destruction of life and property from fire. 
The arson problem continues to contribute 
to these statistics at an alarming rate. 

This loss of life and property has triggered 
a rapidly growing need for trained 
professionals in the fire science field as 
administrators, investigators and fire 
protection technicians and engineers. To 
meet this need, the University of New 
Haven offers five undergraduate degrees 
and five certificates that provide curricula 
designed for those entering this exciting 
field. 

For those students completing their 
bachelor's degrees, the university is now 
offering a graduate professional certificate in 
fire protection and a master's degree in fire 
science with an administrative or technology 
concentration. 

Fire Science Club 

The Fire Science Club is the campus 
student activities club. The club organizes 



B.S., Arson Investigation — 
Minor in Criminal Justice 

An arson investigator must be 
knowledgeable in the fundamentals of the 
physical sciences, social sciences and fire 
science. He or she must also be familiar with 
the criminal justice system. Students 
majoring in arson investigation will be 
required to complete 15 to 21 credits in 
criminal justice, qualifying them for a minor 
in criminal justice. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in arson 
investigation must complete 126 credit 
hours including the university core 
curriculum and those courses listed below: 

FS 106/Fire Strategy and Tactics 

FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 301/Building Construction Codes and 

Standards 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
FS 306/Fire and Casualty Insurance 
FS 402/Arson Investigation I 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control 
FS 405/Fireground Management 



154 



FS 406/Arson Investigation II 

FS 407/Arson Investigation II Laboratory 

FS 498-499/Research Project or 

FS 599/Independent Study 
A 101/Introduction to Financial Accounting 
CH 103/Introduction to General Chemistry 
CH 104/lntroduction to General Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CJ 102/Crim'inal Law or FS 408/Fire 

Protection Law 
C] 201/Principles of Criminal Investigation 
CJ 215/Introduction to Forensic Science or 

FS 501/Internship 
CJ 217/Criminal Procedure I 
CJ 218/Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 
CJ 231/Juvenile Delinquency 
CJ 311/Criminology 
IE 223/Personnel Administration or MG 125/ 

Management and Organization 
M 127/Finite Math 
M 228/Elementary Statistics 
P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 
P 336/ Abnormal Psychology 
PA 101/Introduction to Public 

Administration or FS 105/Municipal Fire 

Administration 
SO 113/Sociology 

Plus electives chosen with adviser 

B.S., Fire Protection 
Engineering 

The role of a fire protection engineer is to 
safeguard life and property from the 
devastating effects of fire and explosions. 
Through a combination of engineering and 
fire science courses, students learn how to 
design, construct and deploy fire protection 
systems which prevent and/or minimize 
potential losses from fire, water, smoke or 
explosion. 

Graduates of the fire protection 
engineering program will be qualified to 
design, engineer or research systems 
responsible for the reduction of fire losses. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in fire 
protection engineering must complete 133 
credit hours, including the university core 
curriculum and the courses listed: 



FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 301/Building Construction Codes and 

Standards 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 303L/Fire Protection Hydraulic Design 

Laboratory 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
FS 304L/Fire Alarm /Detection Circuits 

Laboratory 
FS 306/Fire and Casualty Insurance 
FS 308/Industrial Fire Protection I 
FS 309/Industrial Fire Protection II 
FS 325/Fire/Life Safety Codes 
FS 350/Fire Hazards Analysis 
FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control 
FS 425/Fire Protection Plan Review 
FS 450/Fire Protection Heat Transfer 
CE 201/Statics 
CE 306/Hydraulics 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 117/General Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH 118/General Chemistry II Laboratory 
CS 102/Introduction to Programming — 

FORTRAN 
E 105/Composition 
E 110/Composition and Literature 
ES 107/Introduction to Engineering 
HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 
IE 204/Engineering Economics 
M 117/Calculus I 
M 118/Calculus II 
M 203/Calculus III 
M 204/Differential Equations 
ME 204/Dynamics 
ME 301/Thermodynamics 
MT 200/Engineering Materials 
P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 
PH 150/Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205/Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
SO 113/Sociology 
Scientific methodology elective; choice of 

literature or philosophy; choice of art/ 

music /theatre 
Plus electives chosen with the adviser 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 155 



B.S., Fire Science 
Administration 

The fire science administration program 
was developed for students wishing to enter 
or progress in the fire service. Studies 
include management techniques, fire 
prevention and suppression, and hazards 
control, along with the technical subjects 
required to prepare the future leaders in this 
highly technical field. A balance of theory 
and practical solutions is achieved through 
the course requirements and teaching 
practices. Graduates in this major will be 
ready to lead the fire service into the 
challenging future. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in fire science 
administration must complete 128 or 131 
credit hours, including the university core 
curriculum and those courses listed below: 

FS 105/Municipal Fire Administration 

FS 106/Fire Strategy and Tactics 

FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 301/Building Construction Codes and 

Standards 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
FS 306/Fire and Casualty Insurance 
FS 308/Industrial Fire Protection I 
FS 309/Industrial Fire Protection II 
FS 402/Arson Investigation I 
FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control 
FS 405/Fireground Management 
FS 406/Arson Investigation II 
FS 408/Fire Protection Law or SH 400/ 

Occupational Safety and Health Legal 

Standards 
A 101/Introduction to Financial Accounting 
BI 121/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I 
CH 103/Introduction to General Chemistry 
CH 104/Introduction to General Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CJ 105/Introduction to Security 
CS 107/Introduction to Data Processing 
EC 133/Principles of Economics 



M 127/Finite Math 

M 228/Elementary Statistics 

P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 

PA 408/Collective Bargaining 

SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 110/ Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
SO 113/Sociology 

Plus electives chosen with adviser 

B.S., Fire Science Technology 

This program focuses on the technological 
aspects of fire science, stressing fire control 
and suppression by fixed protection systems 
and construction methods. Many of the 
courses cover various engineering fields 
adapted to the problems that will confront 
the fire technologist. The essentials of fire 
chemistry; statics; the way in which 
materials behave under various conditions 
of stress including heat, process and 
transportation hazards and the design of 
structures for the maximum protection of 
the worker and the public are essential areas 
of study. 

Courses in fire prevention and control 
play a role equal to that of fire suppression. 
These include an investigation of fire 
suppression fluids and systems, fire 
detection and various automatic 
suppression systems. Students who 
complete this program are planners, 
designers of fire prevention systems and 
evaluators of facilities and equipment. 

Required Courses 

Students majoring in fire science 
technology are required to complete 129 or 
130 credit hours including the university 
core curriculum and those courses listed 
below: 

FS 105/Municipal Fire Administration 
FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 301/Building Construction Codes and 

Standards 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 



156 



FS 306/Fire and Casualty Insurance 

FS 308/Industrial Fire Protection I 

FS 309/Industrial Fire Protection II 

FS 402/Arson Investigation I 

FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 

FS 404/Special Hazards Control 

FS 405/Fireground Management 

FS 406-407/Arson Investigation II with 

Laboratory 
CE 201/Statics 

CE 302/BuiIding Construction 
CE 306/Hydraulics 
CH 115/General Chemistry I 
CH 117/General Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 116/General Chemistry II 
CH llS/General Chemistry II Laboratory 
CS 107/Introduction to Data Processing 
M 115/Precalculus Math 
M117/Calculusl 
M 118/Calculus II 

MG 125/Management and Organization 
MT 200/Engineering Materials 
P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 
PH 103/General Physics I 
PH 105/General Physics I Laboratory 
PH 104/General Physics II 
PH 106/General Physics II Laboratory 
SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
SO 113/Sociology 
Plus electives chosen with adviser 

A.S., Fire and Occupational 
Safety 

The two-year associate in science degree 
offers students a well-rounded program in 
both the fields of occupational safety and fire 
science. 

Many students continue for their 
bachelor's degrees in the fire science field 
and/or become valuable members of 
municipal fire departments and safety 
investigation teams. The program is 
specifically designed for the individual who 
wishes to enter the industrial field in safety 
and fire protection. 



Required Courses 

To complete the associate in science 
degree in fire and occupational safety, 65 or 
66 credit hours are required including those 
listed below: 

FS 105/Municipal Fire Administration 

FS 106/Fire Strategy and Tactics 

FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 308/Industrial Fire Protection I 
FS 309/Industrial Fire Protection II 
CH 103/Introduction to General Chemistry 
CH 104/Introduction to General Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CJ 105/Introduction to Security 
HS 101/Foundations of the Western World 
IE 223/Personnel Administration or MG 125/ 

Management and Organization 
M 127/Finite Math 
M 228/Elementary Statistics 
P Ill/Introduction to Psychology 
SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 110/ Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
SO 113/Sociology 
Plus humanities and science elective, core 

curriculum requirements and others 

chosen with adviser 

Minor in Fire Science 

Students wishing to minor in fire science 
should contact the director of their program. 
A minimum of 18 credit hours is required. 
The courses listed below are required unless 
a substitution is approved by the director of 
fire science. 

Required Courses 

FS 105/Municipal Fire Administration 

FS 106/Fire Strategy and Tactics 

FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 202/Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 157 



Fire Science Certificates 

Coordinator: Robert G. Sawyer, M.S. 

The fire science department offers 
certificates in arson investigation and 
various fire science specialties. Students 
must complete between 21 and 30 credit 
hours, depending on the program, to earn a 
certificate. Students may apply the credits 
earned, if they wish, toward the 
requirements for a bachelor's degree in fire 
science. 

Arson Investigation Certificate 

This certificate is designed to provide 
those in either the public or private sector 
with the scientific and legal knowledge 
needed to analyze situations for the 
possibility of arson. All students are 
required to complete 28 credit hours, 
including the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CJ 102/Criminal Law 

CJ 201/Criminal Investigation 

CJ 215/Introduction to Forensic Science or 

FS 501/Internship 
FS 105/Municipal Fire Administration* 
FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
FS 402/Arson Investigation I 
FS 406/ Arson Investigation II 

*Crminal justice majors may substitute PA 101 Introduction 
to Public Administration; transfer students may substitute 
police administration. 

Fire Prevention Certificate 

This certificate is designed to provide the 
essentials of fire science theory, fire 
detection and control techniques, and the 
administrative/legal aspects of fire 
protection. The program is applicable to the 
needs of both the private and public sectors 
of the fire protection profession. All 
students are required to complete 21 credit 
hours, including the courses listed: 



Required Courses 

FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 301/Building Construction Codes and 

Standards 
FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control 

A security course (CJ) or safety course (SH) 
may be substituted for FS 301, FS 304, or 
FS403 

Industrial Fire Protection 
Certificate 

This certificate provides the student with 
the basic essentials of fire science theory and 
safety procedures necessary for a position in 
the private sector. All students must 
complete 30 credits including six elective 
credits for this certificate. 

Required Courses 

FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 303/Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 

FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 

FS 308/Industrial Fire Protection I 

FS 309/Industrial Fire Protection II 

FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 

FS 404/Special Hazards Control 

FS 408/Fire Protection Law or SH 400/ 

Occupational Safety and Health Legal 

Standards 

Plus electives approved by the department 
chairman 

Hazardous Materials 
Certificate 

This certificate was designed to familiarize 
those who work with hazardous materials, 
and those interested in the fire and safety 
aspects of occupational and industrial health 
with the hazards, proper handling 
procedures and storage of these materials. 
Students will also learn the proper 
procedures to take if or when an accident or 
fire does occur. Students must take 19 credit 
hours, plus a Hazardous Materials Spill and 
Leak Control Workshop. 



158 



Required Courses 

FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
FS 302/Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 
FS 308/Industriai Fire Protection I 
FS 403/Process and Transportation Hazards 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control 
PH 130/Radiation Safety 

Hospital and Health Care Fire 
Safety and Security Certificate 

This certificate is specifically designed for 
the fire, safety, or security professional, 
working in a health care facility. The courses 
in this program are intended to inform 
students of potential fire problems, and to 
prepare them for the best methods of 
providing patient protection. All students 
are required to complete 15 credit hours, 
including the courses listed below. 

Required Courses 

FS 207/Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 308/lndustrial Fire Protection I 
FS 309/lndustrial Fire Protection II 
FS 404/Special Hazards Control or 
FS 500/Selected Topics: Hospital and 
Health Care Fire Science and Security 
FS 503/Patient Evacuation and Protection 



Occupational Safety 
and Health 

Director: Brad T. Garber, Ph.D. 

In recent years, the global community has 
become painfully aware of the importance of 
safety procedures and precautions in our 
everyday survival: the accidental release of 
lethal gases in India and the United States; 
the shuttle Challenger disaster; the cyanide 
deaths from altered Tylenol capsules, to 
mention only a few cases. Clearly, safety 
decision-making has been brought to the 
forefront of corporation management. No 
employer today can afford to relegate safety 
to a minor role in the organizational 
hierarchy. 



This great interest in safety issues has 
generated a growing demand for 
professional practitioners in the field. 
Industry, retailing, commerce, 
communications, construction and labor 
unions, as well as local, state and federal 
governments, need competent safety 
specialists. 

The demands placed upon the safety 
professional require a broad background in 
chemistry, physics, engineering, 
psychology and biology; this inter- 
disciplinary program draws upon the 
resources of the entire university. In 
addition to required courses, students 
choose from among a diversified offering of 
restricted and free electives with a balance of 
courses designed to meet the needs and 
interests of individual students. 

In addition to the four-year bachelor of 
science programs in occupational safety and 
health administration and technology, the 
university also offers two-year associate 
degree programs and an occupational safety 
and health certificate. At the graduate level, 
a complete program is offered which 
includes a master of science in occupational 
safety and health management as well as 
two professional certificates and a senior 
professional certificate. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the 
cooperative education program (Co-op) 
which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in their 
career field with college education. For 
further details see "The Co-op Program" in 
the Student Life section or consult the Co- 
op office. 

B.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 

A second group of degrees is offered in 
the field of occupational safety and health 
administration. These programs put less 
emphasis on the technical areas, but 
broaden the scope of the program into the 
areas of management and decision-making 
required to give students the broad-based 
outlook necessary to direct safety functions. 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 159 



In addition to the requirements for the 
A.S. degree below, bachelor's candidates 
must also complete the university core 
curriculum and the following courses, for a 
combined total of 123 credit hours: 

Required Courses 

BI 121/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I 
BI 122/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory II 
E 230/Public Speaking 
FS 208/Instructor Methodology 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
IE 223/Personnel Management 
PH 130/Radiation Safety 
SH 201/Evaluation of the Occupational 

Environment 
SH 308/Industrial Fire Prevention I 
SH 309/Industrial Fire Prevention II 
SH 400/Occupational Safety and Health 

Legal Standards 

Plus 12 additional credit hours of restricted 
electives and 6 credit hours of unrestricted 
electives 

B.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Technology 

Both associate and bachelor's degrees are 
offered in the field of occupational safety 
and health technology. These degree 
programs provide strong technical 
preparation with courses in calculus, 
chemistry, physics, biology and other 
disciplines related to the evaluation and 
resolution of complex safety problems. 

In addition to the requirements for the 
A.S. degree below, bachelor's candidates 
also must complete the university core 
curriculum and the following courses. The 
complete B.S. program totals 131 credit 
hours: 

Required Courses 

BI 121/GeneraI and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I 
BI 122/General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory II 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 
IE 303/Cost Control 



IE 348/Manufacturing Processes 

M117/Calculusl 

M 118/CalculusII 

PH 130/Radiation Safety 

SH 201/Evaluation of the Occupational 

Environment 
SH 308/Industrial Fire Prevention I 
SH 309/Industrial Fire Prevention II 
SH 400/Occupational Safety and Health 

Legal Standards 
SO 113/Sociology 

Plus 12 credit hours of restricted electives 



A.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 

Students earning the A.S. in occupational 
safety and health administration must 
complete 64 credit hours including the 
courses listed below: 

Core Courses 

CH 103/Introduction to General Chemistry 
CH 104/Introduction to General Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CS 107/Introduction to Data Processing - 

BASIC 
E 105/English Composition 
E no/English Composition and Literature 
E 220/Writing for Business and Industry 
FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
M 127/Finite Mathematics 
P Ill/Psychology 
SO 113/Sociology 
Literature or philosophy requirement 

Plus 3 credit hours of restricted electives and 
6 credit hours of unrestricted electives 

Required Courses 

CH 107/Elementary Organic Chemistry 
CH 108/Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory 
CJ 105/Introduction to Security 
FS 106/Fire Strategy and Tactics 
M 228/Elementary Statistics 
SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 110/ Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 



160 



A.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Technology 

Students earning the A.S. degree in 
occupational safety and health technology 
must complete 67 credit hours including the 
courses listed below: 

Core Courses 

CH 115/General Chemistry I 

CH 117/General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CS 107/Introduction to Data Processing - 

BASIC 
E 105/English Composition 
E 110/English Composition and Literature 
E 220/Writing for Business and Industry 
FS 201/Essentials of Fire Chemistry with 

Laboratory 
M 115/Pre-Calculus Mathematics 
P Ill/Psychology 

Required Courses 

CH n6/GeneraI Chemistry II 

CH 118/General Chemistry II Laboratory 

CJ 105/Introduction to Security 

IE 223/Personnel Administration 

M 228/Elementary Statistics 

PH 103/General Physics I 

PH 105/General Physics I Laboratory 

PH 104/General Physics II 

PH 106/General Physics II Laboratory 

SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 110/ Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

Plus 3 additional credit hours of restricted 
electives and 6 credit hours of unrestricted 
electives 

Occupational Safety and 
Health Certificate 

Director: Brad T. Garber, Ph.D. 

The department offers an occupational 
safety and health certificate for which 
students must complete 18 credit hours. 
This program of study covers the 
fundamentals of on-the-job safety and 
health as well as the requirements of OSHA 
regulations. These courses provide an 
introduction to dealing with problems 
typically confronted by safety professionals. 



Required Courses 

SH 100/Safety Organization and 

Management 
SH 110/ Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200/Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
SH 201/Evaluation of the Occupational 

Environment 
SH 400/OccupationaI Safety and Health 

Legal Standards 
FS 304/Fire Detection and Control 



Professional Studies* 



Coordinator: Dean's Office 

In today's workplace of ever-increasing 
specialization, business and industry 
oftentimes develop needs unmet by 
traditional undergraduate degree programs. 
Through careful planning, the creative 
student can develop a unique, 
individualized course of study leading to a 
degree in professional studies that provides 
for a broad-based education in a number of 
interlocking academic areas. Unlike the 
general studies programs, which are for 
students whose career goals are currently 
undefined, the professional studies 
programs are for students who know exactly 
what they want but cannot find it in 
traditional degree programs. 

Students interested in creating 
professional studies programs are urged to 
contact the chairman of the professional 
studies department who, in conjunction 
with the dean and a faculty advisory 
committee, will work with the student in the 
creation of an appropriate sequence of 
courses. 

*This program is currcntl}/ under consideration for licensure 
by the Connecticut State Board of Higher Education. 



B.S., Professional Studies 

For the goal-oriented student, the B.S. in 
professional studies provides the necessary 
flexibility to create an entire degree program 
to fit the student's specific educational 
needs. Drawing on courses from every 
academic area in the university and even 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 161 

creating new courses, the B.S. in Required Courses 

professional studies provides employment To earn an associate of science in 

possibilities in areas combining engineering, professional studies, students must com- 

busmess and manufacturing, and the plete 61 credit hours, including those listed 

humanistic, social and natural sciences. below: 

Designed by the student in cooperation n r i <-.. j- r- ■ i 

,.,;4.i, ^ \, ■ 1. f u A x-i- rrotessional Studies Curnculum 
with appropriate faculty and practitioners in ... j l .. j .x ir, 

.1 c- \a tiT d c 1 n i-u (designed by student) 10 courses 

the field, the B.S. curnculum allows the r^ r^ ^- r- • / 

^. . . r 11 i. i.u J c Upen Elective Curriculum 

student full access to the wide range of / j • j u ^ j .\ -, 

faculty expertise throughout the university. ^ n^f^^"^"^ by student) 3 courses 

ct J . . 1^ ..u • J t, 105/Composition 
Students must present their proposed cim/r- ..• j t -.^ 
^„ ^ J , c u X- ,. b 110/Composition and Literature 

^S^'^-Z;'^r:r!^^:\::^' " "S lO./FoJ'ndations of the Western World 

^ 1 1. i.u 1.U 1 r i^u • Quantitative skills course 

approval no later than the close of their ^ 

freshman year. Transfer students or those c • ^r- i u^ n e course 

currently enrolled at the university in other c • i ■ 

i^i-i-uDc- r- 1 Social science course 

programs must enter the B.S. in professional 

studies before completing 84 applicable 

credit hours. t-x • • • /• 

Division of 

Required Courses 

Students must complete 121 credit hours Contillllinff EdUCStiOIl 

including the core curriculum and those ^ 

courses listed below: 

Professional Studies Curriculum ^ pu'j.^^^'^^fu ' ^f "^ J. Washington, 

(designed by student) 15 courses ^^■^■' Southeastern University 

Minor Elective Curriculum The University of New Haven recognizes 

(designed by student) 7 courses that learning is a life-long process. The 

Open Elective Curriculum Division of Continuing Education was 

(designed by student) 7 courses established to service part-time, adult 

learners seeking to widen their academic 
horizons while pursuing a career. The 

A S Profpssional StudiPS division is dedicated to guiding these 

/\.0., 1 roiesbionai :DlUUies» students into programs that best suit their 

For students whose career oaths lead to strengths and career needs, 
areas not clearly defined by existing major All offerings are credit-bearing courses 

programs, the A.S. in professional studies and lead to bachelor and associate degrees 

provides a self-directed program of study in all the academic schools throughout the 

utilizing the resources of a variety of university. Courses are identical to those 

departments throughout the university. offered during the daytime hours and are 

Similar to the B.S. in professional studies, staffed by the academic departments with 

the A.S. degree allows students to create the same full and part-time scholars who 

their own courses or ones created teach in the Day Division. Degrees conferred 

specifically for their programs. In by the university do not distinguish between 

conjunction with a faculty member and the programs completed during the daytime or 

chairman of the professional studies evening hours. 

department, the A.S. program of study is All degree programs are offered through 

carefully reviewed and approved by an the Division of Continuing Education except 

Advisory Committee to ensure appropriate for applied mathematics-natural sciences, 

educational content. Courses in the A.S. English and music. Evening students must 

program are applicable to other programs at enroll in some day courses to receive a 

the bachelor's degree level. degree in these programs. 



162 



Most courses offered by the division, 
except for laboratory and certain four- 
semester-hour courses, meet in the early 
evening hours, one day per week. 

An evening student may carry as few as 
two or as many as 11 semester hours, 
concurrentlv. 

Admission Requirements 

Generally, graduates of accredited 
secondary schools or persons who have a 
state high school equivalency diploma are 
eligible for admission. 

Information regarding the examination for 
the state high school equivalency diploma 
may be obtained from the Continuing 
Education office or by writing to the Bureau 
of Youth Services, State Department of 
Education, State Office Building, Hartford, 
Connecticut 06103. 

In some cases, a person who has 
completed at least two years of secondary 
school with a satisfactory record may be 
considered for admission, provided he or 
she performs exceptionally well on the 
required placement examinations. The 
university is interested in evidence of 
maturity, motivation and formal education 
as prerequisites for admission. Such an 
admission will be tentative for one year, 
during which time the student must pass the 
examinations for the state high school 
equivalency diploma. A person who has not 
completed at least two years of secondary 
school will not be considered for admission. 

With the exception of auditors, students 
taking any course, whether for a degree or 
not, must meet admission requirements. 

Applicants are required to take placement 
tests including mechanics of English and 
reading comprehension and a mathematics 
examination. Scholastic Aptitude Tests are 
not required for admission, but if they are 
taken and a satisfactory score obtained, they 
may be accepted in place of University of 
New Haven placement tests. Applicants 
who have completed 30 or more credit hours 
of work with a "C" average or better from an 
approved, regionally accredited college or 
university may be exempt from taking 
placement tests depending upon the subject 
matter of the credit hour course work. 



Credit for Prior Learning 

The Division of Continuing Education 
recognizes that learning which has been 
acquired through many traditional and non- 
traditional approaches can be measured and 
validated by objective procedures acceptable 
to the faculty of UNH. This learning must 
appropriately parallel the curriculum of the 
university in order to be awarded UNH 
credit. 

Credit from the following sources and 
procedures may be used to earn credits at 
the university. 

Transfer Credits: Courses taken at a 
regionally accredited public or private 
college can be awarded UNH credit 
provided that the student receives a passing 
grade of "C" or better and the courses are 
equivalent to the university's curriculum. 

College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP): University credit may be earned for 
certain areas through both the general 
examinations and (in many cases) the 
subject examination of the College-Level 
Examination Program. 

Proficiency Examination Program (PEP): 

This program may also be used to earn 
credits in certain academic areas. For 
information write ACT PEP Coordinator, 
ACT Proficiency Examination Program, 
P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, lA 52240. 

Advanced Placement: University credit may 
be awarded to students who receive a grade 
of three or higher on the Advanced 
Placement Examinations of the College 
Board. Credit is awarded only in those areas 
applicable to the university's curriculum. 
For information contact College Board 
Advanced Placement Examination, P.O. 
Box 977, Princeton, NJ 08540. 

Dantes Subject Standardized Tests (DSST): 

This is a program administered by 
Educational Testing Services (ETS) in 
conjunction with DANTES. The 
examinations are available to all military 
personnel. For information contact the Base 
Education Services Officer. ETS has made 
these examinations available to civilians. 
Civilians should contact the Program 
Administrator, DSST, P.O. Box 56-D, 
Princeton, NJ 08540. 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 163 



Servicemembers Opportunity College 
(SOC): The University of New Haven is a 
member of the SOC Bachelor Degrees for 
Soldiers (BDFS) Network. This network is 
open to members of the armed services and 
their spouses. For information contact the 
School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education or the Base Education 
Service Officer. 

Credit by Examination: To apply for credit 
by examination, which is an in-house 
comprehensive final course examination, 
the student must submit a request to the 
School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education. The examinations 
requested will be prepared and 
administered after approval to take the 
examinations is given by the Vice Provost 
and the respective department. The score 
will be reported as a Pass or Fail. 

Modern Language Association Foreign 
Language Proficiency Tests (MLA): The 

MLA comprehensive tests are available in 
French, German, Italian, Russian and 
Spanish. Undergraduate students may take 
Battery A of the examination only. Battery A 
includes speaking, writing, reading and 
listening comprehension components. 

Military Service School Courses: The 

university may also accept as transfer credit 
certain courses completed during in-service 
training. Veterans should request that 
official transcripts of in-service training be 
sent to the School of Professional Studies 
and Continuing Education at the university. 

Army, Navy or Coast Guard veterans 
should write to: National Personnel Records 
Center, Military Personnel Records, 9700 
Page Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132. 

Marine Corps veterans should write to: 

Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps (Code 
DGK) Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, 
Washington, DC 20308. 

Air Force veterans should write to: 

Community College of the Air Force, 
Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery, AL 
36112. 

Enrollees on Active Duty in the U.S. 
Armed Forces should arrange for DD form 
295 "Application for the Evaluation of 



Educational Experiences During Military 
Service" to be completed and forwarded to 
the School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education from the duty station. 
Veterans of any period of active service 
should provide the university with a copy of 
DD form 214 or other notice of separation for 
each period of service. This may assist in 
identifying possible sources of academic 
credit. 

Credit for Life Experience: It is important to 
emphasize that credit is not given for life 
experience but for the learning which 
results. The university will consider credit 
for life experience only if the experiences 
have been assessed and awarded credit by 
an accredited private or public institution of 
higher learning. 

Such credit will be considered as transfer 
courses and will be subject to the rules and 
regulations of UNH. 

Admission Procedure 

Applicants who seek admission should 
call or write the Division of Continuing 
Education for specific details. All applicants 
are encouraged to arrange for a personal 
interview which may be scheduled during 
or after normal business hours at the 
convenience of the applicant. 

During the interview, the applicant will 
discuss and plan a program, and complete 
the necessary forms to request official copies 
of secondary school and college transcripts. 

Registration 

New students may register in person at 
the Continuing Education office or may mail 
or fax in their registration and application 
form. Currently enrolled students may 
register by mail or fax prior to the 
announced deadline. Students should 
register in the office prior to making any 
payments in the Bursar's office. Current 
students who complete the registration 
procedure will have a valid registration and 
can normally be assured a seat in a class. A 
separate registration is required for each 
academic term students wish to attend. 
Auditors follow the same procedure and pay 
the same tuition and fees as students 
enrolled for credit. 



164 



Payment of Tuition and Fees 

The student completes the registration 
procedure by paying tuition and fees. There 
is a penalty fee for delaying either process 
beyond the end of the registration period. 

Students are urged to plan their programs 
carefully before completing registration 
forms to avoid the need for changes. Once 
the registration period has ended, a change 
of registration fee is charged for each change 
made. The fee is payable when the form 
requesting the change is submitted. 

Alumni who audit courses pay a reduced 
tuition, but must be cleared through the 
Alumni Office before registering. 

Summer Sessions 

Day and evening undergraduate courses 
are offered during the summer in a series of 
sessions ranging from four to 11 weeks in 
length. The first session begins shortly after 
the close of the spring semester. Resident 
dormitory students may therefore continue 
their studies uninterrupted through the 
entire summer. 

The university welcomes visiting students 
from other colleges and universities who 
wish to transfer summer courses back to 
their institution. Dormitory facilities are 
available for full-time summer study. 
Credits earned at the University of New 
Haven are generally accepted by other 
schools, but students are urged to consult 
with their home institutions for any special 
requirements or procedures for credit 
transfer. 

University of New Haven students can 
attend one or more of the UNH summer 
sessions to lighten their study load during 
the regular academic year, to reduce the time 
required for a degree, to prepare for other 
courses, to make up courses or to take 
additional work beyond that required for a 
degree and still complete a program on 
schedule. 

A list of courses offered during the 
summer is available from the Division of 
Continuing Education. 



Winter Intersession 

A number of undergraduate courses are 
offered during the period between the fall 
and spring semesters. These courses blend 
both traditional and innovative methods of 
instruction, including team teaching, field 
trips, lectures, laboratory work and research 
projects. A list of courses offered during 
intersession will be available from the 
Division of Continuing Education before 
each session. A student may take only one 
course during the intersession period. 

Off-Campus Corporate 
Programs 

The Division of Continuing Education can 
provide credit courses, certificates or 
complete degree programs at off-campus 
company facilities. For many employees 
who participate in these programs, on-site 
instruction is a convenient and economical 
alternative in professional enrichment. All 
classes are staffed by UNH faculty members, 
many of whom are current practitioners in 
business and industry. The option provides 
for a more tailored approach in greater 
flexibility of scheduling and in choice of 
courses. Classes are available during 
working hours, on "shared" time or after 
hours. 

In addition to providing instruction at a 
company, the Division of Continuing 
Education can accommodate employee work 
schedules with the following services: on- 
site registration, academic counseling and 
administration of placement examinations. 
Also available is the Tuition Deferment 
Policy which enables employees to defer 
payment of tuition with a letter of 
authorization from the company. 
Information on this policy and other 
corporate services can be obtained through 
the Division of Continuing Education. 

Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward 
an undergraduate degree by registering for 
certificates at the University of New Haven. 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 165 



Each certificate is carefully designed as an 
introduction to a particular course of study. 
Later, students may choose to apply the 
credits they have earned toward an 
undergraduate degree. 

Each certificate consists of a series of 
courses — from 15 to 30 credit hours — in a 
specialized area. The university offers 
certificates in: 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Graphic Design 

Interior Design 

Law Enforcement Science 

Mass Communication 

Paralegal Studies 

Photography 

School of Business 

Administrative Assistant Science 
Management Information Sytems 
Effective Presentation and 

Communication 
Health Care Systems Management 
Human Resources Management 
Office Systems Management 
Public Policy 
Security Management 
Supervisory Management 

School of Engineering 

Computer Applications 
Computer Programming 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism 
Administration 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Tourism and Travel Administration 

School of Professional Studies 

Arson Investigation 

Fire Prevention 

Hazardous Materials 

Hospital and Health Care, Fire Safety and 

Security 
Industrial Fire Protection 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Professional Pilot 



UNH in Southeastern 
Connecticut 

Director: John F. O'Brien, M.B.A. 

Associate Director: Audrey P. Clapham, 

Ph.D. 

For over two decades, the University of 
New Haven has been providing both 
undergraduate and graduate educational 
opportunities for residents in the Groton/ 
New London region. With the exception of 
some engineering laboratories, most of the 
courses required to complete an 
undergraduate degree are offered in 
Southeastern Connecticut. 

At the undergraduate and graduate 
levels, there are credit and non-credit 
offerings in both business and engineering. 
Undergraduate programs include: 
accounting, business administration, 
management information systems, human 
resource management, computer science, 
electrical engineering, industrial 
engineering, mechanical engineering and 
industrial/mechanical technology with an 
emphasis in shipbuilding or logistics. At the 
graduate level, courses are offered in the 
areas of business, computer and information 
science, industrial engineering, public 
administration, industrial relations, 
industrial/organizational psychology, 
mechanical engineering and operations 
research. 

Certificates are also available on both 
levels. Senior professional certificates are 
offered for those students who already have 
an advanced degree. Students pursuing 
certificates may apply credit earned to an 
appropriate degree program. Courses are 
scheduled often enough to enable students 
to complete certificates in a relatively short 
period of time. 

In addition to classes open to the general 
public, UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 
offers several programs to the employees of 
local industries on company premises. 
These programs include credit courses. 



166 



certificates, non-credit courses, and 
executive seminars. The UNH in 
Southeastern Connecticut staff periodically 
visit local business and industry 
representatives in order to inform them of 
university offerings that may be of interest 
to them. 

Both undergraduate and graduate 
programs that are open to the public are 
offered at one convenient location in 
Groton. Courses are held primarily in the 
early evening, consistent with the schedules 
of an adult working population. Through an 
agreement with the Groton Public Library, 
library facilities are made available to UNH 
students. A computer terminal facility is 
available to support programs. These 
terminals access the main academic system 
located at the main campus in West Haven. 
Students enrolled in computer-oriented 
courses are, therefore, afforded the same 
level of access as students enrolled in similar 
courses on-campus. More details on the 
university's computer facilities can be found 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

Admission and registration requirements 
for all UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 
programs are consistent with those for main 
campus students. Details can be found 
under the Division of Continuing 
Education. Acceptance into a degree 
program offered in Southeastern 
Connecticut means that students may enroll 
in the same program offered on the main 
campus. The university maintains an 
administrative office in Groton to assist 
students through the admissions and degree 
process. Faculty, professional staff and 
support personnel are assigned to the office 
on a full-time basis. 

Servicemembers Opportunity 

Colleges 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut has 
been designated as an institutional member 
of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges 
(SOC), a group of more than 400 colleges 
and universities providing voluntary post- 
secondary education to members of the 
military throughout the world. As a SOC 
member, UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 



recognizes the unique nature of the military 
lifestyle and has committed itself to easing 
the transfer of relevant course credits, 
providing flexible academic residency 
requirements, and crediting learning from 
appropriate military training and 
experiences. SOC has been developed 
jointly by educational representatives of 
each of the Armed Services, the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense and a consortium of 13 
leading national higher education 
associations; it is sponsored by the American 
Association of State Colleges and 
Universities (AASCU) and the American 
Association of Community and Junior 
Colleges (AACJC). 

The Core Curriculum 

In addition to department requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the 
university core curriculum. See page 19 for 
information. 



Division of Corporate 
and Professional 
Development 

Director: Martha M. Fox, B.S. 

Specialized, non-credit classes and 
seminars are offered by the Division of 
Corporate and Professional Development 
for undergraduate and graduate students, 
business and engineering professionals, 
public and private organizations, and the 
public at large. Students may explore new 
directions, acquire and/or advance 
professional skills, gain personal 
enrichment, or just keep in step with recent 
advances in their field. 

Together with students, industry and the 
academic community, the division develops 
a sequence of courses each year to meet 
current and future needs in the private and 
public sectors. The number of class hours in 
each course depends upon the time 
necessary to do justice to the topic or the 



Professional Studies and Continuing Education 167 



regulations of accrediting associations. 
Offerings normally include computer skills, 
professional engineering review, financial 
planning, real estate, insurance, employee 
benefits, supervisory and management 
training, and human resources 
management. 

Realizing the importance of computers in 
today's society, the division continues to 
offer a wide choice of introductory and 
advanced computer packages, Lotus 1-2-3; 
dBase IV; WordPerfect; and MS/DOS with 
new seminars being developed continually 
to meet demand. The division also offers 
"Computer Tutor" which provides 
individuals with intensive training on most 
software packages on a one-to-one basis. 

All courses offered throughout the year 
are staffed by the university faculty or by 
persons recognized as experts in their 
individual fields. Classes carry continuing 
education units (CEUs), a nationally 
recognized measurement that documents 
the type, quality and time period involved 
in non-credit coursework. A CEU is 
equivalent to 10 contact hours of a given 
course in which the student has earned a 
grade of A, B, C, D or Pass. The CEUs are 
transferable from one school to another. The 
Division of Corporate and Professional 
Development holds courses on the 
university's main campus in West Haven 
and at various off-campus locations 
throughout the state. 



Professional Development 

Seminars 

The Division of Corporate and 
Professional Development also coordinates 
conferences and short-term institutes for 
undergraduate and graduate students and 
for area professionals. The professional 
development seminars offer the latest in 
technology, current law and business 
practices. Seminars held on the West Haven 
campus in recent years include: the National 
Symposium for Occupational Safety and 
Health; Hazardous Materials Spill and Leak 
Control Workshop; Institute for Teacher 
Development; Safety, Health, and 
Environmental Training Institute of 
Connecticut; management development; 
supervisory training; human resources 
management programs and financial 
planning. 

Corporate On-Site Training 

The Division of Corporate and 
Professional Development also holds on-site 
seminars and training programs at many 
companies and organizations around the 
state. Through continued assessment of 
needs, evaluation of existing programs and 
creation of new programs, representatives 
of the division work with Connecticut 
businesses and industries to design and 
implement quality training programs. The 
university awards continuing education 
units (CEUs) and certificates to individuals 
who complete any professional 
development seminar. 




ammtm 



169 



COURSES 



Accounting 



A 101 Introduction to Financial 
Accounting 

Opened only to non-account- 
ing majors. Deals primarily with 
reporting the financial results of 
operations and financial position 
to investors, managers and other 
interested parties. Emphasizes 
the role of accounting informa- 
tion in decision making. 3 credit 
hours. 

A 102 Introduction to 
Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 101. This 
course is open only to non-ac- 
counting majors. The applica- 
tion of accounting in relation to 
current planning and control, 
evaluation of performances, spe- 
cial decisions, and long-range 
planning. Stress is on cost analy- 
sis. Addihonal topics include in- 
come tax planning, product cost- 
ing and quantitative techniques. 
3 credit hours. 

A 111 Introductory 
Accounting I 

This is a prerequisite to all 
other courses in accounting. A 
fundamental examination of the 
concepts, principles and proce- 
dures embodied in the financial 
accounting system. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the prepara- 
tion of financial statements for 
service-rendering and merchan- 
dising business concerns 
through the application of finan- 
cial accounting principles. 3 
credit hours. 



A 112 Introductory 
Accounting II 

Prerequisite: A 111. An exten- 
sion of the fundamental exami- 
nation developed in A 111. Top- 
ics include: stockholder's equity, 
dividends, cash flow statement, 
and bonds payable. 3 credit 
hours. 

A 220 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting I 

Prerequisite: A 112. A rigor- 
ous examination of financial ac- 
counting theory and practice ap- 
plicable to the corporate form of 
business organizarion. With an 
emphasis upon reporting corpo- 
rate financial status and results 
of operations, the course will in- 
clude: the principles governing, 
and the procedures implement- 
ing, accounting valuations for 
revenue, expense, gain, loss cur- 
rent assets and deferred charges. 
3 credit hours. 

A 221 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting II 

Prerequisite: A 220. Continu- 
ing the emphasis upon corporate 
financial reporting established in 
A 220. The principles and proce- 
dures applicable to accounting 
valuations for current liabilities, 
long-term liabilities, deferred 
credits and stockholders equity 
are examined. Special attention 
is directed to preparing the cash 
flow statement. 3 credit hours. 



A 222 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting III 

Prerequisite: A 221. Advanced 
topics include income tax alloca- 
tion, pensions and leases, ac- 
counting changes, price level 
changes, installment sales and 
consignments, and revenue rec- 
ognition. 3 credit hours. 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 

Prerequisite: A 112. An in- 
depth examination of the 
accounting principles and proce- 
dures underlying the determina- 
tion of product costs for 
manufacturing concerns. Em- 
phasis on job order costing sys- 
tems. Other topics are: budgets, 
standard costing, and CVP anal- 
ysis. 3 credit hours. 

A 224 Cost Accounting II 

Prerequisite: A 223. A contin- 
uahon of product cost determi- 
nation with an emphasis on pro- 
cess costing systems. Other 
topics are: joint and by-product 
costs, transfer prices, segment 
evaluation, and inventory man- 
agement. 3 credit hours. 

A 225 Advanced Managerial 
Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 224. A cap- 
stone course for managerial ac- 
counhng. Topics include: ad- 
vanced product coshng 
techniques, behavioral impact of 
accounting reports, SEC ac- 
counting, and current develop- 
ments in managerial accounting. 
3 credit hours. 



170 



A 331 Advanced Financial 
Accounting I 

Prerequisite: A 221. Advanced 
topics in financial reporting, in- 
cluding partnership accounting, 
consolidations, cost and equity 
methods, and purchase versus 
pooling methods. 3 credit hours. 

A 332 Advanced Financial 
Accounting II 

Prerequisite: A 221. A contin- 
uation of advanced financial ac- 
counting topics introduced in A 
331. Coverage includes: SEC re- 
quirements, not-for-profit ac- 
counting, trusts and estates, and 
bankruptcy. 3 credit hours. 

A 333 Auditing and Reporting 
Principles 

Prerequisite: A 222. A general 
examination of the role and func- 
tion of the independent auditor 
in the performance of the attest 
function. Emphasis will be 
placed on current auditing pro- 
nouncements, the audit report, 
stahstical sampling, evaluation 
of internal control and the deter- 
mination of the scope of an 
audit. Rules and standards of 
compilaHon and review reports 
are presented. 3 credit hours. 

A 334 Auditing Procedures 

Prerequisite: A 333. An exami- 
nahon and evaluation of the de- 
tailed procedures associated 
with auditing accounts related to 
a firm's financial position and 
operating results. An evaluaHon 
and documentation of internal 
control procedures will be an in- 
tegral aspect of the evaluation of 
the fairness of accounting bal- 
ances. A practice audit case will 
be used to develop an apprecia- 
tion for the application of audit- 
ing techniques. 3 credit hours. 



A 335 Federal Income 
Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 112. An intro- 
duction to the federal income tax 
law including history, economic 
and social aspects, sources of tax 
law and administration. Course 
coverage will be devoted primar- 
ily to individual taxation, includ- 
ing determination of gross in- 
come, deductions, exemptions, 
filing status and alternative 
methods of tax computation. 3 
credit hours. 

A 336 Federal Income 
Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 335. A contin- 
uation of A 335 including cover- 
age of property transactions, 
capital gains and losses, non-tax- 
able exchanges, tax accounting 
methods and elections, tax peri- 
ods and special tax computa- 
tions. Also an introduction to 
corporate taxation, organization, 
operation, distributions accumu- 
lations and liquidation. 3 credit 
hours. 

A 337 Federal Income 
Taxation III 

Prerequisites: A 335, A 336. A 
continuation of A 336 including 
taxation of S Corporations, part- 
nerships, federal estates and 
gifts and certain state transfer 
taxes. Also the income taxation 
of trusts and estates and tax ad- 
ministration and research. 3 
credit hours. 

A 350 Accounting Information 
Sytems 

Prerequisite: A 221. This 
course provides a thorough in- 
troduction to basic systems the- 
ory, a firm working knowledge 
of systems analysis and design 
techniques and an examination 
of various transaction cycles in 
the accounting system. Empha- 
sis is on EDP environments. 3 
credit hours. 



Art 



AT 101-102 Introduction to 
Studio Art 

Foundation study in the visual 
arts designed to heighten the 
student's aesthetic awareness 
and to provide an introduction to 
the study of drawing, painting 
and design using a variety of ma- 
terials. 3 credit hours. 

AT 105 Basic Drawing I 

A basic foundation course 
which includes a disciplined 
study in the fundamentals of 
drawing such as nature studies, 
perspective, exercises in coordi- 
nation of hand and eye. 3 credit 
hours. 

AT 106 Basic Drawing II 

A continuation of AT 105 with 
emphasis on perspective and de- 
piction of three-dimensional 
space and form by two-dimen- 
sional means. Study of architec- 
tural forms, natural objects and 
landscape. 3 credit hours. 

AT 122 Graphic Design 
Production 

Prerequisite: AT 100 level 
course, or consent of the instruc- 
tor. Studio introduction to the 
technical skills of graphic design 
including: copyfitting, type 
specification, typesetting, layout 
and mechanical preparation. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 201 Painting I 

Problems in pictorial composi- 
tion involving manipulation of 
form and color. Various tech- 
niques of applying pigment will 
be explored as well as mixing 
pigments, stretching and prim- 
ing canvases. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 171 



AT 202 Painting II 

A continuation of AT 201 with 
furtiier exploration of two-di- 
mensional pictorial arrange- 
ments of form and color for 
greatest visual effectiveness. 
Students will be encouraged to 
develop their own personal id- 
iom in the medium. 3 credit 
hours. 

AT 203 Graphic Design I 

Basic theoretical design stud- 
ies concentrate on the develop- 
ment of a design vocabulary con- 
sisting of an understanding of 
form, proportion, composition, 
rhythm, juxtaposition, progres- 
sion and balance. 3 credit hours. 

AT 204 Graphic Design II 

Prerequisite: AT 203. An in- 
vestigation of formal aspects of 
composition, organic and geo- 
metric form, graphic translaHon, 
and color. Emphasis on concept 
development, sequencing, and 
visual logic. 3 credit hours. 

AT 205 Ceramics I 

Introduction to clay as an ex- 
pressive medium. Hand-built 
and wheel-thrown methods 
with various glazing and decora- 
tive techniques. Stacking and fir- 
ing kilns. An exploration of 
three- dimensional form. Good 
for engineers. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 206 Ceramics II 

Continuation of AT 205 with 
free exploration of novel and ex- 
perimental approaches to the 
medium. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 



AT 209-210 Photography 
I and II 

Introduction to basic tech- 
niques, materials and aesthetic 
aspects of black and white pho- 
tography. Laboratory course 
with emphasis on the individual 
student's image making. Pho- 
tography II gives special atten- 
tion to problems dealing with 
images in groups, series and se- 
quences. New techniques and 
technical demonstrations. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 3 credit hours each. 

AT 211 Basic Design I 

A basic foundation course in- 
cludes exploration of two-di- 
mensional visual elements — 
line, color, light and dark, shape, 
size, placement, and figure- 
ground, and their effective use. 
A basic course for those wishing 
basic art understanding. 3 credit 
hours. 

AT 212 Basic Design II 

A continuation of AT 211, 
with concentration on three-di- 
mensional elements of design in- 
cluding positive and negative 
volumes, surfaces, structural 
systems, etc., employing a vari- 
ety of materials. 3 credit hours. 

AT 213 Color 

An intensive exploration of 
color perception and interaction 
with manipulation of form and 
color for greatest effectiveness in 
pictorial compositions. 3 credit 
hours. 

AT 216 Architectural Drawing 

Prerequisite: AT 105. Drawing 
as applied to architectural prob- 
lems. Drafting, drawing conven- 
tions, presentations, graphic 
symbols, line quality and con- 
text, and free hand drawing. 3 
credit hours. 



AT 221 Typography I 

Prerequisites: AT 203, AT 211. 
An introduction to the form lan- 
guage, terminology and use of 
typography. Letters, words and 
text arrangements form the com- 
ponents in these theoretical 
studies, which lead to simple 
communication exercises. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 222 Typography II 

Prerequisite: AT 221. Explo- 
ration of typographic structures 
and hierarchies as well as for- 
mal aspects of text. The typo- 
graphic principles are applied to 
complex communication prob- 
lems such as publication design 
and information graphics. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 225 Photographic Methods 

Prerequisites: AT 209 and 
AT 210. Technical course for the 
photography major. Study of 
camera types, including view 
camera, photographic optics, 
film types, sensitometry, photo- 
chemistry and zone system. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 231 History of Art I 

Western Art from cave art 
through the Middle Ages to 
Gothic. This course seeks to un- 
derstand expressive, social, cul- 
tural, political and economic as- 
pects of the cultures in which 
specific art styles and visual de- 
velopments emerged. This 
course forms the basic vocabu- 
lary for History of Art II. In- 
cludes economic and technologi- 
cal changes in the societies and 
their reflections in art. Appro- 
priate for business and engineer- 
ing students. 3 credit hours. 

AT 232 History of Art II 

Western Art from the Renais- 
sance to the twentieth century in 
Europe and America; a continua- 
tion of AT 231. 3 credit hours. 



172 

AT 233 History of Architecture 
and Interior Design 

A survey of developments in 
architecture from anHquity to the 
present day. Special consider- 
ation of the aesthetic and prach- 
cal relationships of architectural 
space to interior decor. For the 
major and those interested in 
this field. 3 credit hours. 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

Prerequisite: AT 105 or con- 
sent of the instructor. Study of 
drawing which concentrates on 
the human figure. 3 credit hours. 

AT 304 Sculpture I 

The exploration of three-di- 
mensional materials for maxi- 
mum effectiveness in expressive 
design. Experimentation with 
clay, plaster, wood, stone, can- 
vas, wire screening, metal, 
found objects. A basic under- 
standing of major, fundamental 
methods: casting and carving. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

AT 305 Sculpture II 

A continuation of AT 304 with 
further exploration of three-di- 
mensional materials and the pos- 
sibilities they present for creative 
visual statements. Laboratory 
Fee. 3 credit hours. 

AT 309 Photographic Design 

Prerequisite: AT 313 or AT 
314. Introduction to basic materi- 
als and techniques of black and 
white photography used in 
graphic design. The image as it 
relates to type and other art 
work, including posters, adver- 
tisements, manuals, etc. Labora- 
tory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

AT 310 Photographic Lighting 

Lighting techniques, natural 
and artificial. Control of form, 
texture and shape by light. Basic 
portraiture lighting, flash and 
tungsten lighting equipment, 
umbrellas, diffusers, etc. 3 credit 
hours. 



AT 311 Color Photography 

Theory and practice of color 
photography. Study of current 
color photographic materials 
and processes. 3 credit hours. 

AT 315 Printmaking 

The expressive potential of the 
graphic image through the tech- 
niques of silkscreen, wood cut, 
wood engraving, linoleum 
block-print, collotype, mono- 
type and photo-silkscreening. 
Problems in black-and-white 
and color. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 317 Interior Design 

Prerequisites: AT 211 or AT 
212; AT 233 or instructor's con- 
sent. A basic studio course with 
exploration of interior design 
problems and their relationship 
to architecture. Special emphasis 
on exploitation of space, form, 
color and textures for greatest ef- 
fectiveness. 3 credit hours. 

AT 322 Illustration 

A solid foundation in the tech- 
niques of creative illustration. 
Various media and their expres- 
sive possibilities will be studied: 
charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, 
wash, colored pencils, acrylic. 
Focuses on application of these 
techniques. 3 credit hours. 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

Focusing on art since 1945. 
The development of the present 
stems from ideas emanating 
from the 1870s — especially Im- 
pressionism; this course seeks to 
understand these connections. 
Emphasis on economic, histori- 
cal and technological develop- 
ments. Appropriate for busi- 
ness, communication, history 
and engineering students. 3 
credit hours. 



AT 333 Survey of 
Afro- American Art 

Black art in the United States 
from the Colonial period to the 
present. Consideration of Afri- 
can cultural influences. Analysis 
of modern trends in Black art. 3 
credit hours. 

AT 401 Studio Seminar I 

Prerequisites: AT 101-102, AT 
201, AT 302 or AT 313, and art 
electives. Drawing on develop- 
ments through their previous 
study, students will concentrate 
on major projects in the areas of 
their choice. 1-4 credit hours. 

AT 402 Studio Seminar II 

Prerequisite: AT 401 . Continu- 
ation of Studio Seminar I. 1-4 
credit hours. 

AT 402-412 Topics in the 
Visual Arts 

Variable credit. 

AT 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of the 
instructor and chairman of de- 
partment. Opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of interest. This course must 
be initiated by the student. 1-3 
credit hours. 



Aviation 

An asterisk (*) indicates flight 
training courses. This training is 
given by the university at Tweed- 
New Haven Airport. Students begin 
in primary trainers and move into 
complex, fully instrumented aircraft 
for commercial and instrument rat- 
ings. Experienced instructor person- 
nel are university staff members. The 
rigorous, structured program in- 
cludes the use of flight simulation de- 
vices and is fully integrated with ac- 
ademic training. An additional 
tuition is charged for flight training. 
Loans and grants are available for 
flight tuition. 



Courses 173 



AE 100 Aviation Science — 
Private 

Basic ground instruction in air- 
craft systems and controls. FAA 
regulations, air traffic control, 
communication, weight and bal- 
ance, meteorology, navigation, 
radio facilities and utilization, 
flight computer and aerody- 
namic theory. Successful com- 
pletion of FAA Private Pilot air- 
plane written examination is 
required. 3 credit hours. 

*AE 105F Primary Flight— Solo 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: 
AE 100. Introduction to flight. 
Concentration on the develop- 
ment of flying skills for solo 
flight. Criterion for solo flight is 
the instructor's discretion. Total 
flight time — approximately 20 
hours; dual instruction — 17 
hours; solo — three hours. If 
cleared for solo in less than 17 
hours dual instruction, student 
will continue with lessons in AE 
115. Laboratory fee. 1 credit 
hour. 

AE 110 Aviation Meteorology 

Discussion and interpretation 
of atmospheric phenomena in- 
cluding an analysis of aviation 
forecasts and reports. 3 credit 
hours. 

*AE 115F Private Pilot Flight 

Prerequisite: AE 105. Flight 
training in preparation for pri- 
vate pilot certification. Objective 
to master basic piloting skills 
and includes cross-country navi- 
gation, night flight and solo 
practice. Completion of FAA 
private, pilot's license is 
required. Total flight time — 
approximately 40 hours; dual 
instruction — 20 hours; solo — 
20 hours; simulator — 10 hours. 
If student earns the private 
license in less than the contract- 
ed time, student will continue 
with lessons in AE 125. 
Laboratory Fee. 2 credit hours. 



AE 120 Foundations of Aviation 

A study of the development of 
aviation from the first efforts to 
fly through the present. The so- 
cial and economic impact of avia- 
tion on society will be explored. 
3 credit hours. 

*AE 125F Cross-Country Flight 

Prerequisite: AE 115. Objec- 
tive to gain practical experience 
in cross-country navigation as 
pilot-in-command. Total flight 
time — 40 hours; total instructor 
time — five hours; simulator 
time — 10 hours. Laboratory 
Fee. credit hours. 

AE 130 Aviation Science — 
Commercial 

Prerequisite: AE 100. Ad- 
vanced ground instruction in 
navigation, flight computer, ra- 
dio navigation, aircraft perfor- 
mance, engine operation, avia- 
tion physiology and FAA 
regulations including FAR Parts 
121 and 135. Successful comple- 
tion of FAA. Commercial Pilot 
airplane written examination is 
required. 3 credit hours. 

*AE 135F Instrument Flight I 

Prerequisite: AE 115. Prereq- 
uisite or Corequisite: AE 200. In- 
troduction to basic instrument 
flight training and transition into 
high-performance, complex sin- 
gle engine aircraft. Total flight 
time — approximately 40 hours 
(primary trainer — 20 hours, 
complex aircraft — 20 hours); 
dual instruction — 23 hours; 
solo — 17 hours; simulator — 20 
hours. Laboratory Fee. 2 credit 
hours. 

AE 140 Concepts of 
Aerodynamics 

The study of basic aerodynam- 
ics including theory of flight, 
analysis of the four forces, high 
lift devices, subsonic, transonic 
and supersonic flight. 3 credit 
hours. 



*AE 145F Instrument Flight II 

Prerequisite: AE 135. Comple- 
tion of instrument flight train- 
ing. Navigation, enroute, hold- 
ing and approach procedures. 
Instrument rating will be re- 
quired for course completion. 
Total flight time — approxi- 
mately 40 hours (primary train- 
er — 20 hours, complex air- 
craft — 20 hours); dual 
instruction — 23 hours; solo — 
17 hours; simulator — 20 hours. 
Laboratory Fee. 2 credit hours. 

AE 200 Aviation Science — 
Instrument 

Prerequisite: AE 130. Ground 
instruction in preparation for the 
FAA Instrument Rating. Study 
includes a discussion of perti- 
nent regulations, IFR departure, 
enroute, and arrival procedures, 
flight planning, instrument ap- 
proaches, air traffic control pro- 
cedures and a review of meteor- 
ology. Successful completion of 
FAA Instrument-Airplane writ- 
ten examination is required. 3 
credit hours. 

*AE 205F Commercial Flight 

Prerequisite: AE 115. Prereq- 
uisite or Corequisite: AE 130. 
Preparation for the commercial 
pilot's license. Flight instruction 
and practice for the purpose of 
developing a high degree of 
judgment and coordination 
through practice of advanced 
maneuvers and cross-country 
flights. Commercial license will 
be required for course comple- 
tion. Total flight time — approxi- 
mately 30 hours (primary 
trainer — 15 hours, complex air- 
craft — 15 hours); dual instruc- 
tion — 10 hours; solo — 20 
hours; simulator — 10 hours. 
Laboratory Fee. 2 credit hours. 



174 



AE 210 Gas Turbine 
Powerplants 

Prerequisite: AE 100. Discus- 
sion of the fundamentals of de- 
sign and performance of aircraft 
jet engines including methods of 
construction, lubrication, engine 
operating procedures and con- 
trol. In addition, the theory of 
operation and analysis of prob- 
lems associated with aircraft 
components and systems, in- 
volving jet aircraft. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 230 Flight Instructor 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: AE 200. Discus- 
sion of the fundamentals of in- 
strucrion with specific emphasis 
on teaching as related to the 
flight instructor. Detailed study 
and analysis of maneuvers and 
topics required of the flight in- 
structor. In addition, emphasis 
will be placed on practice teach- 
ing. Successful completion of 
FAA written examinations 
(Flight Instructor Airplane and 
Fundamentals of Instructing) is 
required. 3 credit hours. 

*AE 235F Instructor Flight 

Prerequisite: AE 205. Prereq- 
uisite or Corequisite: AE 230. 
Flight instruction flight training 
in preparahon for the FAA Prac- 
tical Flight Test. Concentration 
on communication and analysis 
of maneuvers and procedures. 
Laboratory Fee. 1 credit hour. 

*AE 245F Multi-Engine Rating 

Prerequisite: AE 115. Prepares 
the commercial pilot for the FAA 
Multi-Engine Rating. Includes 
discussion of principles of multi- 
engine flight as well as flight 
training required for the rating. 
Multi-engine certification is re- 
quired. 1 credit hour. 



AE 255F Acrobatics 

Prerequisites: private pilot's 
license and AE 140. Acrobatic 
flight designed to improve pilot 
skills and to illustrate flight the- 
ory. Special attention to the 
effect of physical forces, aerody- 
namic theories, spatial orienta- 
tion and precise aircraft control. 
Maneuvers will include: loop, 
wingover, immelman, split-S, 
cloverleaf, aileron roll, barrel 
roll, Cuban eight and spin recov- 
ery. Basic fighter maneuvers 
may be demonstrated: hi-yo-yo, 
lo-yo-yo, barrel roll attack, 
scissors, vertical rolling scissors, 
inverted spin recovery. Dual 
instruction and solo practice. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

AE 300 Airline Transport Pilot/ 
Flight Engineer 

Prerequisites: AE 110, AE 130, 
AE 140, AE 200, AE 210. An in- 
depth knowledge of all aircraft 
systems as experienced on a 
large jet transport, advanced 
computer problems, transport- 
type airplane weight and balance 
computation, performance com- 
putations, meterology with em- 
phasis on upper level phenom- 
ena, regulations applicable to 
airline operations. Special em- 
phasis on crew concept in flight 
operations. Prepares student to 
take the FAA Airline Transport 
Pilot and Flight Engineer written 
exams. 3 credit hours. 



AE 310 Air Carrier Operations 

Prerequisites: AE 110, AE 130, 
AE 200. Air carrier operations as 
related to the flight crew and dis- 
patcher. FAR 121, weight and 
balance, manifests, planning 
forms, charts and graphs, per- 
formance considerations. Suc- 
cessful completion of the FAA 
Dispatcher written exam is re- 
quired. 3 credit hours. 

AE 320 Introduction to Air 
Traffic Control 

Prerequisites: AE 110, AE 130, 
AE 200. An introduction to the 
air traffic control system at the 
operational level. The compo- 
nents of the national airspace 
system with emphasis on inter- 
relationships between enroute, 
terminal, tower, flight service 
functions and the pilot. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 400 Airport Management 

Prerequisite: junior standing 
or approval of academic adviser. 
Discussion and study of opera- 
tional functions of airports, gen- 
eral aviation operations, termi- 
nal building utilization, support 
facilities, public relations and air- 
port financing as related to the 
airport manager. 3 credit hours. 

AE 410 Corporate Aviation 
Management 

Prerequisite: junior standing 
or approval of academic adviser. 
Discussion and study of the im- 
portance of air transportation 
to the corporation, operational 
structure and concepts, cost 
analysis and budget techniques, 
aircraft analysis, personnel se- 
lection and management, air- 
craft maintenance, training and 
scheduling. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 175 



AE 420 Airline Management 

Prerequisite: LA 101, FI 113 or 
approval of academic adviser. 
Discussion of air commerce re- 
lated to the transportation sys- 
tem. This course includes a 
study of commercial airlines and 
fixed-base operations. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 430 Aviation Safety Seminar 

Prerequisite: senior standing 
or approval of academic adviser. 
Critical analysis of aircraft acci- 
dents, accident prevention, de- 
velopment and evaluation of avi- 
ation safety programs. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 440 Aviation Law 

Prerequisites: LA 101, A 102, 
AE 400, AE 410, AE 420. The de- 
velopment of aviation law in- 
cluding federal and state regu- 
latory functions, rights and 
liabiliHes of aviators and opera- 
tors. Case histories, liens and se- 
curity interest in aircraft, torts, 
international conferences, bilat- 
eral and multilateral agree- 
ments, criminal statutes. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Consent of the 
program director. Opportunity 
for the student, under direction 
of a faculty member, to explore 
an area of interest. This course 
must be initiated by the student. 
3 credit hours. 



Biology 



Biology courses marked zvith an 
asterisk (*) are usually scheduled ev- 
ery other academic year. Courses 
marked with a dagger if) may be of- 
fered at the discretion of the depart- 
ment. 



BI 115 Nutrition and 
Dietetics 

The various nutrients, their 
food sources and the interaction 
between these nutrients and the 
body. Nutrition as related to 
disease. Energy production, 
weight-loss, weight-gain and 
normal diets. 3 credit hours. 

BI 116 Fundamentals of Food 
Science 

Various methods of food pro- 
cessing, preservation and stor- 
age. Sanitation, spoilage and 
deterioration of foods. Food ad- 
ditives and contaminants. Fed- 
eral regulatory agencies and 
food evaluation. 3 credit hours. 

BI 121-122 General and Human 
Biology with Laboratory I and II 

An introduction to the study 
of biology which integrates bio- 
logical principles and human bi- 
ology. Major topics covered are 
bio-chemistry, cell and molecu- 
lar biology, genetics, anatomy 
and physiology, behavior, ecol- 
ogy and evolution. The labora- 
tory involves experimentation 
and demonstration of principles 
covered in lecture. BI 121 is a 
prerequisite for BI 122. Labora- 
tory Fee. 4 credit hours each se- 
mester. 

tBI 125 Evolution 

Discussion of the processes re- 
sponsible for the origin and evo- 
lution of life on earth including 
human beings. 3 credit hours. 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science 
Majors with Laboratory I and II 

A discussion of the principles 
of biological organization from 
the molecular level through 
the ecological. The basic course 
for biology and environmental 
studies majors. Laboratory Fee. 
4 credit hours each semester. 



*BI 301 Microbiology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: 31 121 or BI 253 
and one college course in general 
chemistry. A history of microbi- 
ology and a survey of microbial 
life. Includes viruses, rickettsia, 
bacteria, blue-green algae and 
fungi; their environment, 
growth, reproduction, metabo- 
lism and relahonship to man. 
Laboratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

tBI 302 Bacteriology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253 
and one college course in general 
chemistry. Theoretical and labo- 
ratory study of the morphology, 
physiology and classificarion of 
bacteria. The application of these 
facts to agriculture, industry, 
sanitation, public health and dis- 
ease. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 

tBI 303 Histology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 121 or BI 253. 
Microscopic and chemical struc- 
ture of normal organs and hs- 
sues and their cell constituents 
as related to function. Micro- 
scopic observations, tissue stain- 
ing and slide preparation. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*BI 304 Immunology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253 
and one college course in general 
chemistry. The nature of anti- 
gens and antibodies, formation 
and action of the latter, other im- 
munologically active compo- 
nents of blood and tissues and 
various immune reactions. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 



176 



*BI 305 Developmental Biology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 122 or BI 254. 
Origin and development of tis- 
sues, organs and organ systems 
during the embryonic and post 
embryonic stages. In the labora- 
tory, the chick is grown and 
studied at various stages. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*BI 308 Cell Physiology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253, 
one college course in general 
chemistry and one college course 
in general physics. Basic theories 
of physiology as applied to 
plants and animals. Practical as- 
pects and experimental tech- 
niques studied in the laboratory. 
Laboratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*BI 310 Vertebrate Anatomy and 
Physiology with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121-122 or 
BI 253-254. Structure and func- 
tion of vertebrate organ systems 
with an emphasis on human sys- 
tems. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 

*BI 311 Genetics 

Prerequisite: BI 121 or BI 253. 
A survey of modern genetics 
with an emphasis on classical, 
human and molecular genetics. 
Laboratory exercises comple- 
ment lecture material. Labora- 
tory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*BI 315 Nutrition and Disease 

Prerequisites: BI 115 and ei- 
ther BI 122 or BI 254. Aspects of 
diet in treating and preventing 
various symptoms and syn- 
dromes, diseases, inherited er- 
rors of metabolism and physio- 
logical stress conditions. 3 credit 
hours. 



*BI 330 General Ecology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 122 or BI 254. 
The interactions of living organ- 
isms, including man, with each 
other and with their environ- 
ment. Discussion of population 
regulation, community struc- 
ture, geo-chemistry and energet- 
ics. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 

*BI 340 Biomedical 
Measurement and Control 

Application of computers and 
biomedical instrumentation to 
the measurement and control 
of biological systems. 3 credit 
hours. 

*BI 421 Toxicology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 122orCH 202. 
The effects of toxicants on living 
organisms. Mechanisms of ac- 
tion, absorption, distribution, ex- 
cretion and metabolism. Meth- 
ods of toxicologic evaluation. 3 
credit hours. 

tBI 433 Medical Microbiology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 301 or BI 302, 
CH 115. A study of the more 
common diseases caused by bac- 
teria, fungi and viruses, includ- 
ing their etiology, transmission, 
laboratory diagnosis and con- 
trol. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 



*BI 461 Biochemistry with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 201, CH 202, 
CH 203 and CH 204. A survey of 
biochemistry including a discus- 
sion of pH, buffers, water, bi- 
oenergetics, oxidative phosphor- 
ylation, enzymology, metabolic 
regulation, and the structure, 
function and metabolism of car- 
bohydrates, proteins, lipids, nu- 
cleic acids, vitamins and cofac- 
tors. Laboratory exercises are 
primarily designed to concen- 
trate on various experimental 
techniques including electropho- 
resis, chromatography, spectro- 
photometry, centrifugation and 
enzymology. Laboratory Fee. 4 
credit hours. 

*BI 502 Fresh Water and Marine 
Ecology 

Prerequisite: BI 330. The ecol- 
ogy of lakes, rivers, estuaries 
and the oceans. Laboratory in- 
volves extensive field work. Lab- 
oratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*BI 510 Environmental Health 

Prerequisites: BI 310 and CH 
110. The emphasis is on the 
health effects of environmental 
and occupaHonal pollutants and 
on the spread and control of 
communicable diseases. Toxico- 
logical and epidemiological tech- 
niques are discussed. 3 credit 
hours. 

+BI 517-518 Biotechniques 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 253, CH 115, 
junior or senior status biology or 
chemistry major. The theory and 
practice of research techniques 
used in the biological sciences. 
Laboratory Fee. 8 credit hours. 

BI 590 Special Topics in 
Biology/Science 

A course designed to discuss 
topics in biology or science 
which are of special or current 
interest. 1 to 4 credit hours. 



Courses 177 



BI 591-592 Seminar 

Prerequisite: biology major in 
junior or senior year. Meetings 
are held one hour weekly during 
which a research paper is re- 
viewed by a member of the class. 
Each student, with his adviser, 
must select an article in a biologi- 
cal periodical from which is de- 
veloped a 20-minute discourse 
on its content. 2 credit hours. 

BI 595-596 Laboratory Research 

Prerequisites: biology major, 
consent of the department. 
Choice of a research topic, litera- 
ture search, planning of experi- 
ments, experimentation and cor- 
relation of results in a written 
report, under the guidance of a 
department faculty member. 
Three hours of work per week 
required per credit hour. Labora- 
tory Fee. 1-6 credit hours. 

BI 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: biology major, 
consent of the department. 
Weekly conferences with ad- 
viser. Three hours of work per 
week required per credit hour. 
Opportunity for the student, un- 
der the direction of a faculty 
member, to explore an area of 
personal interest. A written re- 
port of the work carried out is re- 
quired. 1-3 credit hours, maxi- 
mum of 6. 



Business Law 

LA 101 Business Law I 

Introductory overview of the 
development of common, statu- 
tory and constitutional law and 
the underlying social and eco- 
nomic policies thereof. The na- 
ture, functions and limitations of 
law and the legal system in the 
resolution of a controversy as it 
relates to business activity with 
particular attention to contract 
law. 3 credit hours. For non-ac- 
counhng or non-finance majors. 



LA 111 Business Law I 

Law of contracts, negotiable 
instruments, sales, insurance. 
Particular attention will be de- 
voted to applicable provisions of 
the Uniform Commercial Code. 
3 credit hours. 

LA 112 Business Law II 

Prerequisite: LA 111. Law of 
agency, employer/employee, 
partnerships, corporations, se- 
curity and governmental regula- 
tion, real and personal property 
law, creditors rights and bank- 
ruptcy, wills and trusts. 3 credit 
hours. 



Chemistry 



Tlie chemistry courses marked 
with an asterisk (*) may, at times, be 
scheduled in the ei^ening. Chemistry 
courses marked with a dagger (f) are 
offered at the discretion of the depart- 
ment. 

CH 103 Introduction to General 
Chemistry 

Introductory course for stu- 
dents without a high school 
chemistry background. Inor- 
ganic chemistry, elements, com- 
pounds, balancing equations, 
stoichiometry, nomenclature, 
chemical bonding, the periodic 
table and solutions. CH 104 is 
taken concurrently with CH 103. 
3 credit hours. 

CH 104 Introduction to General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 103. Ex- 
periments include the measure- 
ment of physical properties, de- 
termination of percentage of 
composition and chemical for- 
mulas, reactions of representa- 
tive elements and ionic reac- 
tions. Laboratory Fee. 1 credit 
hour. 



*CH 107 Elementary Organic 
Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH 103, CH 104 
or CH 115, CH 117 or consent of 
the department. A one-semester 
introduction to one of the major 
fields of chemistry designed for 
students not majoring in chemis- 
try. Nomenclature, structure 
and the principal reactions of ali- 
phatic and aromatic organic 
chemistry. 3 credit hours. 

*CH 108 Elementary Organic 
Chemistry Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 103, CH 104 
or CH 115, CH 117 or consent of 
the instructor. A laboratory 
course designed to accompany 
CH 107. The principal opera- 
tions of organic synthesis such as 
refluxing, distillation, filtration 
and crystallization, are studied 
and applied in a number of sim- 
ple preparations. Laboratory 
Fee. 1 credit hour. 

*CH 110 Environmental 
Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 115, CH 117 
or consent of the instructor. A 
survey of the principal environ- 
mental contaminants and pollut- 
ants of air and water, including 
heavy metals, radioactive parti- 
cles, insecticides, detergents and 
others. Chemistry sufficient to 
understand the properHes of 
these materials and possible 
routes to their control will be in- 
troduced. 3 credit hours. 

CH 115 General Chemistry I 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or one 
unit of high school chemistry or 
written qualifying exam. Brief re- 
view of fundamentals including 
stoichiometry, atomic structure 
and chemical bonding. Other 
topics include thermochemistry, 
gas laws, properties of solution 
and inorganic coordination com- 
pounds. CH 117 is taken concur- 
rently with CH 115. 3 credit 
hours. 



178 

CH 116 General Chemistry II 

Prerequisites: CH 115, CH 117 
or the equivalent. Topics include 
nuclear chemistry; rates of chem- 
ical reactions; chemical equilibria 
including pH, acid-base, com- 
mon ion effect, buffers and solu- 
bility products; thermodynam- 
ics; an introduction to organic 
and biochemistry. CH 118 is 
taken concurrently with CH 116. 
3 credit hours. 

CH 117 General Chemistry I 
Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 115. Ex- 
periments include percent com- 
position, stoichiometry, heats of 
reacHon, gas laws, molecular 
model building and colligative 
properties of solutions. Labora- 
tory Fee. 1 credit hour. 

CH 118 General Chemistry II 
Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 116. Ex- 
periments include quantitative 
measurements of chemical reac- 
tion rates, equilibrium con- 
stants, the common ion effect, 
pH, buffers, electrochemical 
cells and simple organic synthe- 
sis. Laboratory Fee. 1 credit 
hour. 

+CH 120 Chemistry of Addicting 
and Hallucinogenic Drugs 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or con- 
sent of the instructor. The prop- 
erties, dosages, preparation and 
reactions of the addicting and 
hallucinogenic drugs. Alcohol, 
caffeine, nicotine, sedatives, 
stimulants, tranquilizers, LSD, 
mescaline, cannabis, narcotics 
and antidepressants. 3 credit 
hours. 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry 
I and II 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118. 
Common reactions of aliphatic 
and aromatic chemistry with em- 
phasis on functional groups and 
reaction mechanisms. CH 203 
and CH 204 are taken concur- 
rentiy with CH 201-202. 6 credit 
hours. 



CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I 
and II Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 201-202. 
The techniques, reactions, and 
syntheses commonly employed 
in the organic chemistry labora- 
tory are covered on microscale 
level interspersed with scaleups. 
Laboratory Fee. 2 credit hours. 

*CH 211 Quantitative Analysis 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118. 
Theory and laboratory training 
in the preparation of solutions, 
volumetric, gravimetric and 
spectrophotometric methods of 
analysis. Analysis of ores and 
ion-exchange chromatography. 
Laboratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*CH 221 Intrumental Methods 
of Analysis with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 211, CH 201, 
CH 203. The theory of various 
instrumental methods, includ- 
ing visible, ultraviolet and infra- 
red spectroscopy, gas chroma- 
tography, potentiometry, mass 
spectrometry and nuclear mag- 
netic resonance spectroscopy. 
Laboratory identification of com- 
pounds by the methods dis- 
cussed in the lectures. Labora- 
tory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

+CH 321-322 Plastics and 
Polymer Chemistry I and II 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118, 
CH 202, CH 204. All phases of 
the plastics and polymers field, 
including the chemistry in- 
volved, methods of production, 
physical properties and the uses 
of specific polymers. 6 credit 
hours. 

*CH 331-332 Physical Chemistry 
I and II 

Prerequisites: CH 116, PH 205, 
M 203 (may be taken concur- 
rently). Kinetic theory of gases, 
thermodynamics, phase equilib- 
ria, transport and surface phe- 
nomena, kinetics, quantum me- 
chanics, atomic and molecular 
spectroscopy. 3 credit hours 
each. 



CH 333-334 Physical Chemistry 
I and II Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 331-332. 
Laboratory training in vacuum 
line techniques and real time col- 
lection of temperature, pressure 
and spectrophotometric data by 
microcomputer. Experiments in- 
clude: diffusion, velocity and 
heat capacities of gases; calorime- 
try; phase diagrams of mixtures; 
electro-chemical properties, ki- 
netics of fast reactions, enzyme 
and oscillating reactions; rotatio- 
nal-vibrational spectroscopy. 1 
credit hour each. 

*CH 351 Qualitative Organic 
Analysis with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH 221. A one-semester labora- 
tory course deaUng with the sys- 
tematic identification of organic 
compounds. Specific methods 
include wet analysis, derivatiza- 
tion and physical analysis such 
as refractometry and molecular 
spectroscopy. Laboratory Fee. 4 
credit hours. 

CH 411 Chemical Literature 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH 332. Acquaints the student 
with the chemical literature and 
its use. Assignments include li- 
brary searches and the presenta- 
tion of a short seminar on a spe- 
cial topic approved by the 
faculty. 1 credit hour. 

CH 412 Seminar 

Prerequisite: CH 411. The stu- 
dent researches a specific current 
topic in chemical research or ap- 
plied chemistry and presents a 
term paper and a formal full- 
length seminar to the faculty and 
students. 1 credit hour. 



Courses 179 



tCH 441 Analytical Chemistry 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CH 221. Core- 
quisite: CH 332. Application of 
instrumental methods to inor- 
ganic and organic methods of 
analysis not covered in CH 221, 
including mass, ultraviolet and 
infrared spectrophotometry, 
chromatography and electro- 
chemical analysis. Application of 
on-line digital computers to 
chemical analysis. 4 credit hours. 

CH 451 Thesis 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH211, CH221, CH332. An 
original investigation in the labo- 
ratory or library under the guid- 
ance of a member of the depart- 
ment. A final thesis report is 
submitted. Laboratory Fee. 2 
credit hours. 

CH 471 Industrial Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 211, 
CH 221, CH 332. A course to 
bridge the gap from the aca- 
demic to the industrial world. 
Topics include material account- 
ing, energy accounting, chemi- 
cal transport, reactor design, 
process development and con- 
trol. 3 credit hours. 

*CH 501 Advanced Organic 
Chemistry 

Prerequisites; CH 202, CH 204. 
Topics include chemical bonding 
and molecular structure, investi- 
gation of mechanism, nucleo- 
philic substitution, electrophilic 
aromatic substiturion, elimina- 
tions, symmetry controlled reac- 
tions and Hammett plots. 3 
credit hours. 

*CH 521 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 331. Core- 
quisite: CH 332. The chemistry 
of coordination compounds: mo- 
lecular and electronic structures, 
stereochemistry, valence bond, 
ligand field, molecular orbital 
theories, thermal and photo- 
chemical reactions and mecha- 
nisms. 3 credit hours. 



CH 523 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry Laboratory 

Corequisite: CH 521. Experi- 
ments are performed in conjunc- 
tion with material presented in 
CH 521. Included are inorganic 
syntheses, resolution of diaste- 
reomers, conductance measure- 
ments, determination and inter- 
pretation of infrared, ultraviolet, 
mass, and nuclear magnetic res- 
onance spectra of inorganic com- 
pounds, and photochemistry. 
Laboratory Fee. 1 credit hour. 

tCH 561 Chemical Spectroscopy 

Prerequisite: CH 332. Intro- 
duction to the elementary theory 
with emphasis on techniques 
and interpretation of data ob- 
tained in applications of infra- 
red, Raman, visible, ultraviolet, 
nuclear quadrupole, electron 
spin and nuclear magnetic reso- 
nance spectroscopy to the solu- 
tion of chemical problems. 3 
credit hours. 

CH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: instructor's con- 
sent. Opportunity for the stu- 
dent under the direction of a fac- 
ulty member to explore an area 
of interest. This course may be 
used to do preliminary work on 
the topic studied for Thesis (CH 
451). 1-4 credit hours. 



Chemical 
Engineering 

CM 201 Fundamentals of 
Chemical Engineering I 

Prerequisites: CH 116, M 117, 
PH 150. An introduction to the 
profession of chemical engineer- 
ing and the application of funda- 
mental chemical, physical and 
mathematical concepts to the so- 
lution of chemical engineering 
problems. Topics include data 
analysis, physical property esti- 
mation, material balances, stoi- 
chiometry with single/multiple 
reactions and recycle calcula- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 



CM 202 Fundamentals of 
Chemical Engineering II 

Prerequisite: CM 201. A con- 
tinuation of CM 201 with em- 
phasis on the use of energy bal- 
ances for both non-reacrive and 
reactive processes. Combined 
material and energy balances are 
used in solving a variety of 
chemical engineering problems. 
3 credit hours. 

CM 301 Transport Phenomena 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: M 204, CM 202, 
PH 150. A unified treatment of 
the fundamentals of momentum 
and heat transfer with an intro- 
duction to mass transfer. Use of 
microscopic and macroscopic 
balances, continuity and Navier- 
Stokes principles to develop 
mathematical models of physical 
systems with applicaHons in 
fluid mechanics and thermal en- 
ergy transport. 3 credit hours. 

CM 310/410 Transport 
Operations I and II with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CM 301, CM 
311 (for CM 410). ApplicaHon of 
transport phenomena principles 
to systems involving momentum 
heat and mass transfer with em- 
phasis on equipment design. 
Topics include design of piping 
systems, flow instruments, fil- 
ters, heat exchangers, evapora- 
tors, staged separation equip- 
ment and others of current 
interest. Laboratory work in- 
cludes experiments in fluid flow, 
heat transfer and mass transfer, 
computer simularion, oral and 
written reports. 4 credit hours 
each. 



180 



CM 311 Chemical Engineering 
Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: CH 331 or ME 
301. Applications of the first and 
second laws of thermodynamics 
to batch and flow processes im- 
portant in chemical engineering 
for homogeneous and heteroge- 
neous systems, mixtures and 
pure materials. Topics include 
phase and chemical equilibria, 
chemical reacHons, thermochem- 
istry, thermodynamic proper- 
ties, miscibility and potential 
functions. 3 credit hours. 

CM 321 Reaction Kinetics and 
Reactor Design 

Prerequisites: CM 301, CM 
311, M 204. Homogeneous and 
heterogeneous catalyzed and 
non-catalyzed reaction kinetics 
for flow and batch chemical reac- 
tors. Application of kinetic data 
to both isothermal and noniso- 
thermal reactor design. This 
course is intended for both chem- 
ists and chemical engineers. 3 
credit hours. 

CM 401 Mass Transfer 
Operations 

Prerequisites: CM 310, CM 
311. The fundamentals of diffu- 
sion and mass transfer in solids, 
liquids and gases are applied to 
the analysis and design of pro- 
cess operations. Topics include: 
Pick's law, mass transfer coeffi- 
cients, interphase transfer, gas 
absorption, distillation, extrac- 
tion, humidification and drying. 
Emphasis is placed on the design 
of industrially important equip- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 



CM 420 Process Design 
Principles 

Prerequisites: CM 310, CM 
311, CM 321, IE 204. Stiidy and 
application of principles needed 
in the design of process systems. 
Topics include: cost estimation, 
hazard and safety analysis, ethi- 
cal concerns, preliminary design 
techniques, optimization, com- 
puter-aided design, alternative 
designs and technical reports. 
Methods include team and indi- 
vidual assignments, oral and 
written presentations. 3 credit 
hours. 

CM 421 Plant and Process 
Design 

Prerequisites: CM 401, CM 
410, CM 420, IE 204 and senior 
standing. A capstone course in 
the design of processing plants 
and equipment, applying princi- 
ples from transport operations, 
thermodynamics, kinetics and 
economics. Students work indi- 
vidually and in groups to develop 
flowsheets, select equipment, 
specify operating conditions and 
analyze designs from technical, 
economic and safety perspec- 
tives. Extensive report writing 
and oral presentations. 3 credit 
hours. 

CM 431 Process Dynamics and 
Control with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: EE 211, M 204, 
CM 310. Fundamental principles 
of chemical process dynamics 
used in the measurement and 
control of process variables such 
as temperature, pressure and 
flow rate. Linear and non-linear 
control theory and stability anal- 
ysis techniques such as root lo- 
cus and frequency response are 
presented. Laboratory exercises 
include design, assembly and 
testing of flow, level, tempera- 
ture and concentration control 
loops and control of distillation 
column by computer. 4 credit 
hours. 



Civil Engineering 

CE 201 Statics 

Prerequisites: PH 150, M 117. 
Composition and resolution of 
forces in two and three dimen- 
sions. Equilibrium of forces in 
stationary systems. Analysis of 
trusses. Centroids and second 
moments of areas, distributed 
forces and friction. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 202 Strength of Materials I 

Prerequisite: CE 201. Elastic 
behavior of structural elements 
under axial, flexural and tor- 
sional loading. Shear and bend- 
ing moment diagrams. Stress in 
and deformation of members, in- 
cluding beams. 3 credit hours. 

CE 203 Elementary Surveying 

Prerequisite: M 115 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Theory and 
practice of surveying measure- 
ments using tape, level and tran- 
sit. Field practice in traverse sur- 
veys and leveling. Traverse 
adjustment and area computa- 
tions. Adjustment of instru- 
ments, error analysis. Labora- 
tory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of 
Materials 

Prerequisites: PH 150, M 118 
(may be taken concurrently). Ef- 
fects and distribution of forces 
on rigid bodies at rest. Various 
types of forces systems, friction, 
center of gravity, centroids and 
moments of inertia. Relation be- 
tween externally applied loads 
and their internal effects on non- 
rigid, deformable bodies. Stress, 
strain, Hooke's law, Poisson's 
ratio, bending and torsion, shear 
and moment diagrams, deflec- 
tion, combined stress and 
Mohr's circle. This course may 
not be substituted for the sepa- 
rate courses CE 201 and CE 202. 
4 credit hours. 



Courses 181 



CE 206 Engineering Geology 

Prerequisites: E 110, M 117. 
Introduction to relationship be- 
tween geologic processes and 
principles to engineering prob- 
lems. Topics include engineer- 
ing properties of rock as a con- 
struction and foundation 
material, soil formation and soil 
profiles and subsurface water. 3 
credit hours. 

CE 301 Transportation 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: E 110, M 117. A 
study of planning, design and 
construction of transportation 
systems including highways, 
airports, railroads, rapid transit 
systems and waterways. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 302 Building Construction 

Prerequisite: E 110. Introduc- 
tion to the legal, architectural, 
structural, mechanical and elec- 
trical aspects of building con- 
struction. Principles of drawing 
and specification preparation 
and cost estimating. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 304 Soil Mechanics 

Prerequisites: M 203, CE 202. 
Soil classifications. Methods of 
subsurface exploraHon. Design 
principles are related to the po- 
tential behavior of soils sub- 
jected to various loading condi- 
tions. Seepage analyses. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 306 Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: ME 204. The me- 
chanics of fluids and fluid flow. 
Fluid statics, laminar and turbu- 
lent flow. Energy, continuity 
and momentum. Analysis and 
design of pipes and open chan- 
nels. Orifices and weirs. 3 credit 
hours. 



CE 312 Structural Analysis 

Prerequisites: CE 202, CS 102. 
Basic structural engineering top- 
ics on the analysis of beams, 
trusses and frames. Topics in- 
clude: load criteria and influence 
lines; force and deflection analy- 
sis of beams and trusses; analysis 
of indeterminate structures by 
approximate methods, superpo- 
sition and moment distribution. 
Framing systems of existing 
structures are studied. Com- 
puter applications and a semes- 
ter long design-analysis project 
requiring engineering decisions. 
3 credit hours. 

CE 315 Environmental 
Engineering and Sanitation 

Prerequisites: E 110, CH 116, 
CH 118, CE 306. Introduction to 
hydrology and water demand 
projections. Problems concern- 
ing public health, water and 
wastewater treatment, solid 
waste disposal, air pollution, 
and on-site disposal of domestic 
wastes. Design of water, waste- 
water and storm water convey- 
ance systems. 3 credit hours. 

CE 317 Structural Design 
Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: CE 312. Funda- 
mentals of structural behavior of 
members, connections and 
structural systems of steel and 
concrete. Effect on members un- 
der a variety of loading condi- 
tions varying from dead load 
through overloads producing 
failure. Computer applications 
and a semester-long building de- 
sign project. 3 credit hours. 



CE 323 Mechanics and 
Structures Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CE 312 (may be 
taken concurrently). Experi- 
ments covering mechanics and 
structural engineering. The re- 
sponse of metals and wood to 
different loading conditions will 
be examined. Laboratory instru- 
mentation will be studied. Lab- 
oratory procedures, data col- 
lection, interpretation and 
presentation will be empha- 
sized. Laboratory Fee. 2 credit 
hours. 

CE 325 Project Planning and 
Scheduling 

Prerequisite: M 117. Applica- 
tion of network analogy, critical 
path method, project evaluation 
review technique, and prece- 
dence diagrams to planning, 
scheduling, and controlling de- 
sign and construction projects. 
Computer applications. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 327 Soil Mechanics and 
Concrete Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CE 304 (may be 
taken concurrentiy). Experi- 
ments and testing in the areas of 
soil mechanics and concrete. 
Laboratory procedures, data col- 
lection and interpretation, and 
presentation of data will be em- 
phasized. Laboratory Fee. 2 
credit hours. 

CE 328 Hydraulics and 
Environmental Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CE 306 and 
CE 315 (may be taken concur- 
rentiy). Experiments and testing 
in the areas of hydraulics and en- 
vironmental engineering. Lab- 
oratory procedures, data col- 
lection and interpretation, 
presentation of data will be em- 
phasized. Laboratory Fee. 2 
credit hours. 



182 



CE 401 Foundation Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 304 or in- 
structor's consent. Application 
of soil mechanics to foundation 
design, stability, settlement. Se- 
lection of foundation type — shal- 
low fooHngs, deep foundaHons, 
pile foundaHons, mat founda- 
tions. Subsurface exploration. 3 
credit hours. 

CE 402 Water Resources 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: CE 306, CE 315. 
Study of principles of water re- 
sources engineering including 
surface and ground water hy- 
drology. Design of water supply, 
flood control and hydroelectric 
reservoirs. Hydraulics and de- 
sign of water supply distribution 
and drainage collection systems 
including pump and turbine de- 
sign. Principles of probability 
concepts in the design of hy- 
draulic structures. General re- 
view of water and pollution con- 
trol laws. 3 credit hours. 

CE 403 City Planning 

Prerequisite: E 110. Engineer- 
ing, social, economic, political 
and legal aspects of city plan- 
ning. Emphasis placed on case 
studies of communities in Con- 
necticut Zoning. Principles and 
policies of redevelopment. 3 
credit hours. 

CE 404 Sanitary Engineering 

Prerequisites: CE 306, CE 315. 
Study of physical, chemical and 
biological aspects of water qual- 
ity and pollution control. Study 
of unit processes and operations 
of water and waste water treat- 
ment including industrial waste 
and sludge processing. Design 
of water treatment and sewage 
treatment systems including 
sludge treatment and incinera- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 



CE 405 Indeterminate Structures 

Prerequisites: ME 307 or CE 
312; CS 102, ME 204. The analy- 
sis of statically indeterminate 
structures. Topics include ap- 
proximate methods, moment 
distribution, conjugate beam, 
energy methods, influence lines 
and an introduction to matrix 
methods. Computer applica- 
tions and a project requiring 
structural engineering decisions. 
3 credit hours. 

CE 407 Professionalism and 
Ethical Practice of Engineering 

Prerequisite: Senior status, or 
permission of instructor. Princi- 
ples of engineer-client, engineer- 
society and owner-contractor 
relationships examined from 
ethical, legal and professional 
viewpoints. Examination of 
codes of ethics and preparation 
of contract documents. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 408 Steel Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 317. Analy- 
sis, design and construction of 
steel structures. Topics include 
tension, compression and flex- 
ural members; connections; 
members subjected to torsion; 
beam-columns; fabrication, erec- 
tion and shop practice. Designs 
will be based on Load Resistance 
Factor Design (LRFD) and Al- 
lowable Stress Design (ASD). 3 
credit hours. 

CE 409 Concrete Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 317. Analysis 
and design of reinforced con- 
crete beams, columns, slabs, 
footings, retaining walls. Basic 
principles of prestressed and 
precast concrete. Fundamentals 
of engineering drawings. 3 credit 
hours. 



CE 410 Land Surveying 

Prerequisite: consent of in- 
structor. A study of boundary 
control and legal aspects of land 
surveying, including deed re- 
search, evidence of boundary lo- 
cation, deed description and 
riparian rights. Theory of mea- 
surement and errors, position 
precision, state plane coordinate 
systems, photogrammetry. 3 
credit hours. 

CE 411 Highway Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 301 or in- 
structor's consent. Highway eco- 
nomics and financing. Study of 
highway planning, geometric 
design and capacity. Pavement 
and drainage design. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 412 Wood Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 202. Study of 
the growth and structure of 
wood and their influence on 
strength and durability, preser- 
vation and fire protection. The 
analysis and design of structural 
members of wood including 
beams, columns, and trusses; 
connections; glulam and ply- 
wood members. The design of 
wood structures. 3 credit hours. 

CE 413 Masonry Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 202. The de- 
sign and analysis of brick and 
concrete masonry non-rein- 
forced and reinforced structures. 
Strength, thermal, fire and 
sound characteristics, testing 
and specifications. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 414 Route Surveying 

Prerequisite: CE 203. A con- 
tinuation of elementary survey- 
ing covering principles of route 
surveying, stadia surveys, prac- 
tical astronomy, aerial photogra- 
phy, adjustment of instruments. 
Field problems related to class- 
room designs. 3 credit hours. 



CE 501 Senior Project 

Prerequisite: senior status. Su- 
pervised individual or group 
project. The project may be the 
preparation of a set of contract 
documents for the construction 
of a civil engineering facility, re- 
search work with a report, or a 
project approved by the faculty 
adviser. 3 credit hours. 

CE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of in- 
structor and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the stu- 
dent to explore an area of 
interest under the direction of a 
faculty member. Course must be 
initiated by the student and have 
the approval of the faculty ad- 
viser and chairman. 1-3 credit 
hours. 



Communication 

CO 100 Human Communication 

The basic course in communi- 
cation. Creates within each stu- 
dent an awareness of the omni- 
presence of communication and 
the problems surrounding the 
human communication process. 
Recommended for all UNH stu- 
dents, regardless of major field 
of study. 3 credit hours. 

CO 101 Fundamentals of Mass 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. Intro- 
duction to the mass media of 
newspapers, film, magazines, 
radio, television, trade publica- 
tions and public relations. 
Course emphasizes media's im- 
pact upon society. 3 credit hours. 

CO 103 Audio in Media 

Prerequisite: CO 114. Con- 
cerned with sound as used in ra- 
dio, television and film. Course 
entails lectures, demonstration, 
and lab practice of sound pro- 
duction and transmission. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 



CO 109 Communication for 
Management and Business 

Practical course intended to 
develop the presentational skills 
of students interested in man- 
agement and business. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 114 Production 
Fundamentals 

Introduction to theory and 
technique in sound, video, film 
and print media. Several team 
projects will provide a funda- 
mental production orientation in 
each medium as well as provide 
the environment to discuss goals 
and objectives of production. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CO 200 Theories of Group 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. Theoret- 
ical aspects of communication 
which affect the accomplishment 
of group tasks, and techniques of 
observation of group processes, 
particularly within the frame- 
work of media production 
crews. 3 credit hours. 

CO 203 Radio Production 

Prerequisite: CO 103. Theory 
and practice of techniques in- 
volved in the function and oper- 
ation of a radio station. Micro- 
phone techniques, engineering 
operations, transmitter read- 
ings, logging and programming 
will be included. Laboratory Fee. 
3 credit hours. 

CO 205 Intercultural 
Communication 

A theoretical and practical sur- 
vey of intercultural communica- 
tion processes. This course is 
concerned with the interper- 
sonal dimensions of intercultural 
communication and will exam- 
ine the distinctive cultural orien- 
tations, behaviors, expectations, 
and values, that effect communi- 
cation situations. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 183 

CO 208 Introduction to 
Broadcasting 

General survey and back- 
ground of broadcasting, cable, 
pay and premium TV services 
and new technologies. Current 
changes, law, regulation, financ- 
ing and public input are exam- 
ined. Emphasis is placed on cur- 
rent status and future potential 
of these industries. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 212 Television Production I 

Prerequisite: CO 114. Intro- 
duction to the mechanics, tech- 
niques, and aesthetic elements 
of television producrion. Course 
provides the basic grounding in 
the art and craft of the medium. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CO 214 Elements of Film 

Prerequisite: CO 114 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 
Stresses the understanding of 
film as a creative form of commu- 
nication. Student is introduced 
to basic techniques of motion 
picture production through lec- 
tures, audio-visual activity, and 
small group involvement. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CO 220 Film Production I 

Prerequisite: CO 214. Involves 
the transformation of an original 
idea into film: Initial analysis, 
proposed treatment plan, se- 
quencing, film scripting, pre- 
production planning, nature of 
the production process. A short 
film is produced through team 
effort. Laboratory Fee. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 300 Persuasive 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. An ex- 
amination of the theories of per- 
suasive communication includ- 
ing the influence and effect of 
communication on the rhetoric 
of politics, religion, advertising, 
etc. 3 credit hours. 



184 

CO 302 Social Impact of Media 

Prerequisite: CO 101. Exam- 
ines such problems as regulatory 
control of the media, law and 
ethics, and the behavioral as- 
pects of mass and interpersonal 
communication. Students exam- 
ine the variety of media writing 
and commence writing their 
own media messages. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 307 Writing for the Media 

A study of drills and exercises 
in writing television and radio 
news, drama, public service an- 
nouncements, and film docu- 
mentaries. Emphasis is placed 
on first-hand practical experi- 
ence assignments and criticism 
of complete copy. 3 credit hours. 

CO 308 Broadcast Journalism 

Entails practice in newsgather- 
ing, editing, writing, and use of 
news services and sources. Cre- 
ating documentary and special 
event programs through film for 
television news, on-the-spot 
film, and video-tape reporting 
are included. 3 credit hours. 

CO 309 Public Relations Writing 

Examines the elements of 
good writing as applied to the 
public relations field. Students 
research and identify general 
and specialized audience needs 
and create messages to satisfy 
those needs. They plan and exe- 
cute projects within selected me- 
dia such as newspapers, maga- 
zines, TV, radio and film, as well 
as speeches for public appear- 
ances. 3 credit hours. 

CO 310 Pictorial Journalism 

The study of photography and 
media design as an active obser- 
vation and interpretation of 
events in the print media. 3 
credit hours. 



CO 312 Television Production II 

Prerequisite: CO 212. An in- 
termediate course designed to 
provide the student with the op- 
portunity to coordinate the 
many areas of TV production. 
Video tape and live production 
techniques are employed. Labo- 
ratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CO 317 Advanced Writing for 
the Media 

Prerequisite: CO 307. Plan- 
ning and writing longer forms of 
scripts, emphasizing documen- 
tary and dramatic writing for 
production. 3 credit hours. 

CO 320 Film Production II 

Prerequisite: CO 220. The cre- 
ative process involved in trans- 
lating advertising copy to film 
based upon advertising objec- 
tives and consumer motivation, 
appeals, and behavior. Involves 
production of filmed "spots" by 
team efforts. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 

CO 340 The History of Film 

A survey of the historical de- 
velopment of the film medium 
consisting of lectures, discus- 
sions and the screening of films 
which demonstrate the interrela- 
tionships between the historical 
development and the establish- 
ment of the film medium as a 
powerful communicative art 
form. 3 credit hours. 

CO 399 Media Campaigns 

Examines the role played by 
the mass media in political cam- 
paigning. Students look at his- 
torical perspectives and study 
current trends. FCC laws regard- 
ing advertising, lowest unit cost, 
section 315 and other regulations 
will be examined. Students view 
videotapes of past political me- 
dia campaign examples and have 
the opportunity to participate in 
and produce hypothetical politi- 
cal media campaigns. 3 credit 
hours. 



CO 400 Communication in 
Organizations 

Communication examined in 
formal organizational contexts 
such as school, industry, hospi- 
tals and government. Students 
will be prepared to function 
more effectively in organiza- 
tions' dynamic communication 
systems, and to solve problems 
relative to the interaction of orga- 
nizations with the environment 
via the interactions of people and 
messages. 3 credit hours. 

CO 402 Internship 

An internship program for 
students who qualify and would 
like an in-field experience at local 
radio stations, television sta- 
tions, advertising agencies, etc. 
3 credit hours. 

CO 408 Public Relations- 
Systems and Practices 

This course makes students 
aware of the depth and sensitiv- 
ity of the role public relations 
plays in today's business envi- 
ronment. Orients students to 
career paths utilizing commu- 
nication, journalistic and man- 
agement skills as well as skills ac- 
quired in business and English 
courses. Utilizes the lecture/dis- 
cussion, case study and guest 
speaker approach to teach all 
students the historical, theoreti- 
cal, practical and technical appli- 
cations of public relations. 3 
credit hours. 

CO 410 Management 
Communication Seminar 

Open to all upper division stu- 
dents, regardless of major. In- 
volves structure and function of 
communication in organiza- 
tions. Practice in understanding 
and managing interpersonal dif- 
ferences. Emphasizes concepts 
and principles needed for effec- 
tive management of organiza- 
tional communication processes. 
3 credit hours. 



CO 412 Advanced Television 
Production 

Prerequisite: CO 312. Essen- 
tials of budgeting, marketing 
and regulatory policies and 
rules. Production teams are 
formed to produce sophisticated 
local television programs under 
close supervision. 3 credit hours. 

CO 415 Broadcast Management 

Prerequisite: CO 208. Involves 
the administrative and person- 
nel problems of television and 
radio studio management; 
broadcast engineering; local 
sales; continuity; and program- 
ming. Discussions will include 
scheduling and the development 
of facilities. 3 credit hours. 

CO 440-454 Special Topics 

Special topics in communica- 
tion which are of special interest 
or current interest. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 500 Seminar in 
Communication Studies 

This capstone course will inte- 
grate the current and developing 
trends with the individual stu- 
dent's interest and perspectives. 
Students will present for discus- 
sion and examination issues of 
interest within a unifying theme. 
3 credit hours. 

CO 599 Independent Study in 
Communication 

Prerequisite: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. 3-6 hours are usu- 
ally reserved for a senior project- 
paper in communication; stu- 
dent may take 1-3 credit hours of 
CO 599 per semester with a max- 
imum of 6. Independent study 
credits earned in other depart- 
ments are applied toward the 
maximum of 6 in communica- 
tion. Opportunity for the stu- 
dent under the direction of a fac- 
ulty member to explore an area 
of interest. 1-3 credit hours. 



Computer Science 

CS 102 Introduction to 
Programming/FORTRAN 

Prerequisite: M 115. A first 
course in computer program- 
ming using the FORTRAN lan- 
guage, for engineering and sci- 
ence students. Problem solving 
methods and algorithm develop- 
ment. Designing, coding, de- 
bugging and documenting FOR- 
TRAN programs using good 
programming style. 3 credit 
hours. 

CS 104 Programming in RPG 

An introductory course for 
management information sys- 
tems majors that will familiarize 
the student with an interachve 
programming environment, and 
with the most common types of 
report programs required in a 
business environment. Empha- 
sis will be on the applications of 
computers in business. The lan- 
guage RPG will be used to illus- 
trate the concepts of input, out- 
put, data processing and 
reports. Several programs will be 
written. 3 credit hours. 

CS 105 Introduction to 
Programming/COBOL 

Prerequisites: M 109 and ei- 
ther CS 104 or CS 108. A course 
in computer programming using 
the COBOL language, for busi- 
ness data processing majors. 
Problem-solving methods and 
structured programming style. 
Designing, coding, debugging 
and documenting COBOL pro- 
grams. Student programs will be 
oriented toward business prob- 
lems. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 185 

CS 106 Introduction to 
Programming/PASCAL 

Prerequisite: M 115 or equiva- 
lent. A first course in computer 
science using the PASCAL lan- 
guage, for computer science ma- 
jors and minors. Introduces 
problem solving methods and al- 
gorithm development and 
teaches how to design, code, de- 
bug and document programs us- 
ing good style. 3 credit hours. 

CS 107 Introduction to Data 
Processing 

An introduction to the con- 
cepts underlying the modern ap- 
plication of computer systems. 
Use of application software for 
word processing, spread sheets, 
and data bases. Intended for 
business and humanities stu- 
dents taking only one computer 
course or as a basis for further 
work with computers. Not to be 
taken for credit by CS majors. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 108 Introduction to 
Programming/BASIC 

An introductory course. The 
student will become familiar 
with computers and write sev- 
eral programs in the BASIC lan- 
guage. Emphasis will be on 
problems drawn from everyday 
life. Not to be taken for credit by 
CS majors. 3 credit hours. 

CS 224 Advanced 
Programming/FORTRAN 

Prerequisite: CS 102 or 
CS 228. Continues to develop 
program design techniques, es- 
pecially involving larger and 
more complex problems. Simple 
data structures. Modular pro- 
gram design. Advanced debug- 
ging techniques. Programming 
problems will involve typical en- 
gineering applicahons. Not to be 
taken for credit by CS majors. 3 
credit hours. 



186 

CS 225 Advanced 
Programming/COBOL 

Prerequisite: CS 105. Contin- 
ues to develop program design 
techniques and apply them to in- 
creasingly complex business ori- 
ented problems. Topics include 
using COBOL interactively, ta- 
bles, the sort-merge utility, sub- 
routines, advanced debugging. 
Not to be taken for credit by CS 
majors. 3 credit hours. 

CS 226 Data Structures and 
Algorithms I 

Prerequisite: CS 106 or 
CS 227. Objectives are to con- 
tinue to develop program design 
techniques and apply them to 
more complex problems. Data 
structures: linked lists, stacks 
and hash tables. String process- 
ing. Recursion. Debugging tech- 
nique. Programming problems 
will be oriented toward systems 
programming. 3 credit hours. 

CS 227 Intensive PASCAL 

Prerequisite: M 109 or equiva- 
lent and competency in COBOL, 
C, FORTRAN or PL/1. Objec- 
tives: to teach the syntax and idi- 
osyncrasies of the PASCAL lan- 
guage. An introduction to the 
PASCAL language for compe- 
tent programmers, which will 
prepare them for CS 226. Covers 
all the material of CS 106, but at 
an accelerated rate. Intended for 
students who transfer into one of 
the computer science programs. 
Not to be taken for credit by a 
student with credit for CS 106. 1 
credit hour. 

CS 228 Intensive FORTRAN 

Prerequisite: CS 226 or equiva- 
lent. An introduction to FOR- 
TRAN programming by analogy 
to PASCAL. Covers the material 
of CS 102 at an accelerated rate. 
1 credit hour. 



CS 230 Introduction to Systems 
Programming/C & UNIX 

Prerequisite: CS 226. The C 
language is introduced and used 
for programming exercises of a 
non-numeric, systems-oriented 
nature. Topics covered include 
bit-manipulaHon, string process- 
ing, data compaction, the inter- 
face between C and UNIX, etc. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 234 Machine Organization/ 
Assembly Language 

Prerequisite: CS 224 or 225 or 
226. Study of the functional char- 
acteristics of computers and their 
peripherals. Programming in as- 
sembly language. Topics: data 
representation, error flags, ad- 
dressing techniques, macros, file 
I/O, program linkage, inter- 
rupts, TSR programming. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 237 Data Structures and 
Algorithms II 

Prerequisite: CS 226. The fol- 
lowing topics are covered: data 
structures — trees, graphs, hash 
tables. Recursive techniques — 
divide and conquer, backtrack- 
ing, recursion elimination. Algo- 
rithms — sorting, searching, gar- 
bage collection, storage 
management, shortest paths, 
parsing. Analysis of the com- 
plexity of algorithms. The re- 
quired programming will be 
done in PASCAL. 3 credit hours. 

CS 310 Computing Theory 

Prerequisites: CS 237 and 
M 270. Central topics in the the- 
ory of computers and computa- 
tion. Topics include: introduc- 
tions to algebraic methods, proof 
procedures, and formal systems; 
strings, regular expressions, for- 
mal languages, grammars, and 
the Chomsky hierarchy; finite 
automata, pushdown automata, 
theory of automata; decidability; 
Turing machines and other for- 
mal computer models; elements 
of complexity theory. 3 credit 
hours. 



CS 320 Operating Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 226 and CS 
234. A study of operating sys- 
tems, historical and modern. 
Process management, concur- 
rency, deadlock, memory man- 
agement, file systems, inter- 
rupts, resource allocation, 
protection. 3 credit hours. 

CS 337 File Structures 

Prerequisite: CS 237. Issues in 
the design, implementation, se- 
lection, and use of computer files 
for external storage of data. Con- 
currency control, error recovery, 
and query processing. Program- 
ming projects required. 3 credit 
hours. 

CS 338 Structure of 
Programming Languages 

Prerequisite: Competence in 
three programming languages. 
Language is dissected in order to 
study its components, imple- 
mentation, and internal opera- 
tion. The structure, syntax and 
semantic aspects of several lan- 
guages are studied. Short pro- 
grams will be written in two new 
languages. 3 credit hours. 

CS 339 Theory and Construction 
of Compilers 

Prerequisites: CS 237, CS 234, 
CS 310 and CS 338. Assemblers, 
interpreters and compilers. Fi- 
nite state machines and their ap- 
plication to lexical analysis. Pars- 
ing, syntactic analysis and P- 
code. Semantic analysis, code 
generation and opHmization. 
Programming in PASCAL may 
be required. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 187 



CS 420 Software Design and 
Development 

Prerequisite: Senior C.S. 
Standing. This course will bring 
together ideas and skills learned 
in the preceding courses. It in- 
cludes methods for design, opti- 
mization and debugging, inter- 
facing with users and with the 
computing environment, and 
documentation. These issues are 
dealt with on a mature level in 
order to prepare students for fu- 
ture jobs. A large project will be 
designed and implemented by 
the class. 3 credit hours. 

CS 425 Principles of Computer 
Graphics 

Prerequisites: M 118 and ei- 
ther CS 224 or CS 226. Develop- 
ment and implementation of the 
fundamental algorithms of com- 
puter graphics. Topics covered 
will include 2-D viewing, geo- 
metric transformaHons, clip- 
ping, segmentation, curves, user 
interaction, and an introduction 
to 3-D viewing and surfaces. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 437 Data Base Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 337. The de- 
velopment capabilities and use 
of data-base systems; their bene- 
fits and costs. Overview of DB 
systems, major DB models, OB- 
MS-based database design. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 440 Programming 
Laboratory 

Laboratory course in which 
the students will write a series of 
programs under the guidance of 
a faculty member. The programs 
will be written in a currently 
standard systems programming 
language, such as C, FORTH or 
LISP. Programming assignments 
will be an extension of the course 
material of one of the junior/se- 
nior courses, and will provide an 
opportunity for students to 
apply the theory learned in these 
courses. Course can be taken re- 
peatedly, working in different 
languages or doing more ad- 
vanced projects. 1 credit hour. 



CS 447 Computer 
Communications 

Prerequisites: CS 106 and 
IE 346. Problems and solutions 
in designing a network of com- 
puters. Topics: ISO 7-level 
model, network topology, com- 
munications theory, protocols, 
virtual circuits and packet 
switching, local networks 
(CSMA, token ring), security 
(DES, Public Key Crypto-sys- 
tems), concurrency, distributed 
software. 3 credit hours. 

CS450-455 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 
An examination of new develop- 
ments or current practices in 
computer science. One topic will 
be selected for thorough study. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 478 Artificial 
Intelligence/LISP 

Prerequisite: CS 224 or CS 226. 
For computing majors. Objec- 
tives: to teach the concepts syn- 
tax and procedures of the LISP 
language and to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the present capabilit- 
ies of artificial intelligence. The 
course will investigate program- 
ming methodology pertinent to 
AI research. Topics: expert sys- 
tems, minimax searches, prun- 
ing techniques, production sys- 
tems, game trees. 3 credit hours. 

CS 480 Topics in Systems and 
Architecture 

Prerequisite: CS 320. A second 
course in operating systems and 
system architecture, covering 
advanced topics and new hard- 
ware and software develop- 
ments. Topics include: data com- 
pression, portable code, inter- 
process communication, net- 
work systems, hazards and pro- 
tection, I/O devices and optimi- 
zation, parallel architecture, and 
new developments. Each stu- 
dent will do library research on 
an assigned topic and make both 
written and oral presentations of 
his work. 3 credit hours. 



CS 504 Senior Project 

Prerequisite: senior status and 
permission of the department. 
The student, in conjunction with 
a faculty adviser, selects and 
works on a project. Work is pre- 
sented at a seminar at the end of 
the semester. 3 credit hours. 



Criminal Justice 

CJ 100-101 Introduction to 
Criminal Justice I and II 

Survey of criminal justice sys- 
tem with emphasis upon prose- 
cution, corrections and societal 
reaction to offenders. Retribu- 
tion, rehabilitation, deterrence, 
and incapacitation serve as ge- 
neric frames of reference and 
theoretical points of departure 
for analyzing the dispositional 
and correctional processes. 
Criminal Justice I focuses on the 
first half of the process — from 
prosecution through the courts; 
Criminal Justice 11 completes the 
cycle from the courts through the 
correctional system. 3 credit 
hours each. 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

The scope, purpose and defi- 
niHons of substantive criminal 
law: criminal liabihty, major ele- 
ments of statutory and common 
law offenses (with some refer- 
ence to the Connecticut Penal 
Code) and significant defenses. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

General survey of the major 
historical, legal and practical de- 
velopments and problems of se- 
curity. Course stresses the com- 
ponents, organization and 
objectives of security, the trend 
toward professionalization, the 
role of security in the public and 
private sectors and its relation- 
ship to management. 3 credit 
hours. 



188 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal 
Investigation 

Introduction to criminal inves- 
tigation in tbie field. Conducting 
the crime scene search, inter- 
view of witness, interrogation of 
suspects, methods of surveil- 
lance and the special techniques 
employed in particular kinds of 
investigation. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 203 Security Administration 

An overview of security sys- 
tems found in retail, industrial 
and governmental agencies, the 
legal framework for security op- 
erations, and the administrative 
and procedural processes in se- 
curity management. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 204 Forensic Photography 
with Laboratory 

Introduchon to basic tech- 
niques, material and other as- 
pects of crime scene photo- 
graphs. Theory and practice of 
photographic image formation 
and recordings. Laboratory exer- 
cises with emphasis on homi- 
cide, sex offenses, arson and ac- 
cident photograph techniques. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 205 Interpersonal Relations 

Prerequisite: P 111. Theories, 
conceptual models and research 
related to interpersonal rela- 
tions. Topics include reciprocal 
theory, attitudes and labeling 
theory. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 209 Correctional Treatment 
Programs 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101. 
Various treatment modalities 
employed in the rehabilitation of 
offenders. Field visits to various 
correctional treatment facilittes 
such as half-way houses and 
community-based treatment 
programs. 3 credit hours. 



CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic 
Science 

Prerequisite: CJ 201. A class- 
room lecture/discussion session 
and a laboratory period. Topics 
include the recognition, identifi- 
cation, individualization and 
evaluation of physical evidence 
such as hairs, fibers, chemicals, 
narcotics, blood, semen, glass, 
soil, fingerprints, documents, 
firearms and tool marks. Labora- 
tory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 217 Criminal Procedure I 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 102. An inquiry into the na- 
ture and scope of the U.S. Con- 
stitution as it relates to criminal 
procedures. Areas discussed in- 
clude the law of search and sei- 
zure arrests, confessions and 
identification. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II 
and Evidence 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 102, CJ 217. Legal doctrines, 
employed in controlling the suc- 
cessive stages of the criminal 
process. Rules of law related to 
wiretapping and lineups, pre- 
trial decision making, juvenile 
justice and trial. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 220 Legal Issues in 
Corrections 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 217, junior status. Examina- 
tion of the legal foundations of 
correctional practice and review 
of recent judicial decisions which 
are altering the correctional envi- 
ronment. An analysis of the fac- 
tors and forces which are creat- 
ing a climate of significant 
reform in corrections. 3 credit 
hours. 



CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
P 111, SO 113. Analysis of stages 
and decisions made at critical 
junctures of the juvenile justice 
process. Topics include an analy- 
sis of Supreme Court treatment 
of juvenile justice issues, and the 
ability of the juvenile justice sys- 
tem to respond to juvenile crime. 
Focus on the processing of juve- 
niles through the system, and 
the special problems unique to 
juvenile justice. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 226 Industrial Security 

Prerequisite: CJ 105. Concepts 
of security as it integrates with 
industrial management systems 
presented along with industrial 
security requirements and stan- 
dards, alarms and surveillance 
devices, animate security ap- 
proaches, costing, planning and 
engineering. Principles of sfety 
practices and regulations cov- 
ered, as well as fire prevention, 
property conservation, occupa- 
tional hazards and personal safe- 
guards. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 227 Fingerprints with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215. 
The genetics and mathematical 
theory relating to fingerprints, 
chemical and physical methods 
used in developing latent finger- 
prints, and major systems of fin- 
gerprint classification. Labora- 
tory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 300 History of Criminal 
Justice 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101. 
The development of the major 
C.J. elements including police, 
prisons, probation and parole. 
Significant historical events and 
philosophical postulates as they 
pertain to this development. 3 
credit hours. 



CJ 301 Group Dynamics in 
Criminal Justice 

Prerequisites: CJ 205, CJ 206, 
Pill. Analysis of theory and ap- 
plied methods in the area of 
group process. Focus on both in- 
dividual roles and group devel- 
opment as they relate to criminal 
justice issues. Experiential exer- 
cises are included. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 303-304 Forensic Science 
Laboratory I and II 

Prerequisite: CJ 215. Specific 
examination of topics and labo- 
ratory testing procedures intro- 
duced in CJ 215. In the class- 
room, laboratory procedures are 
outlined and discussed. Identifi- 
cation and individualization of 
evidence; casting of hairs and fi- 
bers for microscopic identifica- 
tion; electrophoretic separation 
of blood enzymes. Laboratory 
Fee. 3 credit hours each. 

CJ 306 Security Problems 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: CJ 105, CJ 203. 
An analysis of special problem 
areas including college and uni- 
versity campuses, hospitals, ho- 
tel/motels etc. Also, special prob- 
lems concerning computer 
protection, bank security, execu- 
tive personnel protection, credit 
cards, case law and legal aspects, 
control of proprietary informa- 
tion and white collar crime. 3 
credit hours. 

CJ 310 Criminal Justice 
Institutions 

Prerequisite: CJ 300. Exami- 
namination of the societal and 
psychological implications of 
various types of institutions. In- 
cludes both social and total insti- 
tutions and examines their simi- 
larities and dissimilarities with 
particular emphasis on their im- 
plications for criminal justice. 3 
credit hours. 



CJ 311 Criminology 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
P 111, SO 113. An examination 
of principles and concepts of 
criminal behavior; criminological 
theory; the nature, extent and 
distribution of crime; legal and 
societal reaction to crime. Same 
course as SO 311. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 333 Police Civil Liability 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 102, CJ 217 or permission of 
instructor. Introductory over- 
view of types of civil liability law- 
suits brought against law en- 
forcement officers. Exploration 
of ways to relieve the pressures 
of this potential liability. Empha- 
sis placed on negligence and in- 
tentional torts. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 400 Criminal Justice 
Problems Seminar 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 300. An examination of theo- 
retical and philosophical issues 
affecting the administration of 
justice: the problems of reconcil- 
ing legal and theoretical ideals in 
various sectors of the criminal 
justice system with the realities 
of practice. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 402 Police in Society 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 101, 
CJ 300. Acquaints students with 
the major developments and 
trends of policing in a free soci- 
ety. Emphasis placed on Ameri- 
can police and the role of the po- 
lice in a democracy. Further 
emphasis placed on the exami- 
nation of the interactions be- 
tween the police and the com- 
munities they serve. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 403 Advanced Forensic 
Science I 

In-depth examination of blood 
grouping procedures for red cell 
antigens, isoenzymes and serum 
proteins, identification and typ- 
ing of body fluids and their 
stains; collection, processing and 
handling of biological materials 
in casework. Laboratory Fee. 4 
credit hours. 



Courses 189 

CJ 404 Advanced Forensic 
Science II 

In-depth examination of sev- 
eral subjects in modern criminal- 
istics, including hair and fiber 
analysis and comparison, arson 
accelerants and explosives resi- 
dues, glass comparisons and fo- 
rensic chemistry. Laboratory 
Fee. 4 credit hours. 

CJ 408 Correctional Counseling I 

Prerequisites: P 111, P 336, 
CJ 205, CJ 209, CJ 301. Basic 
counseling and evaluation the- 
ory, methods, and research as 
applied to a correctional setting. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 409 Correctional 
Counseling II 

Prerequisite: CJ 408. Applica- 
tions of correctional counseling 
theory and methods. Includes 
interviewing techniques and 
case intervention strategies with 
offenders. Focuses predomi- 
nantly on one-to-one counseling 
situations. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 410 Legal Issues in 
Private Security 

Examines legal problems af- 
fecting the private security in- 
dustry and ways to prevent loss 
from litigation. Includes inten- 
tional torts, negligence, agency, 
contracts and law of arrest, 
search and seizure, and interro- 
gation by citizens. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 415 Crime Scene 
Investigation and Pattern 
Evidence 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215. 
A study of the methods and 
techniques of crime scene inves- 
tigation and documentation and 
physical evidence recognition 
and collection. 3 credit hours. 



190 

CJ 416 Seminar in Forensic 
Science 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215. 
An examination and evaluation 
of current issues in the law en- 
forcement science field. Course 
aids in understanding how vari- 
ous physical evidence can be uti- 
lized as an investigative tool. 
Also, a review of modern analyt- 
ical techniques and their applica- 
tion in law enforcement science. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 498 Research Project 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department chairman. The stu- 
dent carries out an original re- 
search project in a criminal jus- 
tice setting and reports the finds. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 501 Criminal Justice 
Internship 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department chairman. Moni- 
tored field experience with se- 
lected federal, state or local crim- 
inal justice agencies or forensic 
science laboratories subject to ac- 
ademic guidance and review. 3 
credit hours. 

CJ 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
departmental chairman. An op- 
portunity for the student, under 
the direction of a faculty mem- 
ber, to explore and acquire com- 
petence in a special area of inter- 
est. 1-3 credit hours. 



General Dietetics 
and Dietectic 
Technology 

DI 200 Volume Food Production 
and Service I 

Introduction to the fundamen- 
tal concepts, skills and tech- 
niques of basic food preparation 
and baking. Special emphasis is 
given to the study of ingredients, 
cooking theories, terminology, 
equipment, technology, weights 
and measures, formula conver- 
sion and procedures. Instruction 
will include: experimental 
hands-on preparation, demon- 
stration and lecture. Laboratory 
Fee. 3 credit hours. 

DI 214 Food Service 
Management Systems I 

Principles of meal planning 
and writing menus for volume 
food combinations, texture, 
color, nutrition and cooking 
methods. The interrelated steps 
involved in quantity food pro- 
duction, the delivery of food and 
the responsibilities of manage- 
ment along with the tools they 
use as administrators will be ex- 
plored. 3 credit hours. 

DI 216 Food Service 
Management Systems II 

Prerequisite: DI 214. Basic 
principles of food sanitation and 
work safety are stressed. The 
student will write policies and 
procedures and conduct an in- 
service training class for a food 
service facility in the hospitality 
field. Emphasis is placed on the 
causes and prevention of food 
poisoning and the moral and le- 
gal responsibilities of manage- 
ment to present safe and sanitary 
food to patrons. 3 credit hours. 



DI 218 Food Service 
Management Systems III 

Prerequisite: DI 214. Investi- 
gation of management problems 
associated with employee rela- 
tions in the hospitality field will 
be explored. Specific attention 
will be given to union activity in 
the hospitality industry. Case 
studies will be analyzed with re- 
gard to collective bargaining, 
grievance procedures, mediation 
and conciliation. 3 credit hours. 

DI 225 Nutrition Care I 

Prerequisite: BI 115. Examines 
current issues of food service 
management, health care man- 
agement, nutriHon, health of in- 
dividuals and the impact on nu- 
trition services in health care 
institutions. Discussion of the in- 
fluence of socioeconomic, cul- 
tural and psychological factors 
on food and nutrition behavior. 
Quality assurance, communica- 
tion skills, fundamentals of in- 
terviewing and counseling are 
overviewed. The student will be 
introduced to menu collection, 
menu modification and menu 
planning with consideration 
given to nutrient requirements 
for given stages of the life cycle. 
3 credit hours. 

DI 230 Dietetic Practice in 
Today's Society 

Prerequisite: BI 115. Introduc- 
tion to the nutrition/health team/ 
food service department respon- 
sibilities and interrelationships 
within an organization. Exam- 
ines current job trends, career 
opportunities, and community 
resources. Role delineation for 
health care professionals, legal 
and ethical aspects of practice are 
discussed. General concepts of 
computer utilization in food and 
nutrition service are covered and 
students participate in applica- 
tion of computer-assisted sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 



DI 350 Nutrition Care II 

Prerequisites: BI 115, BI 315, 
DI 225. Emphasizes quality as- 
surance throughout the food ser- 
vice supervisory/nutrition care 
process. Provides knowledge 
and demonstration of tech- 
niques and methods of teaching 
and counseling skills. Students 
work with patient/dietary as- 
sessment, planning, interven- 
tion and evaluation. Therapeutic 
diets and their application are 
covered. Medical terminology 
will be selected to provide a 
knowledge of terms related to 
selected clinical systems. 3 credit 
hours. 

DI 405 Nutrition Care III 

Prerequisites: BI 115, DI 225. 
Emphasizes tools for developing 
effective community nutrition 
services; looks at the organiza- 
tion and development of action 
plans for nutrihon services; de- 
velops knowledge of the funda- 
mentals of the political and legis- 
lative process and laws which 
affect dietetic practice. Discus- 
sion of nutritional problems that 
may be secondary to other 
health, social and economic in- 
fluences and which affect 
dietetic practice. 3 credit hours. 

DI 450-455 Special Studies 

Special topics in nutrition, 
health care, team concepts, 
foods, food service management 
and a variety of current issues in 
institution and community nu- 
trition care programs. Special- 
ized areas not available in the 
regular curriculum. 

DI 599 Independent Study 

Permission of the department 
chairman required. Independent 
research projects or other ap- 
proved phases of independent 
study. 3 credit hours. 



Economics 



EC 100 Economic History of 
the U.S. 

Development of American 
economic interachons in the var- 
ious stages of agriculture, trade, 
industry, finance and labor. 
Change of economic practices 
and institutions, particularly in 
business, banking and labor as 
well as the changing role of gov- 
ernment. 3 credit hours. 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

Foundations of economic anal- 
ysis, including economic prog- 
ress, resources, technology, pri- 
vate enterprise, profits and the 
price system. Macroeconomics 
including national income, em- 
ployment and economic growth. 
Price levels, money and bank- 
ing, the Federal Reserve System, 
theory of income, employment 
and prices, business cycles and 
problems of monetary, fiscal and 
stabilization policy. 3 credit 
hours. 

EC 134 Principles of 
Economics II 

Microeconomics including 
markets and market structure 
and the allocation of resources. 
The distribution of income, the 
public economy, the interna- 
tional economy and selected eco- 
nomic problems. 3 credit hours. 

EC 250 Economics and U.S. 
Industrial Competitiveness 

An examination of the free 
market and the most effective 
path to revitalizing the competi- 
tiveness of U.S. industry in 
world markets. Addressed are 
such key issues as government 
assistance to industries, regions 
and workers; regulation and an- 
titrust; dealing with interna- 
tional competition; and promot- 
ing trade in services. 3 credit 
hours. 



Courses 191 

EC 311 Government Regulation 
of Business 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
An appraisal of public policy to- 
ward transportation, trusts, 
monopolies, public utilities and 
other forms of government regu- 
lation of economic activity. 3 
credit hours. 

EC 312 Contemporary Economic 
Problems 

Selected current economic 
problems: inflation, unemploy- 
ment, poverty in an affluent soci- 
ety, economic issues in health 
services, the economics of higher 
education and the problems of 
the cities and population. Exami- 
nation and exploraHon of polic- 
ies to cure these problems. 3 
credit hours. 

EC 314 Public Finance and 
Budgeting 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
A general survey of government 
finance at the federal, state and 
local levels, including govern- 
ment expenditures, principles of 
taxation, public borrowing, debt 
management and fiscal policy for 
economic stabilization. 3 credit 
hours. 

EC 336 Money and Banking 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
Nature and funcHon of money, 
commercial banking system. 
Federal Reserve System and the 
Treasury, monetary theory, fi- 
nancial institutions, interna- 
tional financial relationships, 
history of money and monetary 
policy in the United States and 
current problems of monetary 
policy. 3 credit hours. 

EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
Study of commodity and factor 
pricing, theory of production, 
cost theory, market structures 
under perfect and imperfect 
market conditions. 3 credit 
hours. 



192 



EC 341 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134, 
A 111. An investigation of the 
makeup of the national income 
and an analysis of the factors 
that enter into its determination. 
The roles of consumption, in- 
vestment, government finance 
and money influencing national 
income and output, employ- 
ment, the price level and rate of 
growth and policies for eco- 
nomic stability and growth. 3 
credit hours. 

EC 342 International Economics 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
The role, importance and cur- 
rents of international commerce; 
the balance of international pay- 
ments; foreign exchange and in- 
ternational finance; international 
trade theory; problems of pay- 
ments adjustment; trade restric- 
tions; economic development 
and foreign aid. 3 credit hours. 

EC 350 Economics of Labor 
Relations 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
History of the union movement 
in the United States, union struc- 
ture and government, problems 
of collective bargaining, eco- 
nomics of the labor market, wage 
theories, unemployment, gov- 
ernmental policy and control 
and problems of employment se- 
curity. 3 credit hours. 

EC 420 Applied Economic 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
A study of applied economics in- 
volves application of the tools of 
economic analysis to the real-life 
problems of business firms, gov- 
ernment agencies and other or- 
ganizations. 3 credit hours. 

EC 440 Economic Development 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
Economic problems of develop- 
ing countries and the policies 
necessary to induce growth. In- 
dividual projects required. 3 
credit hours. 



EC 442 Economic Thought 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
The development of economic 
doctrine from mercantilism and 
Adam Smith to Marx and to the 
thinking of modern-day theo- 
rists, such as Friedman, Cal- 
braith, Schumpeter and Debreu. 
Emphasis upon the main cur- 
rents of thought with the appli- 
cability to present day problems. 
Individual study and reporting. 
3 credit hours. 

EC 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department chairman. Indepen- 
dent research projects or other 
approved forms of independent 
study. 3 credit hours. 



Electrical 
Engineering 

EE 201 Basic Circuits I 

Prerequisites: M 117; corequi- 
sites: CS 102, M 118, PH 205. 
Energy effects and ideal circuit 
elements, independent and de- 
pendent sources; Coulomb's 
Law, Ohm's Law and Kirch- 
hoff's Laws; resistive networks; 
node and mesh analysis; Theve- 
nin and Norton Theorems, anal- 
ysis of first order networks; D.C. 
and transient analysis using 
SPICE. 3 credit hours. 

EE 202 Basic Circuits II 

Prerequisite: EE 201. Contin- 
uation of EE 201. Natural and 
forced response of second order 
RLC networks; transfer func- 
tions; initial conditions and com- 
plete responses; design and 
analysis of RLC networks with 
step, exponential, sinusoidal 
and impulse exciHng funcHons 
using SPICE. Sinusoidal steady 
state techniques, complex trans- 
fer functions, phasor analysis 
and phasor diagrams; energy, 
power, power factor, complex 
power, PLMS values. AC network 
analysis using SPICE. 3 credit 
hours. 



EE 211 Principles of Electrical 
Engineering I 

Prerequisite: M 117; corequi- 
sites: PH 205, M 118. Analysis of 
DC circuits; Kirchhoff's Laws, 
circuit elements, node and loop 
analysis, instruments and mea- 
surement techniques. Equiva- 
lent circuits, superposition, and 
power calculations. Sinusoidal 
and periodic signals, frequency 
response; impedance and phas- 
or analysis. Transient and com- 
plete responses of first order net- 
works. Analog building blocks, 
the ideal operational amplifier, 
op-amp circuits. This course is 
intended for non-electrical engi- 
neering majors. 3 credit hours. 

EE 212 Principles of Electrical 
Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 211. Continu- 
ation of EE 211. Transient and 
complete responses of second 
order networks. Digital signals, 
boolean algebra, logic gates, flip- 
flops. Introduction to digital sys- 
tems, shift register, storage reg- 
ister, counters, A/D and D/A 
converters. Semiconductor de- 
vices, diodes, transistors, ampli- 
fiers. Electric power, transform- 
ers, power calculations; electric 
machines. This course is in- 
tended for non-electrical engi- 
neering majors. 3 credit hours. 

EE 253 Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory I 

Prerequisite: EE 202 (may be 
taken concurrently). Laboratory 
exercises and projects including 
resistance, capacitance and in- 
ductance measurement, diode, 
transistor and operational ampli- 
fier characteristics. Digital cir- 
cuits measurement of electrical 
parameters. Characteristics and 
applications of basic electrical 
laboratory apparatus. Labora- 
tory Fee. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 193 



EE 255 Digital Systems I 

Fundamental concepts of digi- 
tal systems. Binary numbers. 
Boolean algebra, combinational 
logic design using gates, map 
minimization techniques. Use of 
modular MSI components such 
as adders, multiplexers, etc.; 
Analysis and design of simple 
synchronous sequential circuits, 
including flip-flops, shift regis- 
ters and counters. 3 credit hours. 

EE 301 Network Analysis 

Prerequisite: EE 202. Network 
analysis techniques for A.C. 
steady state, phasor diagrams, 
power, energy, RMS and aver- 
age values. Power measure- 
ment, parallel loads and power 
factor improvement, single 
phase transmission system de- 
sign and analysis, three-phase 
systems, armature winding de- 
sign. Transfer functions, pole- 
zero diagrams, frequency re- 
sponse, filter design, resonance, 
bandwidth and quality factor. 
Mutual inductance, ideal trans- 
former, two-port networks. Use 
of SPICE and FORTRAN pro- 
grams in analysis and design. 3 
credit hours. 

EE 302 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisite: EE 301 and M 
204. Continuous and discrete 
signals, difference equations. 
The convolution sum and inte- 
gral. The Laplace Transform; the 
Z transform. Fourier series and 
Fourier transform. Spectral anal- 
ysis of signals. 3 credit hours. 



EE 341 Numerical Methods in 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: M 204 and a 
programming language, e.g., 
FORTRAN/PASCAL, etc. Topics 
include: solutions of algebraic 
and transcendental equations by 
iterative methods; system of lin- 
ear equations (matrix inversion, 
etc.); interpolation, numerical 
differentiation and integration; 
solution of ordinary differential 
equations. Scientific and engi- 
neering applications. 3 credit 
hours. (This course is cross listed 
with M 338 Numerical Analysis.) 

EE 344 Electrical Machines 

Prerequisite: EE 301 . Magnetic 
fields and magnetic circuits, 
forces and torques. Theory, 
characteristics, operation, test- 
ing, equivalent circuits, design 
concepts and applications of di- 
rect current and alternating cur- 
rent machines including trans- 
formers, synchronous and 
induction machinery. Design of 
main dimensions of transformer 
cores, rotors and stators and ar- 
mature windings. 3 credit hours. 

EE 347 Electronics I 

Prerequisite: EE 202. Funda- 
mental principles and applica- 
tions of electronic devices and 
circuits using diodes, bi-polar 
transistors and FET's. Analysis 
and design limited to single 
stage circuits. Applications to 
analog systems with an intro- 
ductory discussion of digital cir- 
cuits. 3 credit hours. 

EE 348 Electronics II 

Prerequisite: EE 347. Princi- 
ples and applications of analog 
circuits at a more advanced level 
using bi-polar and FET devices. 
Small signal analysis and design 
using hybrid models including 
both single stage and multistage 
amplifiers at high and low fre- 
quencies and difference amplifi- 
ers. 3 credit hours. 



EE 349 Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory II 

Prerequisite: EE 348 (may be 
taken concurrently). Laboratory 
exercises and design projects 
intended to give the student 
practical experience in BJT and 
FET single and multiple stage 
amplifier design. Experiments 
also include diode circuits, 
power amplifiers and differential 
amplifiers. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 

EE 356 Digital Systems II 

Prerequisites: EE 255 and 
EE 371 or equivalent. Course fo- 
cuses on sequential logic design. 
Both synchronous and asyn- 
chronous techniques are covered 
with an emphasis on controller- 
based modular design. Ad- 
vanced topics will be covered as 
time permits. Course includes 
laboratory activity. 3 credit 
hours. 

EE 371 Computer Engineering 

Prerequisites: CS 102, EE 255. 
Introduction to the architecture 
of digital computers. Stored pro- 
gram concept, instruction pro- 
cessing, memory organization, 
instruction formats, addressing 
modes, instruction sets, assem- 
bler and machine language pro- 
gramming. Input/Output pro- 
gramming. Direct memory 
access. Bus structures and con- 
trol signals. Course includes lab- 
oratory activity. 3 credit hours. 

EE 420 Random Signal Analysis 

Prerequisite: EE 302. The ele- 
ments of probability theory. 
Continuous and discrete ran- 
dom variables. Characteristic 
functions and central limit theo- 
rem. Stationary random pro- 
cesses, auto correlation, cross 
correlation. Power density spec- 
trum of a stationary random pro- 
cess. Systems analysis with ran- 
dom signals. 3 credit hours. 



194 



EE 437 Industrial Power 
Systems Engineering 

Prerequisite: EE 301. Study of 
the components forming a 
power system, three-phase sys- 
tems, transmission line model- 
ing and design, per unit quanti- 
ties, modeling of power systems, 
one-line diagrams, symmetrical 
components, sequence networks 
and unsymmetrical fault calcula- 
tions, matrices and matrix alge- 
bra. 3 credit hours. 

EE 438 Electric Power 
Transmission 

Prerequisite: EE 437. Power 
system modeling for fault analy- 
sis using sequence networks, 
bus impedance matrix formula- 
tion, rake equivalent method, 
fault analysis by computer meth- 
ods, transmission line ABCD pa- 
rameters and distributed param- 
eter analysis, design and 
performance using computers, 
load flow analysis, Gauss-Siedel 
method, Newton-Raphson 

method, economic load sharing, 
stability. Design and analysis 
using computers and FORTRAN 
programs. 3 credit hours. 

EE 439 Electric Power 
Distribution 

Prerequisites: EE 344, EE 437. 
Structure of electric power distri- 
bution, distribution transform- 
ers, sub-transmission lines, sub- 
stations, bus schemes, primary 
and secondary systems, radial 
and loop feeder designs, voltage 
drop and regulation, capacitors, 
power factor correction and volt- 
age regulation, protection buses, 
automatic reclosures and coordi- 
nation. 3 credit hours. 



EE 445 Communications 
Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 302. The anal- 
ysis and design of communica- 
tion systems. Signal analysis, 
transmission of signals, power 
density spectra, amplitude, fre- 
quency and pulse modulation; 
pulse code modulation; digital 
signal transmission. Perfor- 
mance of communications sys- 
tems and signal to noise ratio. 3 
credit hours. 

EE 446 Digital Electronic 
Circuits 

Prerequisite: EE 348. Analysis 
and design of digital circuit 
classes (comparators and logical 
gates) by application of Ebers- 
MoU transistor model (satura- 
tion/active/cutoff regions). Com- 
parators treated as overdriven 
differential/operational amplifi- 
ers, including bistable Schmitt 
trigger. Gates treated for major 
technologies: resistor-tftnsistor 
logic (RTL); transistor-transistor 
logic (TTL); and emitter-coupled 
logic (ECL). Related integrated 
circuit analysis including inter- 
nal variables and l-O characteris- 
tics. 3 credit hours. 

EE 450 Analog Filter Design 

Prerequisite: EE 301. Tech- 
niques in the analysis and design 
of active networks. First order 
active networks. Second order 
analog filters. Design of Butter- 
worth, Chebyshev, Bessel- 
Thomson and Cauer lowpass 
filters. Lowpass to bandpass, 
bandstop and highpass filter 
transformations and sensitivity 
analysis. 3 credits. 



EE 452 Digital Filter Design 

Prerequisite: EE 302. Tech- 
niques in the analysis and design 
of digital filters. Digital filter ter- 
minology and frequency re- 
sponse. FIR filter design. IIR dig- 
ital filter design including 
Butterworth and Chebyshev 
lowpass, highpass, bandpass, 
and bandstop filters. The DFT 
and IDFT. FFT algorithms. 3 
credit hours. 

EE 455 Control Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 302. The 
modeling of linear and nonlinear 
physical systems with discrete 
and continuous state space equa- 
tions. Solutions to the discrete 
and continuous linear state 
equation; state transition matri- 
ces; phase variable forms; Eigen- 
values and Eigenvectors; Jordan 
Canonical form. Controllability 
and observability of discrete and 
continuous systems. Relation- 
ships between controllability, 
observability and transfer func- 
tions. The stability of discrete 
and continuous linear systems, 
Liapunov, root locus, Nyquist, 
feedback; PID control; Lead-lag 
control. 3 credit hours. 

EE 457 Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory III 

Prerequisite: EE 349 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Design 
projects from electrical power 
systems, communications sys- 
tems, control systems, micro- 
waves, analog and digital elec- 
tronics and digital circuits. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 195 



EE 458 Electrical Engineering 
Design Laboratory 

A laboratory course required 
of all BSEE candidates. The stu- 
dent selects a sub-area of electri- 
cal engineering and devotes the 
entire semester to laboratory de- 
sign activities under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty member. This 
course provides the student with 
experience at a professional level 
with engineering projects that 
involve analysis, design, con- 
struction of prototypes and eval- 
uation of results. At the present 
time design laboratory activity 
includes: 

Communications/Signal Process 
Laboratory. Prerequisite: EE 
445 or EE 450 or EE 452. 
Control Systems Laboratory. 

Prerequisite: EE 455. 
Digital Design Laboratory. Pre- 
requisite: EE 356. 
Fiber Optics/Microwave Labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: EE 462 or EE 
480. 
Machines/Power Systems Labo- 
ratory. Prerequisites: EE 344, 
EE 437. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

EE 461 Electromagnetic Theory 

Prerequisites: M 203, PH 205. 
Basic electromagnetic theory in- 
cluding staHc fields of electric 
charges and the magnetic fields 
of steady electric currents. Fun- 
damental field laws including 
Coulomb's Law, Gauss' Law, 
Biot-Savart's Law and Ampere's 
Law. Maxwell's equations, sca- 
lar and vector potentials, La- 
place's equation and boundary 
conditions. Magnetization, po- 
larization. 3 credit hours. 

EE 462 Electromagnetic Waves 

Prerequisite: EE 461. Electro- 
magnetic wave propagarion and 
reflection in various structures, 
including coaxial, two-wire and 
waveguide systems. Transmis- 
sion lines. Various modes of 
propagation in rectangular 
waveguides. The dipole an- 
tenna. Linear antenna arrays. 3 
credit hours. 



EE 465 Physical Electronics 

Prerequisite: EE 347. Princi- 
ples and operation of semicon- 
ductor devices from the view- 
point of physical and internal 
characteristics. The course in- 
cludes semiconductor LED's and 
lasers, microwave devices and 4 
element semiconductor devices 
in general. The discussions ex- 
tend to the design of VLSI chips 
from the LSI level. 3 credit 
hours. 

EE 472 Computer Architecture 

Prerequisites: EE 255, EE 371 
or equivalent. Computer de- 
scription languages; memory 
and I/O subsystems; survey of 
conventional and modern archi- 
tectures; hardware support of 
system software; other advanced 
topics. 3 credit hours. 

EE 475 Microprocessor Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 371. Micro- 
processors and their peripheral 
devices. Hardware and software 
aspects of interfacing. Micro- 
processor-based system design. 
Introduction to advanced topics 
such as data communications, 
memory management and mul- 
tiprocessing, as time permits. 
The course is structured around 
laboratory excercises. 3 credit 
hours. 

EE 480 Fiber Optic 
Communications 

Prerequisite: EE 461. The fun- 
damentals of lightwave technol- 
ogy, optical fibers, LED's and 
lasers, signal degradation in op- 
tical fibers. Photodetectors, 
power launching and coupling, 
connectors and splicing tech- 
niques. Transmission link analy- 
sis. This course will include se- 
lected laboratory experiments. 3 
credit hours. 

EE 500 Special Topics in 
Electrical Engineering 

Prerequisite: Instructor's con- 
sent. Special topics in the field of 
electrical engineering. 3 credit 
hours. 



EE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Consent of fac- 
ulty supervisor and approval of 
department chairman. (Refer to 
academic regulations for inde- 
pendent study.) Independent 
study provides the opportunity 
to explore an area of special in- 
terest under faculty supervision. 
May be repeated. 3 credit hours. 



Engineering Science 

ES 103 Technology in Modem 
Society 

Scientific and technological 
developments and their implica- 
tions for the future of society. 
Prospects and problems in com- 
munications, energy sources, 
automation, transportation and 
other technologies. Use and con- 
trol of technological resources 
for public benefit. 3 credit hours. 

ES 107 Introduction to 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: M 115 (may be 
taken concurrently). Overview 
of the problems, perspectives 
and methods of the engineering 
profession. Modeling of real 
world problems for purposes of 
optimization, decision making 
and design. Practical techniques 
of problem formulation and 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

ES 415 Professional Engineering 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: senior status. 
Discussion of topics on profes- 
sional engineering and ethical 
matters pertaining to the practice 
of engineering. This course in- 
tended for non-civil engineering 
majors. Civil engineering majors 
take CE 407. 1 credit hour. 



196 



English 



Note: E 105 and E 110 are required 
by all departments in the university 
and must be taken during the stu- 
dent's first year at the university. 
They are also prerequisites for all up- 
per-level English courses. Students 
who fail the Writing Proficiency Ex- 
amination may be helped by enroll- 
ing in E 250 and/or utilizing the 
Center for Learning Resources. 

E 101 Reading Strategies 

Reading, analyzing, and inter- 
preting non-fiction for the pur- 
pose of learning to comprehend 
textbooks. 1 credit hour. Labora- 
tory Fee. 

E 103 Fundamentals 

Designed to increase aware- 
ness of the structure of English. 
Intensive practice in writing to 
improve the student's ability to 
construct effective sentences, 
paragraphs, and short themes. 3 
excess credit hours, 6 class hours 
per week. See section. Develop- 
mental Studies program. 

E 104 Fundamentals 

For international students. 
Same course descriphon as for 
E 103. 

E 105 Composition 

Prerequisite: satisfactory grade 
on English placement test or 
E 103. Analytical study of essays 
for the purpose of improving 
skills of written communication. 
Practice in writing in a variety of 
rhetorical modes with emphasis 
upon clarity and precision. 3 
credit hours. 

E 106 Composition 

For international students. 
Same course description as for 
E105. 



E 110 Composition and 
Literature 

Prerequisite: E 105 or place- 
ment by the English department. 
Reading, analyzing, and inter- 
preting literature in three basic 
genres: fiction, poetry and 
drama. Writing of analytical and 
critical essays. Theater fee for 
day sections. 3 credit hours. 

E 111 Composition and 
Literature 

For international students. 
Same course description as for 
EllO. 

E 114 Oral Exposition 

A disciplined approach to oral 
communication for freshmen. 
Objectives are to develop profi- 
ciency in locating, organizing 
and presenting material and to 
help the student gain confidence 
and fluency in speaking extem- 
poraneously. Students beyond 
the freshman year should take 
E 230. 3 credit hours. 

E 201 Literary Heritage 

Selected translations of prose, 
poetry and drama from Homer 
through the Renaissance. 3 
credit hours. 

E 202 Modem Literature 

Selected translations of prose, 
poetry and drama from the sev- 
enteenth century to the present. 
3 credit hours. 

E 211 Early British Writers 

A study of important British 
writers from the beginning of lit- 
erature in English through the 
Neoclassic era. 3 credit hours. 

E 212 Modem British 
Writers 

A study of important British 
writers from the Romantic era to 
the present. 3 credit hours. 



E 213 Early American 
Writers 

A study of important Ameri- 
can writers from Colonial times 
to the 1850s. 3 credit hours. 

E 214 Modern American 
Writers 

A study of important Ameri- 
can writers from the 1860s to the 
present. 3 credit hours. 

E 220 Writing for Business and 
Industry 

Prerequisite: E 105. Intensive 
practice in the various types of 
writing required of executives, 
businessmen, engineers and 
other professionals, with em- 
phasis on business letters, 
memos, resumes, internal and 
external reports, evaluations and 
recommendations, descriptions 
of procedures and processes. 3 
credit hours. 

E 225 Technical Writing 
and Presentation 

Intensive practice in the com- 
mon forms of technical writing, 
with emphasis on technical de- 
scription, processes, reports and 
manuals. Oral presentation of 
written work. 3 credit hours. 

E 230 Public Speaking and 
Group Discussion 

Objectives are to develop pro- 
ficiency in organizing and pre- 
senting material, and to give 
practice in speaking, group in- 
teraction, conference manage- 
ment and small group discus- 
sion. 3 credit hours. 

E 250 Expository Writing 

Intensive practice in writing 
that explains. Emphasis on gath- 
ering information, establishing 
credibility, and attaining clarity, 
coherence and point. 3 credit 
hours. 



E 260 The Short Story 

A critical study of the best sto- 
ries of American and British writ- 
ers as well as stories, in transla- 
hon, of writers of other 
nationalities. 3 credit hours. 

E 261 The Essay 

Writing of several types of es- 
says: study of contemporary es- 
says and great essays of the past. 
ParHcular attenrion paid to orga- 
nization, methods of develop- 
ment and style. 3 credit hours. 

E 267 Creative Writing I 

Imaginative exploration of 
both prose and verse; practice in 
writing various short forms of 
each; particular attention to con- 
crete imagery, clarity of thought 
and the development of style. 3 
credit hours. 

E 268 Creative Writing II 

Emphasis on the elements of 
short fiction and drama; second- 
ary attention to related forms. 3 
credit hours. 

E 281 Science Fiction 

A survey of the development 
of science fiction during the 
nineteenth and twentieth centu- 
ries. Reading of American, En- 
glish and European science fic- 
tion novels and short stories. 3 
credit hours. 

E 290 The Bible as Literature 

A study of literary genres in 
the Bible: narrative, drama, po- 
etry, wisdom literature, books of 
prophecy, letters. Extensive 
readings in both the Old and 
New Testaments. Emphasis on 
the King James version, the "no- 
blest monument of English 
prose." 3 credit hours. 

E 323 The Renaissance in 
England 

Major writers of the English 
Renaissance, including Sidney, 
Spenser, Donne and Milton. 3 
credit hours. 



E 341 Shakespeare 

An analysis of representative 
tragedies, comedies and history 
plays. 3 credit hours. 

E 353 Literature of the 
Romantic Era 

Poetry and prose of the major 
Romantics — Wordsworth, Cole- 
ridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, 
Lamb and Hazlitt — with atten- 
tion given to the milieu of the 
writers, the Continental back- 
ground and theories of Romanti- 
cism. 3 credit hours. 

E 356 Victorian Literature 

Poetry and prose from 1830- 
1900. The works of Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Mill, 
Newman, Ruskin and others 
studied in the light of the social, 
political and religious problems 
of the period. 3 credit hours. 

E 371 Literature of the 
Neoclassic Era 

British writers of the period 
1660-1789, with emphasis upon 
Dryden, Pope, Swift and John- 
son. 3 credit hours. 

E 390 The Novel in English 

Great novels written in En- 
glish (with the exception of 
American novels, which are 
studied in American literature 
courses). 3 credit hours. 

E 392 Foe, Hawthorne and 
Melville 

A study of the poetry and fic- 
tion of the major representatives 
of the tragic outlook on life in 
mid-nineteenth century Ameri- 
can literature. Poe, Hawthorne 
and Melville. 3 credit hours. 

E 395 American Realism and 
Naturalism 

Readings in the works of such 
major realists as Howells, Twain 
and James and important natu- 
ralist successors such as Frank 
Norris, Stephen Crane and The- 
odore Dreiser. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 197 

E 406-409 International 
Literature 

Selected poetry, drama and 
fiction, in translation, from one 
of the following nations: Russia, 
France, Germany, Spain, Japan 
or India. Topic to be announced 
for each semester. 3 credit hours 
each course. 

E 477 American Literature 
Between World Wars 

A study of the achievements of 
the main figures of the heroic 
generation that flourished be- 
tween the two world wars and 
brought about "America's Com- 
ing of Age." Poets Ezra Pound, 
T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace 
Stevens and William Carlos Wil- 
liams; novelists Hemingway, 
Faulkner, Fitzgerald. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 478 Contemporary American 
Literature 

Intensive study of recent 
American fiction, non-fiction, 
poetry and drama. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 480 Internship 

A work experience, arranged 
through the department, that 
will require the effective use of 
written or spoken English. 3 
credit hours. 

E 481-498 Studies in Literature 

Special topics in literature, 
which may include a concentra- 
tion upon a single figure, a 
group of writers or a literary 
theme. 3 credit hours each 



E 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of the 
instructor and the chairman of 
the department; restricted to 
juniors and seniors who have at 
least a 3.0 quality point ratio. 
Opportunity for the student un- 
der the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of in- 
terest. This course must be initi- 
ated by the student. 1-3 credit 
hours per semester. 



198 



Finance 



FI 113 Business Finance 

Prerequisites: A 102 or All, 
EC 134, QA 128. An introduc- 
tion to the principles of financial 
management and the impact of 
the financial markets and institu- 
tions on that managerial func- 
tion. An analytical emphasis will 
be placed upon the tools and 
techniques of the investment, fi- 
nancing and dividend decision. 
In addition, the institutional as- 
pects of financial markets, in- 
cluding a description of financial 
instruments, will be developed. 
3 credit hours. 

FI 214 Principles of Real Estate 

Prerequisite: FI 113. An intro- 
duction to the fundamentals of 
real estate practice and the es- 
sentials of the various aspects of 
the real estate business. Empha- 
sis will be placed on brokerage, 
mortgage financing, invest- 
ments, management and valua- 
tion relative to commercial and 
industrial real estate. 3 credit 
hours. 

FI 227 Risk and Insurance 

Prerequisite: FI 113. An exam- 
ination and evaluation of risk in 
business affairs and the appro- 
priate methods for handling 
them from the viewpoint of the 
business firm. Emphasis will be 
placed on, and extended consid- 
eration devoted to, the various 
forms of insurance coverage. 3 
credit hours. 



FI 229 Corporate Financial 
Management 

Prerequisites: FI 113, QA 216. 
A comprehensive analysis of the 
structure of optimal decisions 
relative to the functional areas of 
corporate financial decision 
making. Emphasis is placed 
upon developing an under- 
standing of the applications and 
limitations of decision models 
for the investment, financing 
and dividend decisions of the 
corporation. Topics include: firm 
valuation, capital budgeting, 
risk analysis, cost of capital, capi- 
tal structure and working capital 
management. 3 credit hours. 

FI 230 Investment Analysis and 
Management 

Prerequisites: FI 113, QA 216. 
An analysis of the determinants 
of valuation for common stocks, 
preferred stocks, bonds, con- 
vertible bonds and preferred 
stock, stock warrant and puts 
and calls. Emphasis will be 
placed on the analytical tech- 
niques of security analysis, port- 
folio analysis and portfolio selec- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

FI 325 International Finance 

Prerequisite: FI 113. An intro- 
duction to the theory and deter- 
mination of foreign exchange 
rates, mechanisms of adjust- 
ment to balance of payments dis- 
turbance, fixed vs. flexible ex- 
change rates. The international 
reserve supply mechanism and 
proposals for reform of the inter- 
national monetary system. 3 
credit hours. 

FI 341 Financial Decision 
Making 

Prerequisites: FI 229, FI 230, 
QA 333. An examination of the 
conceptual foundations underly- 
ing portfolio theory, capital mar- 
ket theory and firm financial de- 
cision making. Emphasis will be 
placed on an integrated analysis 
of firm financial decision making 
under varying conditions of cer- 
tainty and capital market perfec- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 



FI 345 Financial Institutions and 
Markets 

Prerequisites: FI 113, QA 216. 
An examination of the relation- 
ship between the financial sys- 
tem and the level, growth and 
stability of economic activity. 
Emphasis will be placed upon 
the theory, structure and regula- 
tion of financial markets and in- 
stitutions, coupled with the role 
of capital market yields as the 
mechanism that allocates sav- 
ings to economic investment. 3 
credit hours. 



Fine & Applied Art 

(See Art) 



Fire Science 



FS 105 Municipal Fire 
Administration 

Delineates the fire safety prob- 
lem, explores accepted adminis- 
trative methods for getting work 
done, covers financial considera- 
tions, personnel management, 
fire insurance rates, water sup- 
ply, buildings and equipment, 
distribution of forces, communi- 
cations, legal considerations, fire 
prevention, fire investigation, 
and records and reports. De- 
signed for individuals involved 
in either public or private fire 
protection systems as well as 
those in safety or insurance. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 106 Fire Strategy and Tactics 

A study of the responsibilities 
and operating modes of officers 
commanding fire department 
units, including engine, ladder 
and rescue companies. Initial 
evaluation of the problems con- 
fronting first arriving units. Out- 
line of particular problems en- 
countered in various types of 
occupancies and buildings. 
Stress on safety of the operating 
forces as well as of the public. 
Standpipe and sprinkler system 
utilization. Overhauling opera- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 199 



FS 201 Essentials of Fire 
Chemistry with Laboratory 

The examination of the chemi- 
cal requirements for combus- 
tion, the chemistry of fuels and 
explosive mixtures and the study 
of the various methods of stop- 
ping combustion. Analysis of the 
properHes of materials affecting 
fire behavior. Detailed examina- 
tion of the basic properties of 
fire. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 

FS 202 Principles of Fire Science 
Technology 

Introduction to the science of 
public fire protection. Review of 
the role, history and philosophy 
of fire service in the United 
States. Includes career orienta- 
tion and discussion of current 
and future problems in public 
fire protection. 3 credit hours. 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire 
Prevention 

The fundamentals of fire loss, 
codes, standards, laws, engi- 
neering, chemistry and physics 
related to fire protection and pre- 
vention. Fire inspection prac- 
tices and procedures. Fire and 
safety problems involved in stor- 
age and handling of specific haz- 
ardous materials. 3 credit hours. 

FS 208 Instructor Methodology 

A study of the methods and 
techniques of teaching fire safety 
and security to public safety and 
industrial employees. The use 
and development of visual aids. 
Actual teaching demonstrations 
and practice. 3 credits. 

FS 301 Building Construction 
Codes and Standards 

The various types of construc- 
tion materials and their proper- 
ties with emphasis on the effect 
of heat, water, and internal pres- 
sures generated under fire con- 
ditions. Familiarization with 
national, state, and local ordi- 
nances and codes which influ- 
ence the fire protection field. 3 
credit hours. 



FS 302 Chemistry of Hazardous 
Materials 

Prerequisite: FS 201. Study of 
the basic properties of hazardous 
materials and appropriate han- 
dling methods. Chemical reac- 
tions, toxicity, oxidation, pro- 
cess of explosives, plastics, 
resins, and fibers will be ex- 
plained. 3 credit hours. 

FS 303 Fire Protection Fluids and 
Systems 

Prerequisite: FS 202. Chemical 
and physical properties of fluids 
used in fire suppression sys- 
tems. Design of water supplies 
and distribution systems for fire 
protection. Fundamentals of au- 
tomatic sprinkler systems. Study 
of operational and hydraulics 
problems. 3 credit hours. 

FS 303L Fire Protection 
Hydraulic Design Laboratory 

Corequisite: FS 303. Design 
and review process of complex, 
hydraulically designed fire pro- 
tection and automatic sprinkler 
systems. Laboratory Fee. 1 cred- 
it hour 

FS 304 Fire Detection and 
Control 

Prerequisite: FS 202. Heat, 
sensitivity, thermostats, fusible 
elements, fire detection systems, 
designs and layouts, alarm sys- 
tems, power sources, safe- 
guards, municipal alarm sys- 
tems, construction, installation 
and maintenance requirements, 
standards and codes are all stud- 
ied in this course. Automatic fire 
suppression system, design and 
layout. 3 credit hours. 

FS 304L Fire Alarm/Detection 
Circuits Laboratory 

Corequisite: FS 304. Electrical 
circuitry as applied to fire alarm/ 
detection systems; direct experi- 
ence with, and review processes 
for, various panels and detec- 
tors; advantages and disadvan- 
tages of open vs. closed circuits; 
methods of overcoming circuit 
disadvantages. Laboratory Fee. 
1 credit hour 



FS 306 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance 

Examines the institution of fire 
insurance in the United States 
since it is the primary means of 
minimizing the economic conse- 
quences of property fire damage. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 308 Industrial Fire 
Protection I 

A study of fire hazards and po- 
tential fire causes in business 
and industry. Critical analysis of 
private protection measures 
available to reduce loss poten- 
tial. 3 credits. (Cross listed with 
SH 308 on page 217.) 

FS 309 Indush-ial Fire 
Protection II 

Prerequisite: FS 308. An explo- 
ration of management and orga- 
nizational principles with em- 
phasis on industrial fire, fire 
brigades, equipment and OSHA 
regulations dealing with indus- 
try. 3 credit hours. (Cross listed 
with SH 309 on pg. 217.) 

FS 325 Fire/Life Safety Codes 

Study of NFPA-101, Life 
Safety Code in depth along with 
the various occupancies in- 
volved within structures. Appli- 
cation of this and other applica- 
ble codes emphasized. Building 
codes and other reference codes 
discussed. 3 credit hours. 

FS 350 Fire Hazards Analysis 

Prerequisites: FS 301, FS 303, 
FS 304. Course covers the appli- 
cation of systems analysis, prob- 
ability, engineering economy 
and risk management concepts 
to the fire problem. Various 
types of building construction 
and materials will be evaluated 
as well as the fire detection and 
suppression system designed to 
protect the structures. System 
reliability will be considered 
along with the study of fire 
spread through a building. 3 
credit hours. 



200 

FS 402 Arson Investigation I 

Analysis of incendiary fire in- 
vestigations from the viewpoint 
of the field investigator with em- 
phasis on the value of various 
aids and techniques in the detec- 
tion of arson, collection and 
preservation of evidence, inves- 
tigation, interrogation, related 
laws of arson, court appear- 
ances, and testimony. There will 
be a discussion of case study 
illustrations. 3 credit hours. 

FS 403 Process and 
Transportation Hazards 

Prerequisite: FS 202. Special 
hazards of industrial processing, 
manufacturing and transporta- 
tion of products. Analytical ap- 
proach to hazard evaluation and 
control. Reduction of fire haz- 
ards in manufacturing pro- 
cesses. 3 credit hours. 

FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

Prerequisite: FS 202. Types of 
industrial processes requiring 
special fire protection treatment 
such as heating equipment, 
flammable liquids, gases and 
dusts. Emphasis on fundamen- 
tal theories involved, inspection 
methods, determination of rela- 
tive hazard, application of codes 
and standards and economics of 
installed protection systems. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 405 Fireground Management 

Prerequisite: FS 106. A study 
of the effective management of 
suppression forces at various fire 
situations. Includes consider- 
ation of pre-fire planning, prob- 
lem identification and solution 
implementation. Case studies of 
actual and theoretical fire inci- 
dents, command control con- 
cepts, maximum utilization of 
forces available, priorities of ac- 
tion and logistics at large-scale 
operations will be covered. 3 
credit hours. 



FS 406 Arson Investigation II 

Prerequisite: FS 402. An ad- 
vanced course showing the prin- 
ciples and methods of investiga- 
tion involving the techniques 
needed for the investigation of 
gas fires, automobile and boat 
fires, electrical fires, explosions 
and bomb scene investigation. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 407 Arson Investigation II 
Laboratory 

Experiments dealing with 
FS 406. Laboratory Fee. 1 credit 
hour. 

FS 408 Fire Protection Law 

A study of law in relation to 
fire protection, liability of per- 
sonnel, civil service, the search 
of the fire scene and criminal law 
related to arson and arson ar- 
rests. 3 credits. 

FS 410 Terrorism 

Terrorism, in one form or 
another, predates recorded his- 
tory. It has been used as a politi- 
cal weapon since man discov- 
ered that he could influence the 
behavior of others through in- 
timidation and the application of 
violence. Using the case study 
method, students will explore 
the history of terrorism, interna- 
tional terrorism, psychological 
profiles, today's methods of 
dealing with terrorism and coun- 
ter-terrorists' protections. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 425 Fire Protection Plan 
Review 

Prerequisite: FS 301. The tech- 
nical and hands-on practical ex- 
perience necessary to complete a 
review of plans and specifica- 
tions for fire safety and protec- 
tion of a building. The process 
includes site selection, water 
supplies for fire protection, fire 
pumps, automatic sprinkler and 
standpipe systems, fire alarm/ 
detection systems as well as 
compliance with Fire/Life Safety 
Codes. 3 credit hours. 



FS 450 Fire Protection Heat 
Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 301. The es- 
sentials of fire spread and fire be- 
havior: the combustion process, 
heat transfer, limits of flamma- 
bility, flames and fire plumes, 
burning of fuels, flaming com- 
bustion, spread of flame, flash- 
over, and production and move- 
ment of smoke. 3 credit hours. 

FS 498-499 Research Project 

One lecture per week in 
FS 498; credit — 1 credit hour. 
One lecture and one laboratory 
session per week in FS 499; 
credit — 2 credit hours. Develop- 
ment of a student project and a 
written report in a specified area 
in fire administration or fire sci- 
ence technology with faculty su- 
pervision. Grade awarded upon 
completion of project. 3 credit 
hours in total. 

FS 500 Selected Topics 

Selected topics in fire science 
on a variety of current problems 
and specialized areas not avail- 
able in the regular curriculum. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 501 Internship 

Prerequisite: consent of the di- 
rector of the fire science pro- 
gram. This program provides 
monitored field experience with 
selected agencies subject to aca- 
demic guidance and review. 3 
credits. 

FS 503 Patient Evacuation and 
Protection 

In a fire emergency, patients 
depend on a well-trained emer- 
gency response team. Evacua- 
tion drills in hospitals, nursing 
homes and board care facilities 
are not always possible. A pre- 
pared staff is the best insurance 
against disaster, should a fire oc- 
cur. Focus on the special circum- 
stances of health care facilities 
that determine whether or not 
patient evacuation is appro- 
priate. Case studies of successful 
evacuations reviewed and dis- 
cussed. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 201 



FS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of fac- HistOrV 

ulty member and chairman of 

department. Opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of interest. This course must 
be initiated by the student. 3 
credit hours. 



French 



FR 101-102 Elementary French 

Stresses pronunciation, aural 
and reading comprehension, ba- 
sic conversation and the funda- 
mental principles of grammar. 6 
credit hours. 

FR 201-202 Intermediate French 

Prerequisites: FR 101-102 or 
equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose 
texts and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to do some 
reading in their own areas of in- 
terest. 6 credit hours. 



German 



GR 101-102 Elementary German 

Stresses pronunciation, aural 
and reading comprehension, ba- 
sic conversation and the funda- 
mental princples of grammar. 6 
credit hours. 

GR 201-202 Intermediate 
German 

Prerequisites: GR 101-102 or 
the equivalent. Stresses the read- 
ing comprehension of modern 
prose texts and a review of gram- 
mar necessary for this reading. 
Texts used in the course are se- 
lected from many areas of study, 
including physics, biology and 
chemistry. Students are encour- 
aged to read in their own areas 
of interest. 6 credit hours. 



HS 101 Foundations of the 
Western World 

Traces the course of western 
civilization from its earliest be- 
ginnings in the ancient Middle 
East down to the eighteenth cen- 
tury. Includes major cultural 
trends, interactions between so- 
ciety and economy and analysis 
of the rise and fall of empires. 3 
credit hours. 

HS 102 The Western World in 
Modem Times 

Europe and its global impact 
from the eighteenth century to 
the present. Includes revolution- 
ary movements, the evolution of 
mass democracy and the world 
wars of the twentieth century. 
Not open to those who have had 
HS 106. 3 credit hours. 

HS 105 Foundations of 
Economic History 

A survey of the economic his- 
tory of the western world from 
the earliest civilizations to the 
advent of industrialization in Eu- 
rope. Includes discussion of the 
ancient economy, the commer- 
cial revolution and the impact of 
European colonization. 3 credit 
hours. 

HS 106 Modern Economic 
History 

Economic development of the 
industrialized world in the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries. 
Includes United States, Europe, 
Japan. Special emphasis will be 
given to the social and cultural 
impact of economic change. Not 
open to those who have had 
HS 102. 3 credit hours. 

HS 108 History of Science 

The development of science 
and technology from antiquity to 
the present. Their impact on so- 
ciety and the world. 3 credit 
hours. 



HS 110 American History 
since 1607 

A one-semester survey course, 
covering such major topics as co- 
lonial legacies, the American 
Revolution, nation-state build- 
ing, sectional tensions, urbaniza- 
tion, industrialization, the rise to 
world power status, social and 
cultural developments and post- 
World War II. Not open to those 
who have had HS 211 or 212. 3 
credit hours. 

HS 120 History of Blacks in the 
United States 

The history and background of 
Black people in the United 
States. Social, political and cul- 
tural development. 3 credit 
hours. 

HS 204 History of Sport 
and Leisure 

A survey of the history of 
sport and leisure in the United 
States with some comparative 
study of Europe and non-West- 
ern cultures. Topics include the 
rise of professional sports, and 
the commercialization of leisure. 
Offered spring semester of even- 
numbered years. 3 credit hours. 

HS 207 World History since 1945 

Survey of major events and 
trends since World War II. Ad- 
vanced industrial societies are 
emphasized. Includes decoloni- 
zation, East-West conflicts and 
patterns of economic coopera- 
tion and competition. Offered 
fall semester of even-numbered 
years. 3 credit hours. 

HS 211 United States to 1865 

Survey of American social eco- 
nomic, political and diplomatic 
developments from Colonial 
times to 1865. Not open to those 
who have had HS 110. 3 credit 
hours. 



202 

HS 212 United States since 1865 
Survey of American history 
from 1865 to the present. Institu- 
tional and industrial expansion, 
periods of reform and adjust- 
ment. The U.S. as a world 
power. Not open to those who 
have had HS 110. 3 credit hours. 

HS 223 United States 
Diplomatic History 

The ideas, trends and inter- 
pretations of U.S. diplomacy 
from the American Revolution to 
the present. 3 credit hours. 

HS 260 Modern Asia 

The ideological, cultural and 
traditional political, economic 
and diplomatic history of East, 
South and Southeast Asia from 
the sixteenth century to the pres- 
ent. 3 credit hours. 

HS 306 Modern Technology and 
Western Culture 

The development of the mod- 
em technological world and its 
relationship to social, economic 
and cultural changes from the In- 
dustrial Revolution to the pres- 
ent. 3 credit hours. 

HS 311 Colonial and 
Revolutionary America to 1789 
The cultural and political back- 
ground of British North 
America, Colonial and Revolu- 
tionary America. The creation of 
a republican society. 3 credit 
hours. 

HS 312 United States in the 
Twentieth Century 

The interaction of pohtical, 
economic, social, intellectual 
and diplomatic events and their 
impact upon twenheth century 
America. 3 credit hours. 

HS 343 Renaissance and 
Reformation Europe 

Europe from 1300 to 1650; 
from feudal state to nation state; 
religious unity to diversity. 3 
credit hours. 



HS 344 Europe in the 
Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth Centuries 

The cultural, political and eco- 
nomic life of Europe from classi- 
cism to the Napoleonic period; 
the Enhghtenment. 3 credit 
hours. 

HS 345 Europe in the 
Nineteenth Century 

European history from the Na- 
poleonic period to World War I; 
its internal development and 
world impact. 3 credit hours. 

HS 351 Russia and the 
Soviet Union 

The development of czarist 
Russia from 1200 to the Revolu- 
tion of 1917; the U.S.S.R. from 
1917 to the present. Offered 
spring semester of even-num- 
bered years. 3 credit hours. 

HS 353 Modern Britain 

The development of British 
history from the Restoration of 
1660 to the present. Includes Bri- 
tain's role in international af- 
fairs. Special emphasis on social 
and economic topics. Offered fall 
semester of odd-numbered 
years. 3 credit hours. 

HS 355 Modem Germany 

German civilization from the 
seventeenth century to the pres- 
ent; its impact on Europe and the 
world. 3 credit hours. 

HS 381-389 Selected Studies in 
History 

Special topics in history deal- 
ing with the modern world. A 
study in depth of vital historical 
issues. 3 credit hours. 

HS 446 Europe in the Twentieth 
Century 

Recent and contemporary Eu- 
ropean history beginning with 
World War I. Institutional devel- 
opment and its changing role in 
politics. 3 credit hours. 



HS 491 Senior Seminar 

The undertaking of an inde- 
pendent study and research 
project. Required of all history 
majors in their senior year. 3 
credit hours. 

HS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. Opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of interest. This course must 
be initiated by the student. 1-3 
credit hours per semester with a 
maximum of 6. 



Hotel and 

Restaurant 

Management 

HR 200 Art and Science of 
Hospitality Management 

Introductory course to famil- 
iarize students with the scope of 
the hotel and restaurant industry 
with emphasis on current trends 
in management and operations. 
3 credit hours. 

HR 202 Volume Food 
Purchasing 

Introduction to the purchas- 
ing, receiving and issuing of 
foods and food items. The identi- 
fication of guides, preparation of 
specifications and cost control 
procedures are stressed. 3 credit 
hours. 

HR 304 Volume Food 
Production and Service II 

Prerequisites: DI 200, HR 202, 
DI 214, DI 216, and MG 125. 
Course synthesizes the concepts 
found in the prerequisites with 
lectures, actual kitchen produc- 
tion, and dining room service 
management opportunities. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 



HR 305 Wine Appreciation 

Prerequisite: HR 304. Consid- 
ers the major wines and wine re- 
gions of the world, with empha- 
sis on American, French, and 
German wines. Wine tasting is 
an integral part of the course. 
Student must be 21 years of age. 
Laboratory Fee. 3 credit hours. 

HR 310 Club Management 

Typical organizational struc- 
tures, management techniques, 
and the special aspects of club 
operations are studied. 3 credit 
hours. 

HR 315 Bar Management 

Manager and employee roles 
in developing and operating 
profitable beverage operations 
are studied. 3 credit hours. 

HR 326 Hospitality Human 
Resources 

Prerequisite: MG 231. Tech- 
niques and philosophies of per- 
sonnel management as applied 
to various types of hospitality 
operations. 3 credit hours. 

HR 330 Hospitality Property 
Management 

Examines the various aspects 
of plant and property manage- 
ment to include engineering sys- 
tems, facilities development, 
and physical plant management 
and housekeeping. 3 credit 
hours. 



HR 404 Volume Food 
Production and Service III 

Prerequisite: «HR 304. Cap- 
stone course in food production 
and service. Provides students 
the opportunity to practice ad- 
vanced techniques within vari- 
ous international and domestic 
cuisines. Laboratory Fee. 3 credit 
hours. 

HR 410 Hotel and Restaurant 
Operations 

Prerequisites: HR 304 and HR 
326. Analysis and evaluation of 
hotel and restaurant administra- 
tion systems and operations. 
Emphasis is placed upon analyt- 
ical techniques and case study 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

HR 411 Hospitality Layout and 
Design 

Prerequisites: HR 304 and HR 
330. Prospectus and feasibility 
planning for hospitality opera- 
tions. Overall property design 
and layout of facilities and equip- 
ment are studied. 3 credit hours. 

HR 412 Hospitality Law 

Prerequisite: tA 101. Applica- 
tion of the law to aspects of the 
hospitality industry to include 
the innkeeper/guest relation- 
ship, rights of employees/em- 
ployers, liabilities, and negligent 
acts. 3 credit hours. 

Hr 425 Hospitality Accounting 
Systems 

Prerequisite: A 102. Current 
methods, techniques and princi- 
ples of hotel and restaurant 
accounting. Emphasis on food, 
beverage and labor cost control; 
internal control; and hospitality 
specific systems. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 203 

HR 426 Front Office and 
Management Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: HR 425. Com- 
bines principles and procedures 
in front office operations with 
current developments in man- 
agement information systems 
for hotel and restaurant applica- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

HR 490-499 Special Studies in 
Hospitality 

Special studies on a variety of 
current topics and specialized 
areas in the field not available as 
part of the regular curriculum. 
3 credit hours. 

HR 512 Senior Seminar 

Prerequisites: HR 304, HR 326, 
HR 330 and senior status. Group 
discussion /reflection and possi- 
ble research on current topics 
and developments within the 
hospital industry. 3 credit hours. 

HR 599 Independent Study 

Independent research projects 
or other approved phases of in- 
dependent study. Permission of 
the department chairman is re- 
quired. 3 credit hours. 



Humanities 

HU 300 Nature of Science 

Prerequisites: E 110, HS 101, a 
laboratory science course, and a 
social science course. Investi- 
gates science as a human activ- 
ity, as a social institution, and as 
an instrument for acquiring and 
using knowledge. The nature of 
scientific knowledge, the organi- 
zation of scientific activity and 
the interaction of science with 
technology and culture. A 
course about science and the 
process of generating new 
knowledge. 3 credit hours. 



204 



Industrial 
Engineering 



IE 204 Engineering Economics 

Prerequisite: M 117. A quanti- 
tative analysis of applied eco- 
nomics in engineering design; 
the economy study for compar- 
ing alternatives; interest formu- 
lae; quantitative methods of 
comparing alternatives; intangi- 
ble considerations; selection and 
replacement economy for ma- 
chines and structures; break- 
even and minimum cost points; 
depreciation; effect of income 
taxes on the economy study; re- 
view of current industrial prac- 
tices. Promotes logical decisions 
through the consideration of al- 
ternative courses of action. 3 
credit hours. 

IE 214 Engineering 
Management 

Provides insight into the ele- 
ments of the managerial process 
and develops a rational ap- 
proach to the problem of manag- 
ing productive processes and the 
engineering function. Focusing 
largely upon the complex prob- 
lems of top- and middle-level 
management, course investi- 
gates the modern tools that man- 
agers use under given circum- 
stances, stressing the ongoing 
activities of management as part 
of an integrated, continuous pro- 
cess. 3 credit hours. 



IE 223 Personnel 
Administration 

Prerequisite: IE 214 or MG 
125. Provides a foundation in 
fundamental concepts and a 
general know^ledge of tech- 
niques in the administration of 
personnel relations. The nature 
of personnel administration, the 
handling of personnel problems, 
employee attitudes and morale. 
Techniques of personnel admin- 
istration; recruitment and inter- 
views, placement, training, em- 
ployee rating. In addition, wage 
policies and administration re- 
lated to the IE function are em- 
phasized. In order to secure 
breadth and depth in the ap- 
proach to personnel problems, 
case studies are used at appro- 
priate points throughout the 
course. 3 credit hours. 

IE 303 Cost Control 

Prerequisite: M 118 and junior 
standing. Basic analysis of cost 
control techniques. Designed to 
give members of the manage- 
ment team the underlying rudi- 
ments of cost estimating and 
control systems. Theory of stan- 
dard costs, flexible budgeting 
and overhead handling tech- 
niques emphasized by analytical 
problem solution. Life-cycle 
costing. Value engineering. 3 
credit hours. 

IE 304 Production Control 

Prerequisites: IE 214, M 118 
and junior standing. The basic 
principles that govern the design 
of production control systems in 
an industrial plant. The princi- 
ples used in solving problems of 
procuring and controlling mate- 
rials, in planning, routing, 
scheduling and dispatching are 
considered. Familiarizes the stu- 
dent with existing and new 
methods, used in this field in- 
cluding MRP, JIT, computer- 
aided process planning and 
group technology. 3 credit 
hours. 



IE 343 Work Design 

Prerequisite: IE 346. Introduc- 
tory course in the design and 
evaluation of efficient work 
methods and working environ- 
ments. Techniques useful in 
problem definition, design of al- 
ternative work methods, and 
evaluation of alternative designs 
include process charting, opera- 
tion analysis, and principles of 
motion economy. Emphasis 
placed on human factors and 
safety implications of alternative 
work method designs. Equitable 
time standards are developed for 
work method designs through 
the use of time study procedures 
including stopwatch time study, 
computerized predetermined- 
time systems and work sam- 
pling. Laboratory Fee. 4 credit 
hours. 

IE 344 Human Factors 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 347. Covers 
psychological and physiological 
aspects of people at work, in- 
cluding: work physiology, infor- 
mation processing, motor skills 
and movement control, signal 
detection theory and anthropo- 
metery with the aim of improve- 
ments in workplace design. Lab- 
oratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

IE 346 Probability Analysis 

Prerequisite: M 203. Develops 
the theory of probability and re- 
lated applications. Covers com- 
binations and permutations, 
probability space, law of large 
numbers, random variables, 
conditional probability, Bayes' 
Theorem, Markov chains and 
stochastic processes. 3 credit 
hours. (This course is cross listed 
with M 371 Probability and Sta- 
tistics I.) 



IE 347 Statistical Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 346. Provides 
an introduction to the applica- 
tion of statistical techniques to 
engineering problems. Measures 
of central tendency and disper- 
sion, estimation, hypothesis 
testing, correlation and regres- 
sion, elementary analysis of vari- 
ance. 3 credit hours. (This course 
is cross listed with M 472 Proba- 
bility and Statistics II.) 

IE 348 Manufacturing Processes 

Corequisite: IE 304. Provides a 
basic understanding of the metal 
cutting as applied to conven- 
tional manufacturing. Properties 
of material; machining funda- 
mentals; tool geometry; surface 
finish; forces; material removal 
processes; casting processes; 
measurement and inspection; 
process capability and quality 
control; ferrous and nonferrous 
metals; chiptype machining pro- 
cesses; machining economics in 
turning, milling and drilling. 
Students are required to design 
and produce laboratory projects. 
3 credit hours. 

IE 402 Operations Research 

Prerequisite: IE 346. The oper- 
ations research area is oriented 
to various mathematical meth- 
ods for solving certain kinds of 
industrial problems. Topics in- 
cluded are: linear programming, 
including simplex method; 
transportation and assignment 
problems; queueing; dynamic 
programming; simulation. 3 
credit hours. 

IE 408 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 214, senior 
standing. Presents the analytical 
and conceptual techniques upon 
which systems analysis and de- 
velopment is based, and applica- 
tions to business and industrial 
fields. Development of case 
studies and their application, 
oriented to improved designs. 3 
credit hours. 



IE 435 Simulation and 
Applications 

Prerequisites: IE 347 and ei- 
ther CS 224 or CS 228. Corequi- 
site: IE 402. Techniques for 
mathematical modeling of a sys- 
tem (business or scientific/engi- 
neering) using computer simula- 
tion. Simulation principles will 
be emphasized. Student exer- 
cises and design projects will be 
run using modern simulation 
packages. 3 credit hours. 

IE 436 Quality Control 

Prerequisite: IE 347. Econom- 
ics of quality control; modern 
methods used by industry to 
achieve quality of product; pre- 
venting defects; organizing for 
quality; locating chronic sources 
of trouble; coordinating specifi- 
cations, manufacturing and in- 
spection; measuring process ca- 
pability; using inspection data to 
regulate manufacturing pro- 
cesses; statistical methods, con- 
trol charts, selection of modern 
sampling plans. 3 credit hours. 

IE 437 Metrology and 
Inspection in Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: IE 436. The study 
of metrology and inspection 
practices in manufacturing. Em- 
phasis on the design and devel- 
opment of different types of 
gauging for inspection in manu- 
facturing. Laboratory Fee. 3 
credit hours. 



Courses 205 

IE 443 Facilties Planning 

Prerequisites: IE 304, IE 343, 
senior IE standing. Factors in 
plant location, design and layout 
of equipment. Techniques for 
obtaining information essential 
to the development and evalua- 
tion of alternative facility layout 
designs are presented with an 
emphasis on environmental and 
safety considerations. Design of 
departmental areas, resource al- 
location and flow, materials han- 
dling, storage, and the economic 
implications of alternative de- 
signs are discussed. Students 
work in small groups on the de- 
sign of a manufacturing facility 
to produce an actual consumer 
product. Project culminates in 
both a written and oral presenta- 
tion of the proposed facility de- 
sign. CAD techniques are used 
extensively in the development 
of the final facility layout. 3 
credit hours. 

IE 448 Advanced Manufacturing 
Engineering Operations 

Prerequisites: MT 200 and 
IE 348. A course for understand- 
ing machining economics and 
the basic principles of the theory 
of metal cutting and metal work- 
ing to improve manufacturing 
engineering operations. Course 
emphasizes design and opera- 
tion of better tooling for different 
types of manufacturing opera- 
tions. Experimental inves- 
tigation of metal cutting and 
metal working methodologies 
stressed. Laboratory Fee. 3 credit 
hours. 

IE 449 Principles of Compuler- 
Aided Manufacturing 

Prerequisites: IE 448 and EE 
211. A course on the principles 
and practices of computer nu- 
merical control. Course empha- 
sizes part programming and op- 
eration of both numerical control 
and direct numerical control ma- 
chines. Students are required to 
design, program and machine 
laboratory projects. Laboratory 
Fee. 3 credit hours. 



206 

IE 504 Senior Project 

Prerequisite: senior status and 
permission of the department. 
The student, in conjunction with 
a faculty adviser, selects and 
works on a project. Work is pre- 
sented at a seminar at the end of 
the semester. 3 credit hours. 

IE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 
A planned program of individual 
study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 3 credit 
hours. 



International 
Business 

312 International Business 

Analysis of business environ- 
ments with special emphasis on 
similarities and differences 
among the nations of the world, 
and views toward developing in- 
tercultural managerial effective- 
ness. 3 credit hours. 

IB 421 Operation of the 
Multinational Corporation 

Prerequisite: IB 312. Specific 
problems encountered by multi- 
national firms. Topics include in- 
vestment decisions, environ- 
mental scanning, planning and 
control and the social responsi- 
bilities of firms in host nations. 3 
credit hours. 

IB 549 International Business 
Policy 

Prerequisite: MK 413, junior 
standing. Identification and rela- 
tion of the elements involved in 
the dynamics of a company and 
its international environment 
through case analysis. This is a 
capstone course in international 
business. 3 credit hours. 

IB 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: IB 312, junior 
standing. A planned program of 
individual study under the su- 
pervision of a member of the fac- 
ulty. 3 credit hours. 



Journalism 



J 101 Journalism I 

A survey of journalism de- 
signed to acquaint students with 
the profession. The American 
newspaper as a social institution 
and a medium of communica- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

J 201 News Writing and 
Reporting 

Prerequisite: J 101 or permis- 
sion of instructor. The elements 
of news, the style and the struc- 
ture of news stories, news-gath- 
ering methods, copyreading and 
editing, reporting. 3 credit 
hours. 

J 202 Advanced News Writing 
and Reporting 

Prerequisite: J 201. Intensive 
practice in news writing and re- 
porting. 3 credit hours. 

J 311 The Copy Desk 

Intensive practice in copyread- 
ing, editing and revising, head- 
line writing, photograph selec- 
tion, page make-up, and 
reporting. Regular critiques of 
the copy-desk work of major 
newspapers. 3 credit hours. 

J 351 Journalistic Performance 

Students follow the coverage 
in the media given to selected 
topics, and prepare to make 
judgments of the coverage by 
doing research and becoming 
knowledgeable about the partic- 
ular topic chosen. The course 
stresses analytical reading and 
responsible, informed criticism. 
3 credit hours. 

J 367 Interpretive and 
Editorial Writing 

Practice in the writing of con- 
sidered and knowledgeable 
commentaries on current affairs 
and in writing of interpretive ar- 
ticles based on investigation, re- 
search and interviews. 3 credit 
hours. 



J 450-459 Special Topics in 
Journalism 

Special topics in journalism 
which are of current or special 
interest. 3 credits each. 

J 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor and journalism coordi- 
nator. Opportunity for a stu- 
dent, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of interest. 3 credit hours. 



Law 

(See Business Law) 



Logistics 



LG 300 Defense Sector Logistics 

Prerequisites: E 105, E 110, 
M 228, CS 107. Introduction to 
logistics as practiced in the de- 
fense industry, the military, and 
in multinational corporations 
operating foreign installations. 
Overview of logistics, elements, 
nomenclature, techniques, man- 
agement, and computer sup- 
port. Survey of regulations, stan- 
dards, and logistics products. 
Identification of logistics and 
its place in defense-related sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

LG 310 Introduction to Logistics 
Support Analysis 

Prerequisite: LG 300. Defini- 
tion and description of logistics 
support analysis with reference 
to MIL-STD-1388-1A and deriva- 
tive requirements. Survey of in- 
tegrated logistics support theory 
and practice and the role of LSA. 
The role of a logistics support 
analysis plan, its method of con- 
struction, and its use in real sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 



LG 320 Reliability and 
Maintainability Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: LG 300. Basic de- 
scription and analysis of the con- 
cepts of reliability and maintain- 
ability in large high-technology 
systems. Introduction to quanti- 
tative techniques and quality as- 
surance. Strategies for optimiz- 
ing effectiveness and in-service 
support. 3 credit hours. 

LG 410 Life Cycle Concepts 

Prerequisites: LG 300 and LG 
320. Introduction to life cycle 
concepts in product design, 
quality engineering, field sup- 
port, maintenance, training, and 
end-use disposal. Techniques of 
life cycle costing and the con- 
strucHon of life cycle forecasts. 
Product and weapon system 
warranties, and their interface 
with logishcs support. 3 credit 
hours. 

LG 440 Data Management in 
Logistics Systems 

Prerequisites: LG 300 and LG 
310. Review of the role of data 
collection, analysis and report 
generaHon in logistics systems 
management. Uses of computer- 
aided management information 
systems, technical data acquisi- 
tion, and software support in lo- 
gistics organization. Require- 
ments for documentation, data 
renewal, and the generation of 
integrated logistics support 
plans and reports. 3 credit hours. 



Management 

Information 

Science 



MS 200 Foundation of 
Information Management 
Systems 

Introduction to microcom- 
puter technologies as used by 
managers. Includes develop- 
ment of hardware and software 
specifications, cost-benefit anal- 
ysis, information centers, office 
automation, networking, and an 
overview of commonly used 
software packages. 3 credit 
hours. 

MS 300 Microcomputers and 
Networking within 
Organizations 

Prerequisite: MS 200. Intro- 
duction to microcomputer tech- 
nologies as used by managers. 
Includes development of hard- 
ware and software specifica- 
tions, cost-benefit analysis, in- 
formation centers, office 
automation, networking, and an 
overview of commonly used 
software packages. 3 credit 
hours. 

MS 400 Systems Analysis and 
Design within Organizations 

Prerequisites: MS 200 and MS 
300. Introduction to the informa- 
tion systems development cycle. 
Includes problem specification, 
systems analysis and design, 
hardware and software acquisi- 
tion, implementation, mainte- 
nance, and system monitoring. 3 
credit hours. 



Courses 207 

MS 460 Information Systems 
within Organizations 

Prerequisites: MS 200 and 
MS 400. Application of MS tech- 
nologies to the management of 
organizations. Includes the use 
of Decision Support Systems 
(DSS), Executive Information 
Systems (EIS), and Expert Sys- 
tems (ES). Extensive use of cases 
to demonstrate the usefulness in 
decision making DSS, EIS, ES, 
and other software packages. 3 
credit hours. 

MS 480 Seminar in Information 
Management Systems 

Prerequisites: MS 400 and MS 
460. Managerial implications of 
emerging trends in computing 
technologies. Includes systems 
design configurations, integra- 
tion of audio and video tech- 
nologies, impacts on manage- 
ment structure employment, 
security planning, and extensive 
use of cases. 3 credit hours. 



Management 



MG 120 Development of 
American Sports 

A survey of the American 
Sports Industry and how it re- 
lates to society: issues and prob- 
lems in national and interna- 
tional sport activities. An 
analysis of current sport issues 
and trends. 3 credit hours. 

MG 125 Management and 
Organization 

A study of management sys- 
tems as they apply to all organi- 
zations. Managerial functions, 
principles of management, and 
other aspects of the management 
process are examined. 3 credit 
hours. 



208 

MG 130 Management of Sports 
Industries 

A survey of the principles of 
management applicable to the 
administration of aspects of 
sports enterprises: planning, 
controlling, organizing, staffing 
and directing of the various ac- 
tivities necessary for effective 
functioning. 3 credit hours. 

MG 231 Management of Human 
Resources 

Prerequisite: MG 125. A sur- 
vey of the industrial relations 
and the personnel management 
system of an organization. Man- 
power planning/forecasting; la- 
bor markets; selection and place- 
ment; training and 
development; compensation; 
government/employer and la- 
bor/management relations. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 232 Labor Relations 

Prerequisite: MG 125. A study 
of the development of American 
trade unions and the various 
stages of their relationship with 
business ownership and man- 
agement, their structure and 
strategies, labor legislation and 
their impact. Negotiation strate- 
gies, causes of and strategies for 
resolving labor conflict. Attain- 
ing union-management coopera- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

MG 235 Public Relations in 
Sports 

A study of individual and 
group behavior as they relate to 
the press, politicians, parents, 
broadcasting and other groups 
that require interpersonal rela- 
tionships in daily decision mak- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 

MG 317 Small Business 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 125. A realis- 
tic examination of some of the 
characteristics, opportunities, 
risk-taking, and decision-mak- 
ing in new business enterprises 
or self-employment ventures. 3 
credit hours. 



MG 325 Sports Industries 
and the Law 

Legal aspects as they relate to 
professional and amateur sport 
institutions. An analysis of legal 
problems and issues confronting 
the sports manager; suits against 
the organizational structure, 
safety, collective bargaining and 
arbitration and antitrust viola- 
tions 3 credit hours. 

MG 332 Management of 
Compensation 

Prerequisite: MG 231. A study 
of all aspects of the compensa- 
tion process; criteria used in de- 
veloping pay scales, merit sys- 
tems and fringe benefits and 
techniques for administration 
and control of established sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

MG 350 Advanced Management 

Prerequisite: MG 125. A rein- 
forcement of the principles and 
practices of management and or- 
ganization theory from MG 125. 
Application of management 
practices to the functional areas, 
the human factor in organiza- 
tions, current research and read- 
ings. 3 credit hours. 

MG 415 Multinational 
Management 

Prerequisites: IB 312, MG 125. 
An analysis and examination of 
management and organizational 
behavior against a background 
of diversified cultural systems. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 430 Financial Management 
for Sports Administration 

Prerequisite: FI 113. Methods 
and procedures as they apply to 
sports administration, taxation, 
purchasing, cost analysis, budg- 
eting and the financial problems 
dealing with mass media. 3 
credit hours. 



MG 450-454 Special Studies in 
Business 

Prerequisite: junior standing. 
Special studies in business and 
public administration. Work 
may include study and analysis 
of specific problems within units 
of business or government and 
application of theory to those 
problems, programs of research 
related to a student's discipline, 
or special projects. Several ses- 
sions may run concurrently. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 455 Managerial 
Effectiveness 

Prerequisites: MG 324, MG 
350. An examination of current 
practices used in identifying and 
developing effective managers. 
The problems of the managerial 
environment, approaches used 
to alleviate these problems, de- 
velopment of organizational and 
managerial effectiveness. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 470 Management of 
Corporate Culture 

Prerequisites: MG 125, junior 
or senior standing. A study of 
Corporate Culture. Its develop- 
ment and influence on business 
strategies, organizational perfor- 
mance, development and change 
and affects on managerial effec- 
tiveness. 3 credit hours. 

MG 512 Contemporary Issues in 
Business and Society 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 
A rigorous examination of com- 
peting concepts of the role of 
business in society. A capstone, 
integrative course relating the 
firm to its environment includ- 
ing issues arising from aggregate 
social, political, legal and eco- 
nomic factors. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 209 



MG 515 Management Seminar 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 
An introduction to contempo- 
rary publications and the find- 
ings of research study reports. 
Analysis, interpretation and de- 
termination of impact of publica- 
tions on the theory and practice 
of management. 3 credit hours. 

MG 520 Current Issues in 
Human Resource Management 

Prerequisite: MG 231. Exam- 
ine research findings and current 
literature relevant to issues af- 
fecting personnel functions in 
the organization. 3 credit hours. 

MG 550 Business Policy 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 
An examination of organiza- 
tional policies from the view- 
point of top-level executives, 
and a development of analytical 
frameworks for achieving the 
goals of the total organization. 
Discussion of cases and develop- 
ment of oral and written skills. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: project, student 
and faculty director must be ap- 
proved by the department chair- 
man and the dean of the busi- 
ness school. Independent study 
on a project of interest to the stu- 
dent under the direction of a fac- 
ulty member designated by the 
department chairman. 3 credit 
hours. 



Marketing 



MK 105 Principles of Marketing 

The fundamental functions of 
marketing involving the flow of 
goods and services from produc- 
ers to consumers. Marketing 
methods of promotion, pricing, 
product decisions and distribu- 
tion channels. 3 credit hours. 



MK 121 Retailing 

Prerequisite: MK 105. Survey 
of the problems and opportuni- 
ties in the retail distribution field 
including a basic understanding 
of buying, selling and promotion 
of the retail consumer market. 3 
credit hours. 

MK 205 Consumer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 105. A study 
of the principal comprehensive 
marketing models which focus 
on buyer decision processes. 
Topics include brand switching 
decisions, measures of media ef- 
fectiveness, market segmenta- 
tion and other marketing tech- 
niques. 3 credit hours. 

MK 302 Industrial Marketing 

Prerequisite: MK 105. Prac- 
tices and policies in the distribu- 
tion of industrial goods includ- 
ing purchasing, market analysis, 
channels of distribution, pricing, 
competitive practices and oper- 
ating costs. 3 credit hours. 

MK 307 Advertising and 
Promotion 

Prerequisite: MK 105. The de- 
sign, management and evalua- 
tion of the various communica- 
tions programs involved in 
marketing and public relations. 3 
credit hours. 

MK 316 Sales Management 

Prerequisite: MK 105. The 
management of a sales organiza- 
tion. Recruiting, selecting, train- 
ing, supervision, motivation and 
compensation of sales person- 
nel. 3 credit hours. 

MK 413 International 
Marketing Management 

Prerequisites: IB 312, MK 105. 
Applied marketing decision 
making in international firms. 
The development of marketing 
strategy and techniques in for- 
eign markets. 3 credit hours. 



MK 442 Marketing Research 
and Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 105, QA 
216, junior standing. Research as 
a component of the marketing 
information system. Research 
design, sampling methods, data 
interpretation and management 
of the marketing research func- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

MK 470 Business Logistics 

Prerequisites: MK 105, QA 
118, junior standing. The design 
and administration of systems to 
control physical product flows. 
Both spatial and temporal con- 
straints are treated in the devel- 
opment of transportation, ware- 
housing and manufacturing 
systems. 3 credit hours. 

MK 515 Marketing Management 

Prerequisites: MK 105, MK 
442, senior standing. The analy- 
sis, planning and control of the 
marketing effort within the firm. 
Emphasis on case analysis. A 
marketing capstone course. 3 
credit hours. 

MK 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: MK 105, junior 
standing. A planned program of 
individual study under the su- 
pervision of a member of the fac- 
ulty. 3 credit hours. 



210 



Mathematics 



All prerequisites for the following 
mathematics courses must be strictly 
observed unless waived by permis- 
sion of the mathematics department. 

M 103 Fundamental 
Mathematics 

Required at the inception of 
the program of study of all stu- 
dents (day and evening) who do 
not show sufficient competency 
with fundamental arithmetic 
and algebra, as determined by 
placement examination. Review 
and individualized help as 
needed in the arithmetic of 
whole numbers, decimals, frac- 
tions, and percents. Introduc- 
tion to sets. Elementary algebra. 
Topics from logic, probability, 
and statistics as time permits. 
(Students placed in M 103 must 
successfully complete this 
course before taking any other 
course having mathematical con- 
tent.) Students who take M 103 
will have the total number of 
credits required for graduation 
increased by 3 credits. 3 credit 
hours (4 to 6 meeting hours per 
week). 

M 109 Elementary College 
Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 103 or place- 
ment by the department. A re- 
view of the fundamental opera- 
tions and an extensive study of 
functions, exponents, radicals, 
linear and quadratic equations. 
Addtional topics include ratio, 
proportion, variation, progres- 
sion and the binomial theorem. 
3 credit hours. 

M 115 Pre-Calculus 
Mathematics 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or 
higher in M 109 or placement by 
the department. Offers the foun- 
dation needed for the study of 
calculus. Polynomials, algebraic 
functions, elementary point ge- 
ometry, plane analytic trigonom- 
etry and properties of exponen- 
tial functions. 4 credit hours. 



M 117 Calculus I 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or 
higher in M 115 or placement by 
the department. The first-year 
college course for majors in 
mathematics, science and engi- 
neering; and the basic prerequi- 
site for all advanced mathemat- 
ics. Introduces differential and 
integral calculus of functions of 
one variable, along with plane 
analytic geometry. 4 credit 
hours. 

M 118 Calculus II 

Prerequisite: M 117. Continua- 
tion of first-year calculus, includ- 
ing methods of integration, the 
fundamental integration theo- 
rem, differentiation and integra- 
tion of transcendental functions, 
varied applications, infinite se- 
ries and indeterminate forms. 4 
credit hours. 

M 121 Algebraic Structures I 

A first course in an orientation 
to abstract mathematics: elemen- 
tary logic, sets, mappings, rela- 
tions, operations, elementary 
group theory. Open to all fresh- 
men and sophomores. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 122 Algebraic Structures II 

Prerequisite: M 121 or permis- 
sion of the department. A con- 
tinuation of M 121 including a 
variety of topics. 3 credit hours. 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

Prerequisite: M 103 or place- 
ment by the department. Basic 
discrete functions with numer- 
ous applications in the social sci- 
ences. Topics include elemen- 
tary set theory and counting 
techniques, functions and 
graphs, an introduction to com- 
puting and computers, an intro- 
duction to probability. 3 credit 
hours. 



M 203 Calculus III 

Prerequisite: M 118. The calcu- 
lus of multiple variables, cover- 
ing third-dimensional topics in 
analytics, linear algebra, and 
vector analysis, partial differen- 
tiation, maxima and minima for 
functions of several variables, 
line integrals, multiple integrals, 
spherical and cyhndrical polar 
coordinates. 4 credit hours. 

M 204 Differential Equations 

Prerequisite: M 203. The solu- 
tion of ordinary differential 
equations, including the use of 
Laplace transforms. Existence of 
solutions, series solutions, ma- 
trix methods, nonlinear equa- 
tions and varied applications. 3 
credit hours. 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

Prerequisite: M 127. A non- 
calculus based course which in- 
cludes basic probability theory, 
random variables and their dis- 
tributions, estimation and hy- 
pothesis testing, regression and 
correlation. Emphasis on an ap- 
plied approach to statistical the- 
ory with applications chosen 
from many different fields of 
study. Students will be intro- 
duced to and make use of the 
computer packages SPSS for 
data analysis. (Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken calculus.) 
4 credit hours. (This course is 
cross listed with P 301 Statistics 
for Behavioral Sciences.) 

M 270 Discrete Structures 

Prerequisites: M 118 and 
CS 102 or CS 106. Corequisite: 
M 203. This course introduces 
the student to the discrete struc- 
tures underlying the mathemati- 
cal foundations of computer sci- 
ence. Topics include sets and 
relations, recursive and induc- 
tive procedures, functions, 
groups and semigroups. Bool- 
ean algebras, elementary combi- 
natorics, and algorithm analysis. 
Applications of the above topics 
to computer science will be stud- 
ied. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 211 



M 303 Advanced Calculus 

Prerequisite: M 204. A survey 
course in applied mathematics. 
Vector calculus: line and surface 
integrals, integral theorems of 
Green and Stokes, and the diver- 
gence theorem. Complex vari- 
ables: elementary functions, 
Cauchy-Riemann equations, in- 
tegration, Cauchy integral theo- 
rem, infinite series, calculus of 
residues and conformal map- 
ping. 3 credit hours. 

M 309 Advanced Differential 
Equations 

Prerequisite: M 204. Theoreti- 
cal analysis and applications of 
non-linear differential equa- 
tions. Phase plane and space, 
perturbation theory and tech- 
niques, series and related meth- 
ods, stability theory and tech- 
niques and relaxation pheno- 
mena. 3 credit hours. 

M 311 Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 203. Matrices, 
systems of hnear equations and 
their solutions, linear vector 
spaces, linear transformations, 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors. 
Applications. 3 credit hours. 

M 321 Modern Algebra 

Prerequisites: M 121, M 311. 
Groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields, polynomials. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 325 Number Theory 

Prerequisite: M 121. Topics are 
selected from the following: 
mathematical induction, Euclid- 
ean algorithm, integers, number 
theoretic functions, Euler-Fer- 
mat theorems, congruence, qua- 
dratic residues and Peano 
axioms. 3 credit hours. 



M 331 Applied Combinatorics 

Prerequisite: M 270 or permis- 
sion of department. Problem 
solving using graph theory and 
combinatorical methods. Topics 
include counting methods, re- 
currence, generating functions, 
enumeration, graphs, trees, col- 
oring problems, network flows 
and matchings. Special empha- 
sis on reasoning which underlies 
combinatorical problems solv- 
ing, algorithm development and 
logical structure of programs. 3 
credit hours. 

M 338 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisites: M 204 and a pro- 
gramming language, e.g., FOR- 
TRAN/PASCAL. Topics include: 
solutions of algebraic and tran- 
scendental equations by iterative 
methods; system of linear equa- 
tions (matrix inversion, etc.); in- 
terpolation, numerical differenti- 
ation and integration; solution of 
ordinary differential equations. 
Scientific and engineering appli- 
cations. 3 credit hours. (This 
course is cross listed with EE 341 
Numerical Methods in Engineer- 
ing.) 

M 361 Mathematical Modeling 

Prerequisites: M 311 and at 
least junior standing. Problem 
solving through mathematical 
model building. Emphasis on 
applications of mathematics to 
the social, life and managerial 
sciences. Topics are selected 
from probability, graph theory, 
Markov processes, linear pro- 
gramming, optimization, game 
theory, simulation. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 371 Probability and 
Statistics I 

Prerequisite: M 203. Axiomatic 
study of probability: sample 
spaces, combinatorial analysis, 
independence and dependence, 
random variables, distribution 
functions, moment generating 
functions, central limit theorem. 
3 credit hours. (This course is 
cross listed with IE 346 Probabil- 
ity Analysis.) 



M 381 Real Analysis 

Prerequisite: M 203. Founda- 
tions of analysis, sets and func- 
tions, real and complex number 
systems; Hmits, convergence 
and continuity, sequences and 
infinite series, differentiation. 3 
credit hours. 

M 403 Techniques in Applied 
Mathematics 

Prerequisite: M 204. Tech- 
niques in applied analysis in- 
cluding Fourier series; orthogo- 
nal functions such as Bessel 
functions, Legendre polynomi- 
als, Chebychev polynomials, La- 
place and Fourier transforms; 
product solutions of partial dif- 
ferential equations and bound- 
ary value problems. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 423 Complex Variables 

Prerequisite: M 204. For math- 
ematics, science and engineering 
students. Review of elementary 
functions and Euler forms; holo- 
morphic functions, Laurent se- 
ries, singularities, calculus of 
residues, contour integration, 
maximum modulus theorem, bi- 
linear and inverse transforma- 
tion, conformal mapping, and 
analytic continuation. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 441 Topology 

Prerequisite: M 381. Topics se- 
lected from the following: 
Hausdorff neighborhood rela- 
tions: derived, open and closed 
sets; closure; topological space; 
bases; homeomorphisms; rela- 
tive topology; product spaces; 
separation axioms; metric 
spaces; connectedness and com- 
pactness. 3 credit hours. 



212 



M 472 Probability and 
Statistics II 

Prerequisite: M 371. Elements 
of the theory of point estimation, 
maximum likelihood estimates, 
theory of testing hypotheses, 
power of a test, confidence inter- 
vals, linear regression, experi- 
mental design and analysis of 
variance, correlation, and non- 
parametric tests. 3 credit hours. 
(This course is cross listed with 
IE 347 Statistical Analysis.) 

M 473 Advanced Statistical 
Inference 

Prerequisite: M 472. This 
course is designed to provide an 
in depth treatment of statistical 
inference. Topics include distri- 
bution of functions of one or sev- 
eral random variables, N-P struc- 
ture of tests of hypothesis, 
properties of "good" estimators 
and the multivariate normal dis- 
tribution. 3 credit hours. 

M 481 Linear Models I 

Prerequisite: M 472. This 
course is designed to provide a 
comprehensive study of linear 
regression. Topics include sim- 
ple linear regression, inference 
in simple linear regression, vio- 
lations of model assumptions, 
multiple linear regression and 
the Extra Sum of Squares Princi- 
ple. 3 credit hours. 

M 482 Linear Models II 

Prerequisite: M 481. Continu- 
ation of M 481, with an emphasis 
on experimental design. Topics 
include single-factor designs, 
two-factor designs, multiple-fac- 
tor designs and randomized 
block designs. 3 credit hours. 

M 491-499 Department Seminar 

A study of a mathematical 
topic or topics not covered in the 
above courses. Subject of study 
will be announced by the mathe- 
matics department in advance. A 
paper and/or seminar talk, suit- 
able for presentation to all inter- 
ested mathematics faculty, will 
be required. 3 credit hours. 



M 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. Opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of interest. This course must 
be initiated by the student. 1-3 
credit hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 



Materials 
Technology 

MT 200 Engineering Materials 

Prerequisite: CH 103. A study 
of the properties of the principal 
engineering materials of modern 
technology: steels and nonfer- 
rous alloys and their heat treat- 
ment, concrete, wood, ceramics 
and plastics. Gives engineers 
sufficient background to aid 
them in selecting materials and 
setting specifications. 3 credit 
hours. 

MT 219 Physical Metallurgy 

Prerequisite: CH 105. Intro- 
duction to the relationships be- 
tween atomic structure and mac- 
roscopic properties such as 
mechanical strength and ductil- 
ity. Atomic bonding, crystallog- 
raphy, phase equilibrium and 
phase transformations are 
among the topics considered. 3 
credit hours. 

MT 220 Electronic Materials 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Study of 
transport and rearrangement of 
charge to determine electric and 
magnetic properties of solids. 
Semiconductors, superconduc- 
tors and magnetic materials are 
among the topics considered. 3 
credit hours. 

MT 301 Welding Metallurgy 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Study of 
welding and brazing procedures 
of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, 
with consideration of macro and 
microstructures of welded mem- 
bers. 3 credit hours. 



MT 302 Polymeric Materials 

Prerequisite: CH 105. Chemis- 
try and physical properties of 
rubber and plastic materials. 
Consideration of both funda- 
mental principles and engineer- 
ing applications. 3 credit hours. 

MT 304 Mechanical Behavior of 
Materials 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Detailed 
study of elastic and plastic defor- 
mation of materials at room tem- 
perature and elevated tempera- 
tures. Dislocation theory and 
microplasticity models consid- 
ered. 3 credit hours. 

MT 310 Materials Laboratory 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Labora- 
tory documentation of the effects 
of heat treatment in annealing 
and hardening both ferrous and 
nonferrous materials. Micro- 
scopic observation and photog- 
raphy. Other experiments in ma- 
terials engineering. Laboratory 
Fee. 3 credit hours. 

MT 324 Nuclear Reactor 
Materials 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Consid- 
eration of nuclear reactors, the 
production and fabrication of 
metals and alloys used as reactor 
components, non-destructive 
testing and radiation damage of 
materials. 3 credit hours. 

MT 331 Nonferrous Metallurgy 

Prerequisite: MT 219. The 
physical metallurgy of alumi- 
num, copper, magnesium and 
other nonferrous metals. Alloy- 
ing, fabrication and consider- 
ation of materials properties 
which make nonferrous metals 
competitive with steels. 3 credit 
hours. 



Courses 213 



MT 342 Steels and Their Heat 
Treatment 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Funda- 
mentals of ferrous physical met- 
allurgy such as iron-carbon 
phase diagram, transformation 
diagrams, hardenability and the 
effects of alloying elements. 
Heat treating discussed in terms 
of resulting microstructures and 
physical properties. 3 credit 
hours. 

MT 400 Materials Reactions 

Prerequisite: MT 219. Consid- 
eration of chemical reaction in 
the liquid and solid state of im- 
portance to the field of materials 
engineering. Topics include ex- 
tractive metallurgy, internal oxi- 
dation, surface treatment and re- 
cycling of secondary materials. 3 
credit hours. 

MT 450 Special Topics in 
Materials 

Prerequisite: Instructor's con- 
sent. In-depth study of topics 
chosen from areas of particular 
and current interest to materials 
and engineering students. 3 
credit hours. 

MT 500 Research Project 

Prerequisites: MT 331, MT 342, 
senior status. An independent 
design, theoretical analysis or 
laboratory investigation, chosen 
by the student and approved by 
the chairman of the department. 
Work performed by the student 
v^ith frequent critiques by a fac- 
ulty member. 3 credit hours. 



Mechanical 
Engineering 



ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

Fundamentals of orthographic 
projections, pictorial views, aux- 
iliary views, surface intersec- 
tions, dimensioning and toler- 
ancing. Introduction to 

computer-aided drafting in two 
and three dimensions. Construc- 
tion, scaling, and rotation of 
computer-generated wire-frame 
models. 3 credit hours. 

ME 204 Dynamics 

Prerequisites: CE 201, M 118 
(M 118 may be taken concurrent- 
ly). Kinematics and dynamics of 
particles and rigid bodies with 
emphasis on two-dimensional 
problems. Vector representation 
of motion in rectangular, polar 
and natural coordinates. 
Impulse-momentum and work- 
energy theorems. Rigid bodies in 
translation, rotation and general 
plane motion. 3 credit hours. 

ME 215 Instrumentation 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CE 201. Labora- 
tory experiments introducing 
equipment and techniques used 
to measure force, static displace- 
ment, dynamic motion, stress, 
strain, fluid flow, pressure, and 
temperature. Introduction to 
data acquisition, data analysis 
and control using microcomput- 
ers. Laboratory Fee. 2 credit 
hours. 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

Prerequisite: M 118. Classical 
thermodynamics treatment of 
first and second laws. Thermal 
and caloric equations of state. 
Closed and open systems, and 
steady flow processes. Absolute 
temperature, entropy, combined 
first and second laws. Power and 
refrigeration cycles. 3 credit 
hours. 



ME 302 Thermodynamics II 

Prerequisites: CS 102, ME 301, 
M 203 (M 203 may be taken con- 
currently). Extensions and appli- 
cations of first and second laws; 
availability, combustion process, 
phase and chemical equilibrium, 
ideal gas mixtures. Maxwell's re- 
lations. Advanced thermody- 
namic cycles. 3 credit hours. 

ME 307 Solid Mechanics 

Prerequisites: CE 202 and 
M 203. Elastic and plastic behav- 
ior of structural elements such as 
beams, columns and shafts. 
Stress and strain at a point. Plane 
stress and plane strain. Stress 
and strain transformations, 
Mohr's circle. Theories of yield- 
ing and failure. Introduction to 
the fine element method of stress 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

ME 315 Mechanics Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CE 202, ME 204, 
ME 215. Laboratory experiments 
in mechanics of materials, vibra- 
tion analysis, computer-aided 
data acquisition and analysis. 
Emphasis placed on measure- 
ment techniques, report writing, 
and error analysis. Laboratory 
Fee. 2 credit hours. 

ME 330 Fundamentals of 
Mechanical Design 

Prerequisite: ME 307 (may be 
taken concurrently). Introduc- 
tion to basic creative design 
through discussion of the overall 
process, problem definition, 
evaluation, economic analysis 
and social impact. Development 
of fundamental engineering 
analysis involving static and fa- 
tigue failure. Topics include the 
maximum shear and Von Mises 
theories of static design, safety 
factor, Soderberg and Goodman 
diagrams for fatigue design, 
modified endurance limit, relia- 
bility analysis, statistical consid- 
erations and stress concentra- 
tion. Practical applications. 3 
credit hours. 



214 



ME 343 Mechanisms 

Prerequisite: ME 204. Graphic 
and analytical methods for deter- 
mining displacements, velocities 
and accelerations of machine 
components. Application to sim- 
ple mechanisms such as link- 
ages, cams, gears. 3 credit hours. 

ME 344 Mechanics of Vibration 

Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. 
The mathematical relationships 
necessary for the solution of 
problems involving the vibration 
of lumped and continuous sys- 
tems; damping; free and forced 
motions; resonance; isolahon; 
energy methods; balancing; sin- 
gle, two and multiple degrees of 
freedom; vibration measure- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

ME 404 Heat and Mass Transfer 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 421 
(ME 421 may be taken concur- 
rently), M 204. Conduction in 
solids, solution of multi-dimen- 
sional conduction problems, un- 
steady conduction, radiation, 
boundary layer and convection. 
Introduction to mass transfer. 
Lectures include occasional 
demonstrations of convection, 
radiation, heat exchangers. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 405 Advanced Mechanical 
Design 

Prerequisites: ME 421, ME 
431 . Selected advanced topics re- 
lated to the design of machine el- 
ements such as hydrodynamic 
theory of lubrication and princi- 
ples of hydraulic machines with 
application to hydraulic cou- 
plings. 3 credit hours. 

ME 406 Turbomachinery 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 421 . 
Review of basic thermodynamics 
and fluid mechanics. Dimen- 
sional analysis. Specific speed. 
Classification of turbo machines. 
Cavitation. Losses. Definitions 
of efficiency. Theories of turbo- 
machines. Design considera- 
tions for stator blades and rotor 
blades. Computer-aided design. 
3 credit hours. 



ME 407 Solar Energy Thermal 
Processes 

Prerequisite: ME 404 (may be 
taken concurrently). Introduc- 
tion to the fundamentals of solar 
energy thermal processes in- 
cluding solar radiation, flat plate 
and focusing collectors, energy 
storage, hot water heating, cool- 
ing and auxiliary system compo- 
nents. Emphasis on the design 
and evaluation of systems as 
they pertain to commercial and 
residential buildings. 3 credit 
hours. 

ME 408 Advanced Mechanics 

Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. 
Plane and spatial motion of parti- 
cles and rigid bodies, inertia ten- 
sor, relative motion, gyroscopes, 
central force motion. Lagrangian 
and Hamiltonian methods. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 415 Thermo/Fluids 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: ME 215, ME 302, 
ME 421, ME 404 (ME 404 may be 
taken concurrently). A survey of 
experiments and laboratory in- 
vestigations covering the areas 
of fluid mechanics, thermody- 
namics, heat transfer and gas dy- 
namics. Laboratory Fee. 2 credit 
hours. 

ME 421 Fluid Mechanics 

Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. 
Fluid kinematics; continuity 
equation, vector operations. Mo- 
mentum equation for frictionless 
flow; Bernoulli equation with ap- 
plications. Irrotational flow; ve- 
locity potential, Laplace's equa- 
tion, dynamic pressure and lift. 
Stream function for incompress- 
ible flows. Rotational flows; vor- 
ticity; circulation, lift and drag. 
Integral momentum analysis. 
Navier-Stokes equation; stress 
tensor. Newtonian fluid. Bound- 
ary layer approximations. 3 
credit hours. 



ME 422 Introduction to Gas 
Dynamics 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 404, 
ME 421 . Compressible fluid flow 
with emphasis on one-dimen- 
sional ducted steady flows with 
heat transfer, frictional effects, 
shock waves and combined ef- 
fects. Introductory considera- 
tions of two- and three-dimen- 
sional flows. Occasional 
demonstrations accompany the 
lectures. 3 credit hours. 

ME 427 Computer-Aided 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: ME 307, and ME 
344 or ME 404. Integration of 
computers into the design cycle. 
Interactive computer modeling 
and analysis. Geometrical mod- 
eling with wire frame, sur- 
face, and solid models. Finite ele- 
ment modeling and analysis. 
Problems solved involving struc- 
tural, dynamical, and thermal 
characteristics of mechanical de- 
vices. 3 credit hours. 

ME 431 Mechanical Engineering 
Design I 

Prerequisites: ME 330 and se- 
nior status or instructor's con- 
sent. Basic aspects of power 
transmission. Topics include: 
friction train, belt and chain 
drives, gear drive, planetary and 
differential trains. Study of air 
and hydraulic components and 
analysis of machine elements in- 
cluding shafts, springs, clutches, 
bearings, gears. In-house and in- 
dustrial projects in both solids 
and thermal/fluids areas. Stu- 
dent groups determine problem 
requirements and objectives and 
decide on the best design alter- 
natives. Oral project presenta- 
tions. Course available only in 
fall semester. 3 credit hours. 



ME 432 Mechanical Engineering 
Design II 

Prerequisite: ME 431. Projects 
initiated in ME 431 are carried to 
completion. Detailed design 
drawings and prototype con- 
struction, testing and evalua- 
tion. Midterm and final oral pre- 
sentations and comprehensive 
vk^ritten reports. Course available 
only in spring semester. 3 credit 
hours. 

ME 438 Systems Dynamics and 
Control 

Prerequisites: ME 344, ME 421. 
Modeling, analysis and design of 
dynamical systems with feed- 
back. Response and stability 
analysis. Methods include 
Routh-Hurwitz, root locus. Bode 
plots, Nyquist stability criterion. 
Design and compensation meth- 
ods. Applications in mechanical, 
thermal, electrical systems. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 443 Introduction to Flight 
Propulsion 

Prerequisites: ME 422, in- 
structor's consent. A senior 
course designed for those stu- 
dents who intend to work or 
pursue further studies in the 
aerospace field. Among the top- 
ics covered are: detonation and 
deflagration, introductory one- 
dimensional non-steady gas 
flows, basic concepts of turbo- 
machinery and survey of the 
contemporary propulsive de- 
vices. Shock tube, supersonic 
wind tunnel and flame propaga- 
tion demonstrations accompany 
the lectures. 3 credit hours. 

ME 450 Special Topics in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's con- 
sent. In-depth study of topics 
chosen from areas of particular 
and current interest to mechani- 
cal engineering students. 3 credit 
hours. 



ME 512 Senior Seminar 

Open to seniors with chair- 
man's approval. Individual oral 
presentations by students of ma- 
terial researched on topics se- 
lected by students and faculty at 
the beginning of the term. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Consent of fac- 
ulty supervisor and approval of 
departinent chairman. Indepen- 
dent study provides an opportu- 
nity for the student to explore an 
area of special interest under fac- 
ulty supervision. 1-3 credit hours 
per semester with a maximum 
of 12. 



Music 

MU 106 Chorus 

Styles of group singing, sur- 
vey of choral music literature 
from around the world. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 111 Introduction to Music 

Basic forms and styles of music 
in the Western World. Music ap- 
preciation. 3 credit hours. 

MU 112 Introduction to World 
Music 

Non-Western musical styles, 
their cultures and aesthehcs; 
music of the indigenous cultures 
of the Americas and the ad- 
vanced musics of the Near East 
and Far East; emphasis on India, 
the Orient, Southeast Asia, Af- 
rica and Indonesia. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 116 Performance 

Open to all students interested 
in ensembles or private instruc- 
Hon. Students with adequate 
scholastic standing may carry 
this course for credit in addition 
to a normal program. 1-8 credit 
hours; maximum 3 credit hours 
per semester. 



Courses 215 

MU 125 Elementary Music 
Theory 

A one-semester introduchon 
to the basic principles of music, 
primarily for students who wish 
to gain insight into the funda- 
mental structures and workings 
of the art form. Music majors 
who have not successfully 
passed the department place- 
ment examination must enroll in 
MU 125 and MU 125L. Topics in- 
clude notation, scales, key signa- 
tures, Hme signatures, staff rec- 
ognition, intervals, triads. Non- 
music majors are not required to 
enroll in the laboratory. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 125L Elementary Music 
Theory Laboratory 

Exercises in sight-singing, sol- 
fege, melodic and rhythmic dic- 
taHon and music notation. 
Should be taken concurrently 
with MU 125. 1 credit hour. 

MU 150-151 Introduction to 
Music Theory 

Fundamentals of music: nota- 
tion, physical and acoustical 
foundations; harmony and mel- 
ody; modality, tonality, atonal- 
ity; consonance and dissonance; 
tension; introductory composi- 
tion; and ear training. 6 credit 
hours. 

MU 175-176 Musicianship 
I and II 

Prerequisites: MU 111 or MU 
112; MU 150. Development of 
practical skills essential to per- 
formers and ensemble directors: 
ear training, sight singing, dicta- 
tion, transcription, arranging, 
notation, score writing. 6 credit 
hours. 

MU 198-199 Introduction to 
American Music 

Music of the North American 
continent from the Puritans to 
the present day; both European 
and non-European musical tra- 
ditions, with emphasis on twen- 
tieth century developments. 6 
credit hours. 



216 



MU 201-202 Analysis and 
History of European Art Music 

The growth of Western art mu- 
sic from its beginnings to the 
present day. Analysis of musical 
masterpieces on a technical and 
conceptual basis. 6 credit hours. 

MU 211 History of Rock 

Study of rock music as a musi- 
cal tradition and social, political 
and economic phenomenon. 
Ethonomusicological and histor- 
ical examinaHon of rock from its 
pre-1955 roots to the present. 3 
credit hours. 

MU 221 Film Music 

Designed for both music and 
communication majors. Intro- 
duction to the art, science and 
history of musical scores in film. 
Class work includes viewing and 
analysis of films with significant 
cueing and an introduction to 
the musical repertoire available 
to the film maker. 3 credit hours. 

MU 250-251 Theory and 
Composition 

Investigation of music theory 
in various parts of the world, in- 
cluding the Western Art Tradi- 
Hon. Exercises in the composi- 
tion of music within these 
theoretical constructs. Ear train- 
ing and keyboard harmony. 6 
credit hours. 

MU 299 Problems of Music 

Music as an art form through- 
out the world. Music aesthetics 
and its relationship to the perfor- 
mance and composition of mu- 
sic. 3 credit hours. 



MU 300 Studies in Music I 

Area studies in music and its 
parent culture. Cultural theory 
as related to the music; instru- 
ments of the area and their ety- 
mologies; performance practices; 
the social role of music, both art 
and folk. Areas offered depend 
on availability of staff: China, Ja- 
pan, the Near East, the Indian 
subcontinent, Africa, American 
Indian, Afro-American, Latin 
America, the Anglo-Celtic tradi- 
tion and others. 3 credit hours. 

MU 301 Recording 
Fundamentals 

A study of the fundamentals 
of sound recording technique 
and methodology: acoustics mi- 
crophones, microphone place- 
ment, tape formats and formula- 
tions, tape recorders, mono and 
stereo recording, live recording, 
mixers, signal processing. This 
course also emphasizes the im- 
portance of sound aesthetics and 
ethics in the sound recording 
process. 3 credit hours. 

MU 311-312 Multitrack 
Recording I and II 

Prerequisite: MU 301 . Two se- 
mester course in the technique 
and methodology of multitrack 
studio and live recording. In- 
cludes detailed study of multiple 
tracking, mixing consoles, over- 
dubbing, ping-ponging, tape re- 
corders, signal processing, and 
mastering. Laboratory Fee. 6 
credit hours. 

MU 350 Studies in Music II 

Area studies in musical forms; 
their history, evolution, and re- 
sultant metamorphoses, perfor- 
mance practices, and extant 
forms. Areas offered depend 
upon availability of staff. 3 credit 
hours. 



MU 401-402 Recording Seminar/ 
Project I and II 

Prerequisite: MU 312. Each 
student will complete a profes- 
sional quality recording produc- 
tion or research and develop- 
ment project. Work may consist 
of internship or Co-op experi- 
ence in a professional recording 
studio. Seminar will also include 
presentations on areas of profes- 
sional interest such as career op- 
portunities and new develop- 
ment in studio technique and 
technology. Laboratory Fee. 6 
credit hours. 

MU 416 Advanced Performance 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department staff and a faculty 
adviser. Preparation and presen- 
tation of an instrumental or vocal 
performance indicating suffi- 
cient proficiency to warrant the 
awarding of a degree in music. 3 
credit hours. 

MU 500 Seminar in Advanced 
Research 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Bibliographical stud- 
ies of major world music areas; 
investigation of current and his- 
torical musicological theories, 
analysis and criticism of musico- 
logical area Hteratures. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 550 Studies in Urban Ethnic 
Music 

Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. The music tradition of 
inner-city ethnic groups; empha- 
sis on the operation of the oral 
tradition in the preservation of 
cultural values and customs as 
evidenced through music. Class- 
room discussion will be balanced 
by field research in the urban 
vicinity. 3 credit hours. 

MU 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student 
under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of 
personal interest. This course 
must be initiated by the student. 
1-3 credit hours per semester 
with a maximum of 12. 



Courses 217 



Occupational Safety 
and Health 

SH 100 Safety Organization and 
Management 

History and development of 
the safety movement, nature 
and extent of the problem, devel- 
opment of worker's compensa- 
tion, development of safety pro- 
grams, cost analysis techniques, 
locating and defining accident 
sources, analysis of the human 
element, employee training, 
medical services and facilities 
and the what and how of the Oc- 
cupational Safety and Health 
Act. 3 credit hours. 

SH 110 Accident Conditions and 
Controls 

Prerequisite: SH 100. Mechan- 
ical hazards, machine and equip- 
ment guarding, boilers and pres- 
sure vessels, structural hazards, 
materials handling hazards and 
equipment use, electrical haz- 
ards, personal protective equip- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

SH 200 Elements of Industrial 
Hygiene 

Prerequisites: PH 103, SH 110, 
CH 103, or CH 115. Analysis of 
toxic substances and their effect 
on the human body. Analysis 
and effect of chemical hazards, 
physical hazards of electromag- 
netic and ionizing radiation, ab- 
normal temperature and pres- 
sure, noise, ultrasonic and low- 
frequency vibration; sampling 
techniques including detector 
tubes, particulate sampling, 
noise measurement and radia- 
tion detection; governmental 
and industrial hygiene stan- 
dards and codes. 3 credit hours. 



SH 201 Evaluation of the 
Occupational Environment 

Prerequisite: SH 200. Current 
methods and techniques used in 
evaluating the occupational en- 
vironment. InstrucHon on how 
to use the instruments necessary 
to measure ventilation, non-ion- 
izing radiation, airborne contam- 
inants, noise and heat stress. In- 
struction on how to present data 
and prepare reports will also be 
included. 3 credit hours. 

SH 210 Sound-Hearing-Noise 

Prerequisite: SH 200. An anal- 
ysis of three major factors associ- 
ated with the noise issue viz, the 
physics of sound, the biological 
phenomenon of hearing, and the 
engineering processes of noise 
abatement including a review of 
the OSHA legal standards for 
noise exposure. 3 credit hours. 

SH 308 Industrial Fire 
Prevention I 

(See course description under 
PS 308 on pg. 199.) 

SH 309 Industrial Fire 
Prevention II 

(See course description under 
PS 309 on pg. 199.) 

SH 400 Occupational Safety and 
Health Legal Standards 

Prerequisite: SH 100. All as- 
pects of the legal constraints ap- 
plicable to the occupational 
safety field. Includes OSHA, 
federal laws not under OSHA ju- 
risdicrion, selected state legisla- 
tion, current and pending prod- 
uct liability laws, environmental 
protection law and fire safety 
codes. Emphasizes parricular 
legal areas as requested. 3 credit 
hours. 



SH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. Opportunity for the 
student under the direction of a 
faculty member to explore an 
area of interest. This course must 
be initiated by the student. 1-3 
credit hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 



Philosophy 



PL 201 Philosophical Methods 

The nature of reality and how 
it may be known, according to 
the great thinkers of the Occi- 
dent and the Orient. 3 credit 
hours. 

PL 205 Classical Philosophy 

The origins of philosophy and 
the conrinuing influence of clas- 
sical thought on the develop- 
ment of ideas. 3 credit hours. 

PL 206 Modern Philosophy: 
Descartes to the Present 

Philosophical theories that 
have dominated the modern 
age. Stress on a central figure of 
the period. 3 credit hours. 

PL 210 Logic 

Modern symbolic logic and its 
applications. 3 credit hours. 

PL 215 Nature of the Self 

Invesrigation of personal iden- 
tity, human nature and the mind 
from ancient, modern. Western 
and Eastern perspectives. 3 
credit hours. 

PL 222 Ethics 

How shall one live? Critical ex- 
amination of answers proposed 
by classic and modem philoso- 
phers of the major world tradi- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

PL 223 Ethics and Business 

How ethics and other values 
funcrion in their relarion to busi- 
ness enterprise. 3 credit hours. 



218 

PL 240 Philosophy of Science 
and Technology 

Scientific method, the logic of 
scientific explanation, the appli- 
cation of science to practical 
problems and questions peculiar 
to the social sciences. 3 credit 
hours. 

PL 250 Philosophy of Religion 

An examination of some philo- 
sophical noHons used in reli- 
gious discourse, such as mean- 
ing, truth, faith, being, God, the 
holy. 3 credit hours. 

PL 256 Analysis and Criticism of 
the Arts 

The language used to talk 
about works of art: form, con- 
tent, expression, value and the 
ontological status of the art ob- 
ject. 3 credit hours. 

PL 320 Mathematical Logic 

Prerequisite: PL 210, mathe- 
matics major or instructor's con- 
sent. The nature of logic and its 
relationship to mathematics, in- 
cluding implicahons for com- 
puter intelligence. 3 credit 
hours. 

PL 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student 
under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of in- 
terest. This course must be iniH- 
ated by the student. 1-3 credit 
hours with a maximum of 12. 



Physics 



PH 100 Introductory Physics 
with Laboratory 

A one-semester introduction 
to the science of physics primar- 
ily for liberal arts, business and 
hotel and tourism students. The 
course provides a broad, non- 
mathematical understanding of 
the basic laws of nature, their ap- 
plication to our everyday lives 
and their impact on our techno- 
logical society. Laboratory Fee. 4 
credit hours. 



PH 101 Energy — Present and 
Future 

Intended primarily for busi- 
ness and liberal arts students. 
Explores the nature, role and 
economic impact of energy in 
our society. Topics include: the 
nature and growth of energy 
consumption, physical limits to 
energy production and con- 
sumption, environmental effects 
and comparisons of energy alter- 
nahves. Special emphasis on the 
technical, environmental and 
economic aspects of nuclear 
power as well as energy sources 
of the future such as fast breeder 
reactors, fusion, solar and geo- 
thermal power. 3 credit hours. 

PH 103-104 General Physics I 
and II 

Primarily for life science ma- 
jors with no calculus back- 
ground. Basic concepts of classi- 
cal physics: fundamental laws of 
mechanics, heat, electromagne- 
tism, optics, and conservation 
principles. Introduction to mod- 
ern physics: relativity and quan- 
tum theory, atomic, nuclear and 
solid-state physics. Application 
of physical principles to life sci- 
ences. 6 credit hours. 

PH 105-106 General Physics 
Laboratory I and II 

Should be taken concurrently 
with PH 103-104. Laboratory 
Fee. 2 credit hours. 

PH 130 Radiation Safety 

Intended for students in occu- 
pational safety and hygiene, fire 
science, forensic science and re- 
lated fields, as well as science 
and engineering students with 
interests in this area. Topics in- 
clude: the nature of radiation 
and radioactivity, the interaction 
of radiation with matter, biologi- 
cal effects of radiation, detection 
and measurement of radiation, 
shielding considerations, dosim- 
etry, and standards for personal 
protection. 3 credit hours. 



PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and 
Waves with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: M 117. Introduc- 
tory course for physical science 
and engineering majors. Kine- 
matics, Newton's laws, conser- 
vation principles for momen- 
tum, energy and angular 
momentum. Thermal physics. 
Basic properties of waves, sim- 
ple harmonic motion, super-po- 
sition principle, interference 
phenomena and sound. Labora- 
tory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and 
Optics with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: PH 150, M 118. 
Basic concepts of electricity and 
magnetism; Coulomb's law, 
electric field and potential. 
Gauss's law. Ohm's law, Kir- 
choff's rules, capacitance, mag- 
netic field, Ampere's law, Fara- 
day's law of induction. 
Maxwell's equations, electro- 
magnetic waves. Fundamentals 
of optics; light, laws of reflection 
and refraction, interference and 
diffraction phenomena, polar- 
ization, gratings, lenses and op- 
tical instruments. Laboratory 
Fee. 4 credit hours. 

PH 207 Engineering Physics 

Prerequisites: One full year of 
non-calculus physics with labo- 
ratories, two semesters of calcu- 
lus. A one-semester course pri- 
marily for engineering transfer 
students who had one-year non- 
calculus physics sequence in 
two-year colleges and technical 
schools. All the major topics of 
PH 150-PH 205 are covered with 
an ample use of calculus. PH 207 
should not be used as a technical 
elective. 4 credit hours. 

PH 211 Modern Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Modem 
physics fundamentals. Twen- 
tieth-century developments in 
the theory of relativity and the 
quantum theory. Atomic, nu- 
clear, solid-state and elementary 
particle physics. 3 credit hours. 



PH 270 Thermal Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 103 or PH 
150. Basic thermodynamics and 
its applications. Major emphasis 
on the efficiency of energy con- 
version and utihzation. Topics 
include: the laws of thermody- 
namics, entropy, efficiency of 
heat engines, solar energy, the 
energy balance of the earth, en- 
ergy systems of the future, eco- 
nomics of energy use. 3 credit 
hours. 

PH 280 Lasers 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Laser 
theory, holography, construc- 
tion and application to latest en- 
gineering and scientific uses. 3 
credit hours. 

PH 285 Modern Optics 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Intro- 
duction to optical theories. Top- 
ics on the latest developments in 
optics. Application to life sci- 
ences and engineering. 3 credit 
hours. 

PH 301 Analytical Mechanics 

Prerequisites: M 150, M 204, 
or instructor's consent. Interme- 
diate analytical mechanics. Stat- 
ics and dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies. Emphasis on the 
theory of motion under central 
forces and on the use of the gen- 
eralized coordinates; introduc- 
tion to an elementary Lagranian 
and Hamiltonian formalism; 
small vibrations. 3 credit hours. 

PH 351 Intermediate Electricity 
and Magnetism 

Prerequisites: PH 205, M 204. 
Electric field and potential using 
vector field formalism. Bound- 
ary' conditions. Poisson's and 
Laplace's equations. Electromag- 
netic fields in cavities and 
weaveguides. Electromagnetic 
waves. 3 credit hours. 



PH 400 Statistical Mechanics 

Prerequisite: instructor's con- 
sent. An introductory course in 
classical and quantum statistical 
mechanics. The canonical en- 
semble: Maxwell-Boltzmann, 
Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac 
statistics and their applications; 
statistical interpretation of ther- 
modynamics; transport pro- 
cesses. 3 credit hours. 

PH 401 Atomic Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211. Struc- 
ture and interactions of atomic 
systems including Schrodinger's 
equation, atomic bonding, scat- 
tering and mean free path, radia- 
tive transitions and laser theory. 
3 credit hours. 

PH 404 Senior Project 

Open to senior physics ma- 
jors. Individual projects in ex- 
perimental or theoretical physics 
to be carried out under direct su- 
pervision of a faculty advisor. 1- 
6 credit hours. 

PH 406 Solid-State Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211. Intro- 
duction to the physics of solids 
with emphasis on crystal struc- 
ture, lattice vibrations, band the- 
ory, semi-conductor, magnetism 
and superconductivity. Applica- 
tions to semiconductor devices 
and metallurgy. 3 credit hours. 

PH 415 Nuclear Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or in- 
structor's consent. Elementary 
nuclear physics. Nuclear struc- 
ture, natural radioactivity, in- 
duced radioactivity nuclear 
forces and reactions, fission and 
fusion, reactors and topics of 
special interest. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 219 

PH 451 Elementary Quantum 
Mechanics 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or in- 
structor's consent. An elemen- 
tary treatment of nonrelativistic 
quantum mechanics. Schrodin- 
ger's equation with its applica- 
tions to atomic and nuclear struc- 
ture; collision theory; radiation; 
introductory perturbation the- 
ory. 3 credit hours. 

PH 470 Theory of Relativity 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or in- 
structor's consent. Introduction 
to Einstein's theory of relativity. 
Special theory of relativity; Lo- 
rentz transformations, relativis- 
tic mechanics and electromag- 
netism. General theory of 
relativity; equivalence principle, 
Einstein's three tests, graviton, 
black hole and cosmology. 3 
credit hours. 

PH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. Opportunity for the 
student under the direction of a 
faculty member to explore an 
area of personal interest. This 
course must be initiated by the 
student. 1-3 credit hours per se- 
mester with a maximum of 12. 



Political Science 

f Institute of Law and Public 

Affairs courses 

PS 101 Introduction to Politics 

A basic course introducing 
students to the discipline of po- 
litical science and its subjects: 
political theory, law, national 
government, international rela- 
tions, comparative government 
and political economy. 3 credit 
hours. 



PH 373 Advanced Laboratory 

Prerequisite: PH 211. Selected 
experiments in atomic, nuclear, 
and solid state physics. Labora- 
tory Fee. 2 credit hours. 



220 



PS 121 American Government 
and Politics 

A basic study of the American 
political system. Constitutional 
foundations, the political cul- 
ture. Congress, the Presidency, 
the judicial system, poHHcal par- 
ties, interest groups, news me- 
dia, individual liberties, federal- 
ism, the policy-making process. 
3 credit hours. 

PS 122 State and Local 
Government and Politics 

Problems of cities, revenue 
sharing, community power 
structures, welfare, public 
safety, the state political party, 
big-city political machines, inter- 
est groups, state legislatures, the 
governor, the mayor, courts and 
judicial reform. 3 credit hours. 

PS 203 American Political 
Thought 

Pre-revolutionary and revolu- 
tionary political thought; classi- 
cal conservatism, liberalism, 
Jacksonian democracy, civil dis- 
obedience, social Darwinism, 
progressive individualism and 
pluralism. 3 credit hours. 

PS 205 The Politics of the Black 
Movement in America 

The political development of 
the Black movement in America 
emphasizing ideological, legal 
and cultural perspectives. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 216 Urban Government and 
Politics 

A study of the urban political 
process. Structures and organi- 
zations of urban governments, 
decision making, public policy, 
the "urban crisis," crime and law 
enforcement, party politics and 
elections, taxation and spending 
patterns, environmental prob- 
lems, management of urban de- 
velopment. 3 credit hours. 



PS 222 United States Foreign 
Policy 

An examination of the global 
foreign policy of the United 
States and of the process of 
policy-making involving govern- 
mental and non-governmental 
actors. A review of the political, 
economic, military and cultural 
tracks of policy. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 224 Public Attitudes and 
Public Policy 

A study of the sources of mass 
political attitudes and behavior 
and their effect upon public pol- 
icy. The course will examine the 
techniques for influencing opin- 
ion including propaganda and 
mass media communications. 3 
credit hours. 

tPS 226 Family Law 

A study of legal relations be- 
tween husband and wife includ- 
ing marriage, annulment, di- 
vorce, alimony, separation, 
adoption, custody arrangements 
and basic procedures of family 
law litigation. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 228 Public Interest Groups 

Examination of American 
group institutions of the Ameri- 
can political culture. Emphasis 
on the legal nature, purpose and 
function of each operational or- 
ganization in the political pro- 
cess. 3 credit hours. 

+PS 229 Legal Communications 

Familiarization with the kinds 
of legal documents and written 
instruments employed by parti- 
cipants in the legal process. Re- 
cognization and understanding 
of the purpose of writs, com- 
plaints, briefs, memoranda, con- 
tracts, wills and motions. 3 credit 
hours. 



tPS 230 Anglo-American 
Jurisprudence 

Surveys ideas about the nature 
of law. Legal philosophers exam- 
ined include Plato, Aristotle, St. 
Thomas Aquinas, John Austin, 
William Blackstone, Benjamin 
Cardozo, L.A. Hart and Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. The contribu- 
tion to legal theory made by vari- 
ous schools of jurisprudence 
(e.g., positivism, legal realism). 
3 credit hours. 

tPS 231 Judicial Behavior 

Examination of the American 
court system as a political policy- 
making body. Topics considered 
include: the structure of the judi- 
cial system, the influence of so- 
ciological and psychological fac- 
tors on judicial behavior and the 
nature and impact of the judicial 
decision-making process. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

PS 232 The Politics of the First 
Amendment 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Examina- 
tion of the political implications 
of the First Amendment free- 
doms of speech, press and reli- 
gions; Supreme Court adapta- 
tion of the First Amendment to 
changing political social condi- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 238 Legal Procedure I 

This course is designed to pro- 
vide a practical knowledge of 
civil procedure for the pre-law 
and paralegal student. 3 credit 
hours. 

tPS 239 Legal Procedure II 

An introduction to litigation 
techniques and procedures, in- 
cluding skills needed to negoti- 
ate for civil and criminal actions. 
3 credit hours. 



Courses 221 



tPS 240 Legal Bibliography and 
Resources 

An introduction to legal biblio- 
graphic materials. Students will 
learn how to use various kinds 
of law books in solving research 
problems incident to advising 
clients and trying and appealing 
cases. The function of court re- 
ports, statutes, codes, digests, 
citators, loose-leaf services and 
treatises will be discussed. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 241 International Relations 

Forces and structures operat- 
ing in the modern nation state 
system, the foreign policy pro- 
cess, decision-making process, 
the impact of decolonization on 
traditional interstate behavior, 
economic and political develop- 
ments since World War 11. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 243 International Law and 
Organization 

Prerequisite: PS 241. Tradi- 
tional and modern approach to 
international law and organiza- 
tion; major emphasis on the con- 
tribution of law and organization 
to the establishment of a world 
of law and world peace. The 
League of Nations system and 
the United Nations system are 
analyzed. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 244 Estates and Trusts 

An examination of the legal 
principles and techniques of 
effective estate planning and 
administration. Topics covered 
include inheritance statutes, 
preparation and execution of 
wills, and record keeping prac- 
tices. 3 credit hours. 

PS 261 Modern Political 
Analysis 

Introduction to the new ap- 
proach of political analysis, per- 
sonality and politics, political so- 
cialization, role and group 
theory, decision making, sys- 
tems analysis and political vio- 
lence. 3 credit hours. 



PS 281 Comparative Political 
Systems: Asia 

Traditional and modern politi- 
cal and social structures of 
China, Japan and Korea and 
other Asian states including the 
function of the political system 
within each country. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 282 Comparative Political 
Systems: Europe 

Political characteristics of 
modern European states. Em- 
phasis on political, social and 
economic institutions, struc- 
tures, the impact of modern Eu- 
ropean developments on inte- 
gration. France, Germany, 
United Kingdom, USSR, Yugo- 
slavia, Czechoslovakia, Sweden 
and Switzerland. 3 credit hours. 

PS 283 Comparative Political 
Systems: Latin America 

Political modernization, devel- 
opment in Latin America, politi- 
cal institutions, national iden- 
tity, leadership, integration, 
political socialization and politi- 
cal ideologies. 3 credit hours. 

PS 285 Comparative Political 
Systems: Middle East 

Colonial background; legal 
framework of nationhood; politi- 
cal, social and economic struc- 
tures of development of selected 
countries are examined. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 304 Political Parties 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Voting 
and electoral behavior; nomina- 
tions and campaign strategy; 
pressure groups; political party 
structure and functions of the 
party system in the American 
political community. 3 credit 
hours. 



PS 308 Legislative Process 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Legisla- 
tive process in the American po- 
litical system; legislative func- 
tions; selection and recruitment 
of candidates; legislative leader- 
ship, the committee system; lob- 
byists, decision making; legisla- 
tive norms, folkways and 
legislative-executive relations. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 309 The American 
Presidency 

The role of the President as 
commander-in-chief, legislative 
leader, party leader, administra- 
tor, manager of the economy, di- 
rector of foreign policy and advo- 
cate of social justice; nature of 
presidential decision making, 
authority, power, influence and 
personality. 3 credit hours. 

+PS 326 Real Estate Law 

A variety of legal skills in real 
estate law. Special attention 
given to title, operations, mort- 
gage, deeds, leases, property 
taxes, closing procedures and 
documents. 3 credit hours. 

+PS 328 Legal Management and 
Administrative Skills 

An examination of the proce- 
dures and systems necessary to 
run a law office efficiently. Stu- 
dents will learn such administra- 
tive skills as how to interview 
clients, conduct legal corre- 
spondence and maintain legal 
records. Proven management 
techniques for keeping track of 
filing dates and fees, court dock- 
ets and calendars are also exam- 
ined. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 330 Legal Investigation 

Examines skills needed to con- 
duct investigations that are a 
routine part of the practice of law 
such as principles of fact-gather- 
ing in a wide range of cases (e.g. , 
criminal, divorce, custody, 
housing). 3 credit hours. 



222 



PS 331 Theory and the Supreme 
Court 

An examination of the ways in 
which the Supreme Court exer- 
cises judicial review with parHc- 
ular emphasis on the various 
theories of review as they have 
evolved from John Marshall to 
the present. 3 credit hours. 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Princi- 
ples and concepts of the United 
States Constitution as revealed 
in leading decisions of the Su- 
preme Court and the process of 
judicial review. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 340 Campaign 
Management: Procedures and 
Operations 

A study of the procedure and 
operaHon of the contemporary 
political campaign including is- 
sue development, voter registra- 
tion, canvassing, media usage, 
fundraising, scheduling, cam- 
paign data, etc. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 341 Campaign 
Management: Structure and 
Organization 

Exploration of the structure, 
organization and management 
of the campaign operation and 
the handling, roles and tasks of 
the campaign personnel. 3 credit 
hours. 

tPS 344 Campaign 
Management: Survey Research, 
Polling and Computers 

A study of the uses and the in- 
terpretation of survey research, 
polhng projects, computer tech- 
niques, and their application to 
political campaigns. 3 credit 
hours. 



tPS 346 Campaign 
Management: Financing and 
Election Laws 

Exploration of the methods 
used to finance a political cam- 
paign; the nature of campaign 
costs; the role of political action 
committees; the effects of cam- 
paign finance laws; and the tech- 
nical aspects and political impli- 
cations of elections laws at the 
federal, state and local levels. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 350 Public Policy: U.S. 
National Security 

The development and opera- 
tion of U.S. military and national 
security policy from George 
Washington to the present with 
the major emphasis on the twen- 
tieth century and the post-World 
War II period. 3 credit hours. 

PS 355 Terrorism* 

Examination of the modem 
application of terrorism in inter- 
national affairs paying special at- 
tention to ideological and infra- 
structure determinants. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 390 Political Modernization 
(Honors) 

Comparative analysis of politi- 
cal change and development. 
Political transition, political inte- 
gration and nation building; in- 
stitutional developments; politi- 
cal parties; military elites; youth; 
intellectuals; the bureaucracy; 
economic development; and po- 
litical culture. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 415 Internship in Legal 
and Public Affairs 

Students will have the oppor- 
tunity to work as paraprofes- 
sionals in law offices, govern- 
ment agencies, and party 
organizations, and to share their 
experiences with other interns in 
legal and public affairs. Permis- 
sion of the instructor is required. 
3 credit hours. 



tPS 430 Computers and the Law 

An analysis of the ways in 
which the advent of the com- 
puter has affected law and the 
legal profession. Students will 
explore methods of using com- 
puters for legal research, the ef- 
fects of computers on criminol- 
ogy and the administration of 
justice, the impact of mass data 
banks on the right to privacy and 
the freedom of choice. 3 credit 
hours. 

tPS 440 Legal Research 

Prerequisite: PS 240. Practical 
experience in researching and 
writing on realistic legal prob- 
lems. Specific written assign- 
ments make use of all the library 
tools. How to prepare and ana- 
lyze legal memoranda and 
briefs. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 450 Campaign 
Management: Internship 

Actual work experience in 
campaign management. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 461 Political Theory: Ancient 
and Medieval 

Foundations of Western politi- 
cal thought from the Greek, Ro- 
man and medieval experiences 
as it applies to the total discipline 
of political science. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 462 Political Theory: Modem 
and Contemporary 

A continuation of the study of 
political thought from the High 
Middle Ages to the contempo- 
rary theorists. 3 credit hours. 

PS 494-498 Studies in Political 
Science 

Special studies on a variety of 
current problems and special- 
ized areas in the field not avail- 
able on the regular curriculum. 3 
credit hours per course. 



Courses 223 



PS 499-500 Senior Seminar in 
Political Science 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
department chairman. Construc- 
tion and preparation of an indi- 
vidual research project in politi- 
cal science and the presentahon 
of that project in oral form within 
the seminar and in written form 
as the seminar thesis. Required 
of all political science majors. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 599 Independent Study 

Directed research on special 
topics to be decided upon in con- 
sultaHon with the chairman of 
the department. 3 credit hours. 

*Submitted to the University Curricu- 
lum Committee Process 



Psychology 



P 111 Introduction to 
Psychology 

Understanding human behav- 
ior. Motivation, emotion, learn- 
ing, personality development, 
intelligence, as they relate to nor- 
mal and deviant behavior. 
Applying psychological knowl- 
edge to everyday personal and 
societal problems. 3 credit hours. 

P 211 Psychology of Effective 
Living 

Prerequisite: P 111. Psycho- 
logical principles and research as 
they apply to the problems of ad- 
justment and competence. Anal- 
ysis of problems and patterns in- 
volved in effective psychosocial 
functioning. 3 credit hours. (This 
course is for personal enrich- 
ment only and cannot be used to 
satisfy requirements for the psy- 
chology major or minor.) 



P 212 Business and Industrial 
Psychology 

Prerequisite: Pill. Psycholog- 
ical principles and research as 
they apply to the problems of 
working with people in organi- 
zations. Analysis of problems 
and decisions in the use of hu- 
man resources, including selec- 
tion and placement, criterion 
measurement, job design, moti- 
vation. 3 credit hours. 

P 216 Psychology of Human 
Development 

Prerequisite: P 111. Human 
development over the life cy- 
cle — conception through death, 
the changing societal and institu- 
tional framework, key concepts 
and theoretical approaches, 
understanding development 
through biography, child rearing 
and socialization here and 
abroad. 3 credit hours. 

P 301 Statistics for Behavioral 
Sciences 

Prerequisite: M 127. Concepts 
and assumptions underlying sta- 
tistical methods essential to de- 
sign and interpretation of re- 
search on human subjects. 
Fundamental descriptive and in- 
ferential methods. (This course 
is cross-listed with M 228 Ele- 
mentary Statistics.) 4 credit 
hours. 

P 305 Experimental Methods in 
Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 301. Methods 
of designing and analyzing psy- 
chological experiments. The 
scientific method as applied to 
psychology. Consideration of re- 
search techniques, experimental 
variables, design problems, data 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 



P 306 Psychology Laboratory 

Prerequisite: P 305. Group 
and individual experiments to be 
carried out by students. Re- 
search techniques for studying 
learning, motivation, concept 
formation. Data analysis and re- 
port writing. Offered only in 
spring semester of odd-num- 
bered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 315 Human and Animal 
Learning 

Prerequisite: P 111. Different 
types of human and animal 
learning. Learning as an adap- 
tive mechanism. Psychological 
principles underlying learning. 
Practical applications of learning 
principles. 3 credit hours. 

P 316 Health Psychology 

Prerequisite: Pill. The role of 
psychological factors in the 
cause and prevention of physical 
illness. The modification of un- 
healthful behaviors. The study 
of stress and the management of 
stress. The nature of pain. In- 
cludes demonstrations of hyp- 
nosis, biofeedback, and progres- 
sive relaxation. 3 credit hours. 

P 321 Social Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 111, SO 113. 
The interdependence of social 
organizations and behavior. The 
interrelationships between role 
systems and personality; atti- 
tude analysis, development and 
modification; group interaction 
analysis; social conformity; so- 
cial class and human behavior. 
Offered only in the spring se- 
mester of odd-numbered years. 
3 credit hours. (Same as SO 320). 

P 330 Introduction to 
Community Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 111. Key con- 
cepts of community psychology/ 
community mental health. Com- 
munity problems, needs and re- 
sources. The helping relation- 
ship. Intervention techniques. 
Programming services. Under- 
standing behavioral differences. 
Careers in community psychol- 
ogy. 3 credit hours. 



224 



P 331-332 Undergraduate 
Practicum in Community/ 
Clinical Psychology 

Corequisites: P 330 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Super- 
vised field experience in commu- 
nity psychology/mental health 
settings. Exploration of service 
delivery. Development of basic 
repertoire of helping skills. Be- 
havioral log. Project reporting. 
Understanding helping roles at 
individual, small group and in- 
stitutional levels. 1-6 credit 
hours with a maximum of 3 
credit hours per semester. 

P 336 Abnormal Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 111. Psycho- 
logical and organic factors in per- 
sonality disorganization and de- 
viant behavior. Psychodynamics 
and classifications of abnormal 
behavior. Disorders of child- 
hood, adolescence and old age. 
Evaluation of therapeutic meth- 
ods. 3 credit hours. 

P 341 Psychological Theory 

Prerequisite: P 111. Contem- 
porary theory in psychology. 
Emphasis on those theories 
which have most influenced 
thinking and research in sensa- 
Hon, perception, learning, moti- 
vation, personality. Offered only 
in fall semester of odd-num- 
bered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 350 Human Assessment 

Prerequisite: P 301. Basic prin- 
ciples of measurement, applied 
to problems of the construction, 
administration and interpreta- 
tion of standardized tests in psy- 
chological, educational and in- 
dustrial settings. Offered only in 
fall semester of odd-numbered 
years. 3 credit hours. 



P 351 Behavior Therapies 

Prerequisite: P 111. Principles 
of therapeutic behavior manage- 
ment. Alteration of maladaptive 
behavior patterns in institu- 
tional, neighborhood, home, ed- 
ucational and social settings by 
operant and respondent rein- 
forcement techniques. Habit 
management in oneself and 
one's children. Offered only in 
the spring semester of even- 
numbered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 355 Organizational Behavior 

Prerequisite: P 111. Theoreti- 
cal underpinning for the major 
approaches to understanding 
motivation and leadership be- 
havior in organizations. Com- 
parative evaluation of incentives 
such as salary and career growth 
potential as they relate to sus- 
tained motivation. The pro- 
cesses involved in effective lead- 
ership. Integration of motivation 
and leadership concepts as they 
affect the quality of working life. 
Offered only in the fall semester 
of even-numbered years. 3 credit 
hours. 

P 356 Psychology of Personnel 
Training and Development 

Prerequisite: P 111. Ap- 
proaches to the identification of 
training needs in a variety of or- 
ganizational settings. The effec- 
tiveness of the major training 
methodologies and techniques 
for assessing training program 
outcomes. Individual differences 
in response to various learning 
strategies. Offered only in the 
spring semester of odd-num- 
bered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 361 Physiological Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 111; BI 121 
and BI 122. Endocrinological, 
neural, sensory and response 
mechanisms involved in learn- 
ing, motivation, adjustment, 
emotion and sensation. Offered 
only in spring semester of even- 
numbered years. 3 credit hours. 



P 370 Psychology of Personality 

Prerequisites: P 111, junior 
class standing. Theory and 
method in the understanding of 
normal and deviant aspects of 
personality; theories of Freud, 
Jung, Rogers, neo-Freudians 
and others. 3 credit hours. 

P 375 Foundations of Clinical/ 
Counseling Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 336. Founda- 
tions of clinical/counseling psy- 
chology will review the human- 
istic, psychoanalytic, and 
behaviorist views on the emer- 
gence and treatment of psycho- 
pathology. The fit between the- 
ory and technique will be 
explored. 3 credit hours. 

P 480-484 Selected Topics in 
Psychology 

3 credit hours. 

P 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of fac- 
ulty member and chairman of 
department. Opportunity for the 
student under the direction of a 
faculty member to explore an 
area of personal interest. This 
course must be initiated by the 
student. 1-3 credit hours per se- 
mester with a maximum of 12. 



Public 
Administration 

PA 101 Introduction to Public 
Administration 

The nature of and problems in- 
volved in the administration of 
public services at the federal, 
state, regional and local levels. 3 
credit hours. 

PA 302 Public Administration 
Systems and Procedures 

The major staff management 
functions in government and in 
non-profit agencies: planning, 
budgeting, scheduling and work 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 225 



PA 305 Institutional Budgeting 
and Planning 

Budgeting as an institutional 
planning tool, as a cost control 
device and as a program analysis 
mechanism is stressed. Atten- 
tion is given to the salary ex- 
pense budget, the revenue bud- 
get, the capital budget and the 
cash budget. 3 credit hours. 

PA 307 Urban and Regional 
Management 

Methods and analysis of decis- 
ion-making related to urban and 
regional problems. Topics in- 
clude housing, land use, eco- 
nomic development, transporta- 
tion, pollution, conservation and 
urban renewal. 3 credit hours. 

PA 308 Health Care Delivery 
Systems 

An examination of the health 
care delivery systems in the 
U.S., including contemporary, 
economic, organizational, fi- 
nancing, manpower, cost and 
national health insurance issues. 
3 credit hours. 

PA 404 Public Policy Analysis 

Using the public perspecHve, 
examines the nature of the public 
policy process from policy for- 
mulation through policy termi- 
narion. Major emphasis on the 
techniques commonly used in 
analyzing public policy includ- 
ing cost/benefit analysis and 
comparison of expected and ac- 
tual outcomes. An opportunity 
to gain "hands on" experience in 
the analysis and evaluation of 
public policy. 3 credit hours. 

PA 405 Public Personnel 
Practices 

Study of the civil service sys- 
tems of the federal, state and lo- 
cal governments including a sys- 
tematic review of the methods of 
recruitment, evaluation, promo- 
tion, discipline, control and re- 
moval. 3 credit hours. 



PA 408 Collective Bargaining in 
the Public Sector 

Analysis of collective bargain- 
ing in the public sector, with em- 
phasis on legislation pertaining 
to government employees. 3 
credit hours. 

PA 490 Public Health 
Administration 

An examination of public 
health activities, including pub- 
lic health organization, environ- 
mental health, disease control, 
use of information systems and 
social services. 3 credit hours. 

PA 501 Public Administration 
Internship 

Prerequisite: consent of the co- 
ordinator. Monitorial field expe- 
rience with public and not-for- 
profit agencies. Minimum of 3 
credit hours. 

PA 512 Seminar in Public 
Administration 

Selected topics related to pub- 
lic administration are chosen. 3 
credit hours. 

PA 599 Independent Study 

Independent study on a proj- 
ect of interest to the student un- 
der the direction of a faculty 
member approved by the depart- 
ment chairman. 3 credit hours. 



Quantitative 
Analysis 

QA 118 Business Mathematics 

Prerequisite: QA qualifying 
exam. An introduction to mathe- 
matical programming and prob- 
ability and statistics. Topics in- 
clude solutions to linear 
equations, breakeven analysis, 
graphical solutions to linear pro- 
gramming problems, mathemat- 
ical modeling, measures of cen- 
tral tendency and variability and 
basic probability concepts. The 
course presents introductory 
material to both QA 128 and 
Q A 216. 3 credit hours. 



QA 128 Quantitative 
Techniques in Management 

Prerequisite: QA 118. An in- 
troduction to quantitative tech- 
niques in management. Topics 
include linear programming, as- 
signment problems, transporta- 
tion algorithms, network and in- 
ventory models, and decision 
theory. 3 credit hours. 

QA 216 Probability and 
Statistics 

Prerequisite: QA 128 or equiv- 
alent. A course in elementary 
probability and statistical con- 
cepts with emphasis on data 
analysis and presentation, fre- 
quency distributions, probability 
theory, probability distributions, 
sampling distributions, statisti- 
cal inference, hypothesis testing, 
the T, chi-square and F distribu- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

QA 250 Quantitative 
Techniques II 

Prerequisites: QA 216. Ad- 
vanced applications of quantita- 
tive techiiiques to the solution of 
business problems. Topics 
include: classical optimization 
techniques, non-linear program- 
ming, topics in mathematical pro- 
gramming, and graph theory. 3 
credit hours. 



QA 333 Advanced Statistics 

Prerequisites: QA 216. Ad- 
vanced statistical concepts and 
statistical methods relating to 
business. Topics include: regres- 
sion and correlation, multiple 
regression and analysis of vari- 
ance (ANOVA). 3 credit hours. 



Russian 



RU 101-102 Elementary Russian 

Stresses pronunciation, aural 
and reading comprehension, ba- 
sic conversation and the funda- 
mental principles of grammar. 6 
credit hours. 



226 



RU 201-202 Intermediate 
Russian 

Prerequisites: RU 101-102 or 
the equivalent. Stresses the read- 
ing comprehension of modern 
prose texts and a review of gram- 
mar necessary for this reading. 
Students are encouraged to read 
in their own areas of interest. 6 
credit hours. 



Science and 

Environmental 

Studies 

Courses that are marked with an 
asterisk (*) are usually scheduled ev- 
ery other academic year. 



*SC 111-112 Physical Science 

The meaning of scienhfic con- 
cepts and terms and their rela- 
tion to other areas of learning 
and to daily living. Development 
and unity of physical science as 
a field of knowledge. Includes 
astronomy, physics, chemistry 
and geology. 6 credit hours. 

*SC 126 Astronomy 

An introduction to present 
concepts concerning the nature 
and evolution of planets, stars, 
galaxies and other components 
of the universe. The experimen- 
tal and observational bases for 
these concepts are examined. 3 
credit hours. 

*SC 135 Earth Science 

A dynamic systems approach 
to phenomena of geology, 
oceanography and meteorology. 
Emphasis on interrelations of 
factors and processes and on im- 
portance of subject matter to hu- 
man affairs. Suitable for non- 
science as well as for science ma- 
jors. 3 credit hours. 



*SC 146 Fundamentals of 
Oceanography 

Description of major aspects of 
geological, chemical, physical 
and biological oceanography. 
Emphasis on human use and dis- 
use of oceans. Suitable for non- 
science as well as science majors. 
3 credit hours. 

*SC 309 Scientific Photographic 
Documentation 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253 
or consent of the instructor. The- 
ory and practice of photographic 
image formation and recording. 
Photography of biological, eco- 
logical and graphic subjects of all 
sizes using black and white, in- 
frared, color negative and color 
positive and polaroid materials. 
Laboratory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*SC 507 Characterization and 
Treatment of Wastes with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: SC 135, BI 361 or 
CH 201-202, CH 211; M 117-118. 
The types of waste materials 
generated by agriculture, indus- 
try, transportation, municipali- 
ties and individuals are dis- 
cussed and the methods of 
detection and identification and 
treatment of each type of waste 
materials are covered. Labora- 
tory Fee. 4 credit hours. 

*SC 513 Environmental 
Pollutants with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 116 and BI 
330, or permission of instructor. 
Physical, chemical and biological 
properties of the major environ- 
mental pollutants. New and 
older methods of sampling, 
identification and measurement 
are presented. Laboratory Fee. 4 
credit hours. 



Shipbuilding and 
Marine Technology 

SB 101 Introduction to 
Shipbuilding 

Prerequisites: M109 and ME 
101 or equivalent. The basic 
terms, concepts, and methods 
used in describing and designing 
large ships. Coefficients of form 
are defined, structural members 
are described, elemental 
strength calculations are made 
for joints, hull bending stresses, 
critical launching loads etc. and 
basic approaches for watertight 
subdivision are explored. 3 
credit hours. 

SB 102 Basic Ship Stability 

Prerequisite: SB 101. Funda- 
mental concepts and methods of 
calculating the key stability pa- 
rameters for a displacement 
ship. Topics include: the geome- 
try and effect of the center of 
floatation, metacentric height, 
and righting arm curves; causes 
of impaired stability from free 
surface, pocketing, surface per- 
meability, etc.; and an introduc- 
tion to the dynamic stability 
characteristics of heeling energy, 
stability-curve criteria, rudder 
and maneuvering hydrodynam- 
ics etc. 3 credit hours. 

SB 201 Elements of Ship 
Propulsion 

Prerequisite: SB 101. Intro- 
duces the theory and calcula- 
tions used in establishing a 
ship's speed-power curve and 
the related propulsion train fea- 
tures. The various propulsive ef- 
ficiencies defined and used in 
solving typical ship resistance 
problems. Standard prime mov- 
ers as well as methods for select- 
ing a specific power plant. A 
short unit on propeller theory 
and selection. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 227 



Shipyard 
Management 



SM 415 Shipyard Management: 
Marketing 

A study of methods to employ 
when defining future markets 
that will determine new ship- 
yard production. Relationship 
between investment, relative 
productivity and share of the 
world shipbuilding market. De- 
termination of market share as 
affected by technical efficiency 
and cost efficiencies. Emphasis 
on problems in the dry and liq- 
uid bulk sectors of the industry. 
3 credit hours. 



SM 410 World Shipbuilding 

Analysis of the world mer- 
chant fleets and the U.S. mer- 
chant fleet. Discussion and anal- 
ysis of comparative maritime 
aids. The following countries are 
reviewed: Japan, United King- 
dom, Norway, Sweden, West 
Germany, France and the United 
States. A review also of the Com- 
munist countries to the extent 
that information is available. 

World shipbuilding competitive 

factors analyzed. 3 credit hours. SociolOEV 

SM 412 Shipyard Management: 
Finance 

A study of determinants in 
forecasting shipyard investment 
demand. Discussion of compara- 
tive efficiency and marine facilit- 
ies. Private sources of financing 
and federal subsidies. Cost and 
benefits from shipbuilding sub- 
sidies. Discussion of marine aids 
available in American shipbuild- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 

SM 414 Shipyard Management: 
Planning and Control 

Covers planning and control 
in a commercial shipyard, re- 
quired by all levels of manage- 
ment to produce quality ships on 
time. Special emphasis placed on 
planning for the use of resources 
by middle-level managers and 
supervisors. Stress is placed on 
effective management of time, 
facilities, materials and man- 
power. 3 credit hours. 



SO 113 Sociology 

The role of culture in society, 
the person and personality; 
groups and group behavior; in- 
stitutions; social interaction and 
social change. 3 credit hours. 

SO 114 Contemporary Social 
Problems 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of instructor. The major 
problems which confront the 
present social order, and the 
methods now in practice or be- 
ing considered for dealing with 
these problems. 3 credit hours. 

SO 115 Women in Society 

An overview of woman's role 
in the social system. Discussion 
includes myths and realittes of 
sex differences. Areas covered 
include analysis of the relation- 
ship of women to the economy, 
the arts, sciences and how these 
affect the behavior of women in 
the contemporary world. 3 credit 
hours. 

SO 214 Deviance 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. (Offered in 
the spring semester only.) Cen- 
tered around deviance as a social 
product. The problematic nature 
of the stigmaHzation process is 
explored in such areas as alco- 
holism, crime, mental illness and 
sexual behavior. 3 credit hours. 



SO 218 The Community 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of instructor. The commu- 
nity and its provisions for health, 
education, recreation, safety and 
welfare. Theoretical concepts of 
community, plus ethnographic 
studies of small-scale human 
communities, introduce stu- 
dents to fundamental concepts 
of community. 3 credit hours. 

SO 220 Physical Anthropology 
and Archaeology 

An introduction to the study 
of human evolution and of pres- 
ent physical variations among 
mankind. Includes geologic 
time, primate evolution and 
early man and his culture. 3 
credit hours. 

SO 221 Cultural Anthropology 

A systematic study of the cul- 
ture of preliterate and modern 
societies and of cultural change. 
Includes analyses of religion, 
economics, language, social and 
political organization and urban- 
ization. 3 credit hours. 

SO 231 Juvenile Delinquency 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111. 
This course is offered as CJ 221 
in university schedules. An anal- 
ysis of delinquent behavior in 
American society; examination 
of the theories and social corre- 
lates of delinquency, and the 
sociolegal processes and appara- 
tus for dealing with juvenile de- 
linquency. 3 credit hours. (Same 
asCJ221.) 

SO 250 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: sophomore 

status. The student develops the 
concepts necessary for selection 
and formulation of research 
problems in social science, re- 
search design and techniques, 
analysis and interpretation of re- 
search data. 3 credit hours. 



228 



SO 310 Primary Group 
Interaction 

Prerequisite: SO 113. Explora- 
tion of communication in group 
process. Building a group and 
analyzing group structure and 
interaction; the ways people 
communicate emotionally and 
intellectually. 3 credit hours. 

SO 311 Criminology 

Prerequisites: P 111, SO 113. 
An introduction to the principles 
and concepts of criminology; 
analysis of the social context of 
criminal behavior, including a 
review of criminological theory, 
the nature and distribution of 
crime, the sociology of criminal 
law and the societal reactions to 
crime and criminals. 3 credit 
hours. (Same as CJ 311.) 

SO 312 Marriage and the Family 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of instructor. The forma- 
tion, functioning and dissolution 
of relationships in contemporary 
American society is examined 
from an applied sociology per- 
spective. 3 credit hours. 

SO 313 Sociology of Sport 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. A study of 
the relationships among sport, 
culture and society. Emphasis is 
on both amateur and profes- 
sional sports and their impact on 
the larger social order. Course 
will examine sport from a com- 
parative and historical perspec- 
tive, but will also focus on prob- 
lems confronting the world of 
sport in contemporary American 
society. 3 credit hours. 

SO 315 Social Change 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of instructor. Sources, pat- 
terns and processes of social 
change with examination of clas- 
sical and modern theories of ma- 
jor trends and developments as 
well as studies of perspectives on 
microlevels of change in modern 
society. 3 credit hours. 



SO 320 Social Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 111, SO 113. 
This course is offered as P 321 in 
university schedules. The inter- 
dependence of social organiza- 
tions and behavior. The inter- 
relationships between role 
systems and personality; atti- 
tude analysis, development and 
modification; group interaction 
analysis; social conformity; so- 
cial class and human behavior. 3 
credit hours. (Same as P 321.) 

SO 321 Social Inequality 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of instructor. Organization 
of social class: status, power and 
process of social mobility in con- 
temporary society. Social stratifi- 
cation, its functions and dys- 
functions, as it relates to the 
distribution of opportunity, 
privilege and power in society. 3 
credit hours. 

SO 331 Population and Ecology 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or per- 
mission of the instructor. Soci- 
etal implications of population 
changes and trends; impact of 
man as a social animal upon nat- 
ural resources, cultural values 
and social structures; cultural 
values and social structures, 
their influence on environmental 
ethics. 3 credit hours. 

SO 333 Sociology of Aging 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. The socio- 
logical phenomenon connected 
with aging in America. Discus- 
sion of the connections between 
personal troubles and social is- 
sues encountered by members of 
this society as they age. An ex- 
amination of age stratification 
and the resultant problems of 
ageism, prejudice and discrimi- 
nation. Systematic review of ma- 
jor theoretical framework and re- 
search studies; emphasis will be 
placed on the application of so- 
ciological theory and research in 
the field of aging. 3 credit hours. 



SO 337 Human Sexuality 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. A scientific 
study of human sexual behav- 
ioral patterns, social class atti- 
tudes and cultural myths. Topics 
include reproductive systems, 
sexual attitudes and behavioral 
patterns, abortion and sexual 
laws and variations in sexual 
functioning. 3 credit hours. 

SO 340 Medical Sociology 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. An analy- 
sis of a major social institution, 
the health care field. Emphasis 
placed on socio-cultural aspects 
of the field; general overview of 
the organization and delivery of 
health care services and the cur- 
rent problems and issues. 3 
credit hours. 

SO 350 Social Survey Research 

Prerequisite: P 301 or M 228. 
Introduction to the logic of social 
science by a survey research 
project. Emphasis on the use of 
computer software in analyzing 
large date sets. Topics include 
theory development, survey de- 
sign, sampling, methods of data 
collection and statistical analysis 
of social science date. This is part 
of the computer literacy compo- 
nent of the University Core Cur- 
riculum. 3 credit hours. 

SO 390 Sociology of 
Organizations 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. Classic so- 
ciological theories of organiza- 
tion with emphasis on the 
concepts of bureaucracy, scien- 
tific management, human rela- 
tions and decision-making the- 
ory. The relevance of these ideas 
to concrete organization con- 
texts, e.g., civil service, business, 
social movements and political 
parties, charitable institutions, 
hospitals. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 229 



SO 400 Minority Group 
Relations 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. An inter- 
disciplinary analysis of minority 
groups with particular attention 
paid to those regional, religious 
and racial factors that influence 
interraction. Designed to pro- 
mote an understanding of sub- 
group culture. 3 credit hours. 

SO 413 Social Theory 

Prerequisite: nine semester 
hours in sociology. An analysis 
of the development of sociology 
in the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries with particular empha- 
sis on the theories of Comte, 
Durkheim, Simmel, Weber, 
Marx, deTocqueville and others. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 418 Public Opinion and 
Social Pressure 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111. 
An intensive analysis of the na- 
ture and development of public 
opinion with particular consider- 
ation of the roles, both actual 
and potential, of communication 
and influence. 3 credit hours. 

SO 440 Undergraduate Seminar 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department chairman. A de- 
tailed examination of selected 
topics in the field of sociology 
and a critical analysis of perti- 
nent theories with emphasis on 
modem social thought. 3 credit 
hours. 

SO 441 Sociology of Death and 
Suicide 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or con- 
sent of the instructor. A confron- 
tation with individual mortality 
and an academic investigation of 
such phenomena as funerals, 
terminal illness and crisis inter- 
venHon, among many others. 3 
credit hours. 



SO 450 Research Seminar 

Prerequisite: P 301 or M 228. 
The student develops and carries 
out an original research project 
in social science, reporting this 
procedure to the class. 3 credit 
hours. 

SO 451-455 Special Topics: 
Sociology, Social Services, 
Anthropology 

Prerequisite: SO 113, SO 221, 
or permission of instructor. Spe- 
cial topics in sociology, anthro- 
pology, or social welfare on a va- 
riety of current problems and 
specialized areas not available in 
the regular curriculum. 3 credit 
hours. 

SO 501-502 Practicum 

Prerequisite: consent of the 
department chairman. Field ex- 
perience in sociology or anthro- 
pology. Seminars in conjunction 
with this experience belfore off- 
campus field work is under- 
taken. Contact during the field 
work experience and guidance 
by the mentor provide an oppor- 
tunity for understanding group 
and individual dynamics and 
their repercussions. Follow-up 
seminars and a paper are re- 
quired. 1-6 credit hours. 

SO 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of in- 
structor and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the stu- 
dent, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore an 
area of personal interest. This 
course must be initiated by the 
student. 1-3 credit hours per se- 
mester with a maximum of 12. 



Social Services 

SW 220 Introduction to Social 
Services 

Introduction to Social Services 
explores two basic questions 
from a historical perspective: 
Why are people poor, and, how 
societies have responded to the 
conditions of poverty. Focus on 
how the different economic, po- 
litical, psychological, and socio- 
logical arrangements of society, 
and its social institutions, create 
conditions which stimulate and 
necessitate differing social wel- 
fare responses. 3 credit hours. 

SW 340 Group Dynamics 

Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. Designed for students 
who seek to develop their leader- 
ship skills in working with 
groups of various types. A cogni- 
tive and behavioral mastery of a 
range of complex variables for 
role effectiveness, including a 
working knowledge of personal, 
group and organizational dy- 
namics, professional skills of fa- 
cilitation, and values of one's 
professional identity. 3 credit 
hours. 

SW 401-402 Field Instruction 
I and II 

Supervised experience rele- 
vant to specific aspects of social 
services in human service agen- 
cies, institutions and organiza- 
tions at the local, state and fed- 
eral levels. Seminars to assist 
students with the integration of 
theoretical knowledge and field 
techniques through lectures and 
class presentations. Students are 
required to spend eight hours a 
week in the field. 3 credit hours 
each. 



230 

SW 415-416 Methods of 
Intervention I and II 

Basic social work theory in 
conjunction with pracHce skills 
to help students begin to de- 
velop professional techniques 
for intervention at both the 
macro and micro levels of prac- 
tice. 3 credit hours each. 

SW 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Consent of the 
particular faculty member De- 
signed to permit students to pur- 
sue specific areas of interest 
which may not be available in 
the curriculum. 1-3 credit hours. 



Spanish 



SP 101-102 Elementary Spanish 

Stresses pronunciation, aural 
and reading comprehension, ba- 
sic conversation and the funda- 
mental principles of grammar. 6 
credit hours. 

SP 201-202 Intermediate 
Spanish 

Prerequisites: SP 101-102 or 
equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose 
texts and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to read in 
their own areas of interest. 6 
credit hours. 



Theatre Arts 

T 131 Introduction to the 
Theatre 

Play analysis from a literary 
standpoint and as it relates to 
special problems of the actor, di- 
rector, designers and backstage 
personnel. Practical work in all 
phases within the classroom. 
Fall semester. 3 credit hours. 



T 132 Theatrical Style 

Study of dramatic genres and 
theatrical conventions through 
script and critical reading, as 
well as practical work in class. 
Spring semester. 3 credit hours. 

T 241 Early World Drama and 
Theatre 

Dramatic literature in theatri- 
cal contexts from classical Greece 
through Restoration England. 3 
credit hours. 

T 242 Modern World Drama and 
Theatre 

Dramatic literature in theatri- 
cal contexts from Realism 
through the nineteenth century 
to the present. Includes ethnic 
drama. 3 credit hours. 

T 341 Acting 

Development of acting skills 
for the stage through games, im- 
provisation and scene study. 3 
credit hours. 

T 342 Play Directing 

Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. Fundamentals of direct- 
ing, staging techniques, working 
with actors and direction of a 
one-act play for workshop pre- 
sentation. 3 credit hours. 

T 491-492 Production 
Practicum I-II 

Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. Practicum in various ar- 
eas of theatre: acting, directing, 
administration, technical theatre 
and design. Will be directly re- 
lated to departmental produc- 
tions. Each 3 credit hours. 

T 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student 
under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of in- 
terest. This course must be initi- 
ated by the student. 3 credit 
hours. 



Tourism and Travel 
Administration 

TT 165 Introduction to Tourism 
and Hospitality 

An introduction to the main 
segments of the tourism and 
hospitality industry. Compo- 
nents of the industry include all 
forms of transportation — air, 
sea, rail and vehicular traffic; ho- 
tel/restaurant industry; national, 
state and local tourism boards 
and convention offices; National 
Park Services; tour operations; 
travel agency and corporate 
travel. 3 credit hours. 

TT 166 Touristic Geography 

Prerequisite: TT 165. An ex- 
amination of the touristic areas 
of the most important travel des- 
tinations. Travel destinations; 
current developments of travel 
world wide; attracting individu- 
als, pleasure groups and busi- 
ness conventions. 3 credit hours. 

TT 267 Shipping and Cruises 

Prerequisites: TT 165, TT 166. 
An analysis of the modern ship- 
ping and cruising industries; the 
passenger liner as a total vaca- 
tion entity and its interrelation- 
ship with airlines, tour operators 
and travel agencies. 3 credit 
hours. 



TT 270 Computerized Airiine 
Reservations and Ticketing 

Prerequisites: TT 165, TT 166. 
Topics include the historical 
background of air travel, devel- 
opments, trends and the effect of 
deregulation on airlines, travel 
agencies and the consumer. A 
major part of the course will be 
devoted to the study of comput- 
erized airline reservations and 
ticketing procedures. 3 credit 
hours. 

TT 280 Group Travel 

Prerequisites: TT 165, TT 166. 
An in-depth examination of the 
tour industry, including a de- 
tailed study of package tours, es- 
corted tours, costing, marketing 
and planning. Included in the 
study is the creation of an indi- 
vidual, fully escorted tour from 
start to finish. 3 credit hours. 

TT 375 Travel Agency 
Management 

Prerequisites: TT 165, TT 166, 
TT 267, TT 270. A study of the 
travel business, defining the 
roles of the retail travel agent 
and the wholesale tour operator, 
and an examination of their rela- 
tionships within the industry 
and with the traveling public. 3 
credit hours. 



TT 430 Professional Meeting 
Planner Management 

Prerequisite: senior status or 
consent of instructor. As corpo- 
rate meetings/conventions con- 
tinue to increase on the world- 
wide tourism market, meeting 
professionals have become im- 
portant members of the industry 
serving as liaisons between cor- 
porate executives and the tour- 
ism industry. Course focuses on 
their responsibilities which in- 
clude: site selection, meeting or- 
ganization, transportation, lei- 
sure activities and coordination 
with local tourism offices and 
convention bureaus. 3 credit 
hours. 

TT 440 Tourism Planning and 
Development 

Prerequisite: senior status or 
consent of instructor. A detailed 
analysis of the immense propor- 
tions of world tourism, spanning 
processes of long-range plan- 
ning that insure tourism's 
proper development within the 
country's national framework 
and tourism policy. Includes site 
development, infrastructure, ac- 
commodatiorts and negotiations 
with transportation modes (air- 
line, rail and shipping). Also the 
role of the United Nations 
through its World Tourism Or- 
ganization in the planning and 
development of tourism sites in 
Third World Nations. 3 credit 
hours. 



Courses 231 

TT 450 U.S. Tourism 
Development and Investment 

Prerequisite: senior status or 
consent of instructor. In an era 
when more leisure time and 
more discretionary income is 
available, coupled with ever- 
changing air fares and a fluctuat- 
ing currency, the results have 
been a great challenge to tourism 
in the United States. The global 
thrust has come from almost 
every area of the world. This 
course will examine the facets of 
the industry that must redirect 
their objectives and service 
efforts to the needs of the foreign 
visitor. 3 credit hours. 

TT 494-498 Special Studies in 
Tourism and Travel 
Administration 

Special studies on a variety of 
current problems and special- 
ized areas in the field not avail- 
able in the regular curriculum. 3 
credit hours per course. 

TT 512 Seminar in Tourism 
and Travel 

Prerequisite: senior status or 
consent of the instructor. Cur- 
rent topics and developments 
within the travel and tourism in- 
dustry. 3 credit hours. 

TT 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
department chairman. Indepen- 
dent research projects or other 
approved phases of indepen- 
dent study. 3 credit hours. 



233 



BOARD, ADMINISTRATION, 
AND FACULTY 



Board of Governors'^ 



Charles Ballaro, day student representative 

Henry E. Bartels, former vice president, Insilco Corporation 

Ruth Baylis, graduate school representative 

James Q. Bensen, former resident manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

William I. Bergman, president, Richardson- Vicks, U.S.A. 

Roland M. Bixler, president, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Norman I. Botwinik, chairman; Botwinik Associates 

Jessie M. Godley Bradley, former assistant superintendent. New Haven Public Schools 

William C. Bruce, vice president, Pirelli/Armstrong Tire Corporation 

Richard F. Connell, assistant vice president. Employee Benefits Division, Aetna Life and 

Casualty 
Brent Coscia, evening student representative 
William Deuel, day student representative 
Herbert Dike, day student representative 

Robert B. Dodds, former president. Safety Electrical Equipment Corporation 
Edward J. Drew, retired manager, Quinnipiack Club 

Orest T. Dubno, executive director, Connecticut Housing Finance Authority 
Robert D, Dugan, full-time faculty representative 
Joseph F. Duplinsky, honorary chairman of the board. Blue Cross & Blue Shield of 

Connecticut 
John E. Echlin, Jr., former account executive, Paine Webber 
Raymond A. Fletcher, general manager, information systems and technology. Southern New 

England Telecommunications Corp. 
John A. Frey, president, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 
Julie Gelgauda, alumni representative 

Murray Gerber, president. Prototype & Plastic Mold Company, Inc. 
Robert M. Gordon, former president, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 
Phillip Kaplan, president. University of New Haven 
George E. Laursen, former vice president-manufacturing. Health and Beauty Division, 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc. 
Harold R. Logan, former vice chairman and director, W. R. Grace & Company 
Jean C. McAndrews, editor. Business Digest of Greater New Haven 
Alexander W. Nicholson, Jr., chief executive officer. Statewide Insurance Group 
Flemming L. Norcott, Jr., appellate court justice 

*CorriXl for Spriii^^ 199(1 



234 

Herbert H. Pearce, vice chairman; chairman of the board and chief executive officer, H. Pearce 

Company 
Joyce O. Resnicoff, secretary/treasurer and manager of Old Mystic Village, and secretary/ 

treasurer. Mall Inc. 
Charles Richardson, graduate student representative 

Mrs. William F. Robinson, Sr., former Title IV consultant. State Department of Education 
Francis A. Schneiders, president, Enthone-OMI, Inc. 
Fenmore R. Seton, retired president, Seton Name Plate Corporation 
Leon J. Talalay, retired, B.F. Goodrich Company 
R. C. Taylor, III, president, Tay-Mac Corporation 
Lloyd R. Thompson, adjunct faculty representative 
George R. Tieman, secretary; attorney at law 
Cheever Tyler, attorney at law, Wiggin & Dana 
Elisabeth S. van Dyke, full-time faculty representative 
Robert F. Wilson, former chairman of the board, Wallace International Silversmiths, Inc. 

Standing Committees of the Board 

Executive: Norman I. Botwinik, chairman; Herbert H. Pearce, vice chairman; James Q. 
Bensen, Robert B. Dodds, Joseph F. Duplinsky, John E. Echlin, Jr., Robert M. Gordon, 
Phillip Kaplan (non-voting), Alexander W. Nicholson, Jr., Leon J. Talalay, George R. 
Tiernan, Cheever Tyler, Robert F. Wilson 

Buildings and Grounds: Norman I. Botwinik, chairman; Leon J. Talalay, vice chairman; 
Edward J. Drew 

Development: Cheever Tyler, chairman; James Q. Bensen, Norman I. Botwinik (ex-officio), 
Robert B. Dodds, Phillip Kaplan (non-voting), Nikki Lindberg (staff), Alexander W. 
Nicholson, Jr., Herbert H. Pearce, Leon J. Talalay 

Nominating: Herbert H. Pearce, chairman; John A. Frey, Phillip Kaplan (non-voting), Mrs. 
William F. Robinson, Sr. 

Finance: Joseph F. Duplinsky, chairman; Robert P. Adler, James Q. Bensen, Robert B. Dodds, 
John E. Echlin, Jr., Frederick G. Fischer (staff), Robert M. Gordon, Phillip Kaplan (non- 
voting), Alexander W. Nicholson, Jr., Robert F. Wilson 

Personnel: Leon J. Talalay, chairman; Phillip Kaplan (non- voting) 

Administration 

Office of the President 

Phillip Kaplan, B.A.,M.A., Ph.D., president 

Lorraine A. Guidone, assistant to the president and to the chairman of the board 

Lucy Wendland, executive secretary 

Office of the Provost 

Alexis N. Sommers, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., provost 

James W. Uebelacker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., vice provost 

Caroline A. Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., associate provost for governmental affairs 

(Vacant), assistant provost for students' academic development 

Johnnie M. Fryer, B.A., M.S., director. Office of Minority Affairs 

Genevieve Lysak, executive secretary 



Board, Administration and Faculty 235 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Joseph B. Chepaitis, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

Henry E. Voegeli, B.A., Ph.D., chairman, biology/environmental science 

Michael J. Saliby, B.S., Ph.D., chairman, chemistry 

Steven Raucher, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., chairman, communication 

Joseph Parker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., chairman, economics 

Donald M. Smith, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., chairman, English 

Edmund Todd III, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., chairman, history 

Michael Kaloyanides, B.A., Ph.D., chairman, visual and performing arts and philosophy 

Donald Fridshal, B.E.E., M.S., Ph.D., chairman, mathematics 

Kee W. Chun, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., chairman, physics 

James P. Dull, B.A., M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., chairman, political science 

Thomas L. Mentzer, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., chairman, psychology 

Walter Jewell, A.B., Ph.D., chairman, sociology and social welfare 

Sharon Reynolds, executive secretary 

School of Business 

Marilou McLaughlin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

Thomas Katsaros, B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., associate dean; director. Bureau of Business 

Research 
Rolf K. Tedefalk, B.S., Ph.D., director, doctoral program 
Robert G. McDonald, B.S., M.B.A., chairman, accounting 
Steven Raucher, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., chairman, communication/marketing 
Joseph Parker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., chairman, economics/finance 

Abbas Nadim, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., chairman, management and quantitative analysis 
Charles N. Coleman, B.A., M.P.A., chairman, public management 
Rain Burroughs, assistant to the dean 
Pauline Hill, executive secretary 

Executive M.B.A. Program 

Ruth Gonchar Brennan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., director. Executive MBA Program 

School of Engineering 

M. Jerry Kenig, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

John Sarris, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., associate dean; chairman, mechanical engineering 

B. Badri Saleeby, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., associate dean for Southeastern Connecticut 

Richard A. Strauss, B.A., M.P.A., assistant dean for administration 

Michael J. Saliby, B.S., Ph.D., chairman, chemistry and chemical engineering 

David J. Wall, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., chairman, civil and environmental engineering 

Daniel C. O'Keefe, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D., chairman, electrical and computer engineering 

Ira H. Kleinfeld, B.S., M.S., Sc.D., chairman, industrial engineering and computer science 

Alice Fischer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., undergraduate coordinator, computer science 

Roger G. Frey, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., graduate coordinator, computer science 

M. Hamdy Bechir, graduate coordinator, environmental engineering 

Lucille P. Lamberti, executive secretary 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 

Marilou McLaughlin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., acting dean 

Mark M. Warner, B.S., M.A., chairman, hotel and restaurant management 

Elisabeth van Dyke, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., chairman, tourism and travel administration 

Linda Carlone, administrative assistant to the dean 

Nancy DeMartino, executive secretary 



236 

School of Professional Studies and Continuing Education 

Ralf E. Carriuolo, B.A., M.M., Ph.D., dean 

Dany J. Washington, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., associate dean 

Patricia Bolles, M.S., assistant to the dean 

Silvia I. Hyde, executive secretary 

Continuing Education 

Dany J. Washington, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., director 

Professional Studies 

Brad Garber, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., chairman; director, occupational safety and health 

Frederick Mercilliott, B.S., M.P.A., D.A., Ph.D., director. Center for Public Safety; director, 

graduate fire science programs 
David Hunter, B.S., M.P.A., director, aviation 

Robert G. Sawyer, B.S., M.S., director, undergraduate fire science programs 
Richard L. Penn, Jr., B.S., B.A., M.A., director of flight operations 

Division of Corporate and Professional Development 
Martha Fox, A.S., B.S., director 
Betsy Hogan, administrative assistant 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 

John F. O'Brien, B.S., M.B.A., senior director 

Audrey P. Clapham, B.A., M.A.T., M.A., Ph.D., associate director 

Jane P. Campbell, administrative assistant 

Graduate School 

William S. Gere, Jr., B.M.E., M.S.I.E., Ph.D., dean 

Jane Joseph, executive secretary 

Graduate Admissions 

Joseph F. Spellman, B.S., M.A., director of graduate admissions and operations 
Letitia Bingham, B.A., M.A., assistant director 
*Joseph C. Heap, B.S., M.Ed., coordinator. Southeastern Connecticut 

Equal Opportunity 

Caroline A. Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., associate provost 

Institute of Computer Studies 
Richard B. Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., director 
Henry Farkas, B.S., microlab director 

Library 

Gretchen Hammerstein, B.A., M.L.S., university librarian 

Hanko Dobi, B.A., M.L.S., associate director, coordinator of branches 

Alison Lipski, B.A., M.A., Dip. L.S., reference librarian 

Christine Walnycky, B.S., M.L.S., reference librarian 

Paula Pini, B.S.,M.L.S., reference librarian 

Mary Ferraguto, B.A., M.L.S., reference librarian 

Ann Andrus, executive secretary 



Board, Administration and Faculty 237 

Students' Academic Development 
(Vacant), assistant provost 

Loretta K. Smith, B.A., M.A., director of the center for learning resources 
*Mildred Bohannah, B.A., M.A., retention counselor 
Sheila Chepya, B.A., M.S., retention counselor 
Nancy Ronne, B.A., M.A., retention counselor 
Donald C. Smith, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., retention counselor 
Christine Repoley, B.A., M.A., administrative assistant 

Office of the Vice President for Finance 

Frederick G, Fischer, B.S., CPA, vice president for finance, treasurer, secretary to the 

university 
Elsie Calandro, executive secretary 

Athletics 

William M. Leete, M.Ed., director 

Deborah Chin, M.S.P.E., associate director; head coach, volleyball 

Frank Vieira, M.S., head coach, baseball, director of intramurals 

John Anquillare, B.S., assistant coach, baseball 

Robert Deobil, B.S., trainer; administrative assistant 

Jack Jones, B.A., sports information director 

Mark Whipple, B.A., head coach, football 

Eric Burgess, B.S., assistant coach, football 

Paul Gorham, B.A., assistant coach, football 

Stuart Grove, 6th Year Certificate, head coach, men's basketball 

Joseph Maher, B.A., head coach, soccer 

James Hanneken, B.A., head coach, cross country, track 

Peter Zoppi, B.S., head coach, softball 

David Haefele, B.A., head coach, lacrosse 

Leo Paquette, equipment manager 

Business Office 

Marjorie C. Montague, B.S., M.B.A., controller, assistant secretary to the university 

Noreen Biondi, B.S., assistant controller 

Frances A. MacMillan, bursar 

Scott Allen, B.S., accounting supervisor 

Diane Bencivengo, accounts clerk 

Mary Lou Kromer, A.S., accounts clerk 

Rosemary Rzeszutek, B.S., payroll supervisor 

Ann Thompson, accounts clerk 
*Helene Fillmore, accounts clerk 

Trace Landino, B.S., accounting coordinator 

Alonna Massella, accounts clerk 

Denise Pineau, accounts clerk 

Polly MacDiarmid, receptionist-console operator 

Stephanie Magliola, receptionist-console operator 
*Denotes part-time employee 



238 

Public Relations 
Antoinette Blood, B.A., director 
Susan DiGangi, B.A., assistant director 
Susan Noe, B.A., publications coordinator 
Laura Heffernan, B.F.A., graphics coordinator 
Sandra Quinn, executive secretary 

Purchasing, Receiving and Duplicating 

Frederick G. Fischer, B.S., vice president for finance 
Lynne Ryerse, purchasing manager 
Maureen Chase, central duplicating service 
*Phyllis Raffone, administrative clerk I 

Computer Center 

Albert C. Leiper, B.A., M.S., director 

Johann Stanton, senior administrative assistant 

Cynthia Kranyik, B.A., M.S., director of academic services 

Susan Hung, B.A., M.S., information center supervisor 

James Trella, B.S., M.S., computer systems specialist 

Raymond Pulaski, B.S., M.S., manager of computer operations and on-premise C.E. 

Salvatore Votto, Jr., A.S., B.S., director of administrative services 

John Mitchell, A.S., B.S., M.S., data communications technical analyst 

Gerald Fetrecca, B.S., programmer 

Daniel Hally, B.A., senior programmer analyst 

Arnold Gibb, computer operator 

Donato Laudano, B.S., academic user services speciahst 

Security 

Donald R. Scott, A.S., B.S., chief 

Richard D. Baker, A.S., inspector 

John H. Amato, B.S., sergeant 

Eldridge L. Hatcher, patrol sergeant 

Arcadio Rodriguez, patrol sergeant 

Arthur P. Sheehan, B.S., detective/lieutenant 

James V. Dillman, patrolman 

John S. Gondor, B.A., patrolman 

Oscar J. Stanley, patrolman 

Ronald D. Whittaby, patrolman 

Timothy P. Wilson, patrolman 

Rosemarie Giannotti, executive secretary 

Dorothy L, Kyles, dispatcher/office attendant 
*Theodore Kastancuk, dispatcher/office attendant 
*Samuel Smith, B.S., dispatcher/office attendant 

Office of the Vice President for Administration 

Joseph F, Carilli, B.S., B.C.E., J.D., vice president 
Susan E. Criscuolo, executive secretary 



Board, Administration and Faculty 239 

Buildings and Grounds 

James B. Alekshun, B.S., M.B.A., director 

Michel Jean-Pierre, supervisor of custodial services 

Susan E. Maiorino, B.S., work order administrator 

Harry C. Martin, evening supervisor 

Robert D. Sires, maintenance supervisor 

Personnel 

David C. Hennessey, B.A., M.B.A., director 

P. Penny Pecka, B.S., assistant director 

Student Life 

James E. Martin, Jr., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., dean 

Ann Massini, executive secretary 

Pamela Francis, B.S., M.A., director, career development and cooperative education 

Deborah Everhart, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., director, counseling center 

John Auerbach, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., assistant director, counseling center 

David J. Kmetz, B.S., M.A., director, disabled student services 

Phyllis Landry, R.N., A.S., B.S., C.O.H.N., assistant director, health services 

Mary Idzior, B.A., Ed.M., J.D., director, international services 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., director, residential life 

Diane Rasch, B.S., M.S., assistant director, residential life 

Kathryn McQueeney, B.S., M.Ed., director, student activities and development 

Office of Admission Services 

Robert Caruso, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., dean of admission services 
Yolanda Costanzo, executive secretary 

Undergraduate Admissions 

Laurie G. Saunders, B.S., M.A., director of undergraduate admissions 

Lesa Loritts, B.A., associate director 

Scott Farber, B.A., M.A., assistant director 

Midge Burnette, B.S., M.S., coordinator of international admissions 

Charles F. Nelson, A.B., M.A., coordinator of marketing and research 

Heather Fiedler, B.A., counselor 

Marc Feinstein, B.S., regional admissions representative 

Paula Myer, B.A., counselor 

Ivo Philbert, B.S., counselor 

Financial Aid 

Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., director 
Karen Flynn, B.A., assistant director 
Susan Gerber, B.S., counselor 

Veterans' Affairs 

Karen Flynn, B.A., veterans' coordinator 

Undergraduate Records 

Joseph Macionus, B.S., M.P.A., university registrar 
Nancy A. Carroll, B.S., M.S., associate registrar 

Graduate Records 

Virginia Klump, registrar for graduate records 



240 

Office of Development and Alumni Relations 

Nikki de L. Lindberg, director 

Jane Cooper, B.S., associate director of corporate and foundation relations 

Patricia J. Rooney, R.S.M., B.S., M.A., director of alumni relations 

Beverly I. Collings, B.A., assistant director of alumni relations 

Beth A. Gazley, B.A., development officer 

Celia A. Lenkiewicz, executive secretary 

Standing Committees of the University 

Academic Standing and Admissions: Warren Smith, M.B.A., chairman 

Athletic Advisory Board: James Downey, Ph.D., chairman 

Pre-medical, Pre-veterinary Medical and Pre-dental Advisory Committee: Charles L. Vigue, 

Ph.D., chairman 
Deans' Council: Alexis N. Sommers, Ph.D., chairman 
Financial Aid: Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., chairman 

Institute of Computer Studies Steering Committee: Richard B. Jones, Ph.D., chairman 
Undergraduate Women: Robert Caruso, Ph.D., chairman 

Faculty 1990* 

Adams, William R., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.E.E., B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 
Aliane, Bouzid, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Ecole Polytechnique d' Alger; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York 
Ashar, Vijay, Associate Professor, Management 

B.A., Bombay University; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University-Raleigh 
Baeder, Robert W., Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Barratt, Carl, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Bristol, England; Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England 
Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professor, Civ'il Engineering 

B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 
Bell, Srilekha, Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Bentivegna, Beverly A., Assistant Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 
Berman, Peter L, Professor, Accounting/Finance 

B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Boardman, Susan, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.S., St. Lawrence University; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Bockley, William R., Associate Professor, Management 

V.E., Northeastern University; L.L.B., LaSalle University, M.B.A., Babson College; Ph.D., 
Boston College 
Bodon, Jean-Richard, Associate Professor, Communication 

B.A., Birmingham Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Florida State 
University 
Broderick, Gregory P., Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Northeastern University; Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin 
Brody, Robert P., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; D.B.A., Harvard University 

* Effective as of September 1990 



Board, Administration and Faculty 241 

Carriuolo, Nancyanne, Professor, English 

B.A., M.S., State University of New York/College at Brockport; Ph.D., State University of 
New York at Buffalo 
Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College; Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Carson, George R., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College of New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 
Celotto, Albert, Instructor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.M., Western Connecticut State College; M.M., Indiana State University 
Chandra, Satish, Professor, Business Law 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; L.L.B., Lucknow Law School, 
India; L.L.M., J.S.D., Yale University 
Chepaitis, Joseph B., Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Cho, Bih-Lin, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.J., M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia 
Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.M., Princeton University; A.B., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Coleman, Charles N., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.P.A., West Virginia University 
Collura, Michael A., Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 
DeMayo, William S., Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 
Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
Dichele, Ernest M., Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; J.D., Boston College Law School; L.L.M., Boston University 
School of Law 
Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Downe, Edward, Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research 
Downey, James P., Professor, Hotel/Restaurant Management 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 
Dugan, Robert D., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Dull, James W., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Columbia University 
Eikaas, Faith, Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Ellis, Lynn W., Professor, Management 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Stevens Institute; D.P.S., Pace University 
Faigel, Oleg, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow Polytechnic Institute 
Faria-Smith, Nancy, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.B.A., University of Hartford 
Ferringer, Natalie S., Associate Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Fillebrown, Eleanor E., Associate Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., Simmons College; M.B.A., M.S., Drexel University 



242 

Fischer, Alice, Associate Professsor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Fish, Andrew J., Jr., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Iowa, St. Mary's University; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Flaumenhaft, Frank F., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 
French, Bruce A., Professor, English 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; M.A., Middlebury College; 
M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., New York University 
Frey, Roger G., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Yale Law School 
Fridshal, Donald, Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.E., M.S., New York University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Gaensslen, Robert F., Professor, Forensic Science 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Garber, Brad T., Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., University of Cahfornia 
George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D.Eng., Yale University 
Gere, William S., Jr., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., M.S. I.E., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Glen, Robert A., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cahfornia at Berkeley 
Golbazi, Ali M., Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., Detroit Institute of Techology; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Gordon, Judith Bograd, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Greene, Jeffrey, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Goddard College; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Houston 
Griscom, Priscilla, Senior Lecturer, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., University of Rhode Island; M.S., University of New Haven 
Harricharan, Wilfred R., Professor, Management 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Hosay, Norman, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., Wayne State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Hunter, David P., Assistant Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Wagner College, M.P.A., University of New Haven 
Hyman, Arnold, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati 
Jayaswal, Shakuntala, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Ripon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Jewell, Walter, Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Jones, Richard B., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 
Kaloyanides, Michael G., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 



Board, Administration and Faculty 243 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University 
Karimi, Bijan, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Aryamehr University of Technology (Tehran, Iran); M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State 
University 
Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, International Business and Economics 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Kenig, M. Jerry, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Drexel University; M. A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Northeastern University; M.S.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University 
Kleinfeld, Ira H., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Columbia University 
Kublin, Michael, Assistant Professor, Marketing and International Business 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Indiana University; M.B.A., Pace University; Ph.D., New 
York University 
Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S., University of New Haven; M.S.C.E., University of 
Connecticut 
Maffeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York 
University 
Mann, Richard A., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin; M.S.M.E., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin 
Marks, Joel, Associate Professor, Philosophy 

B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., New York University 
Maxwell, David A., Professor, Criminal Justice 

M.A., John Jay College; B.B.A., J.D., University of Miami 
McDonald, Robert G., Associate Professor, Accounting/Finance 

B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., New York University; A.P.C., New York University 
McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
McNeill, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Geneva 
Mensz, Pawel, Associate Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., Warsaw Politechnic; Ph.D., Systems Research Institute of the Polish Academy of 

Sciences 
Mentzer, Thomas L., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 
Mercilliott, Frederick, Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., M.P.A., John Jay College; M.S., University of New Haven; D.A., Western Colorado 
University; Ph.D., City University of New York 
Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 



244 

Montazer, Ali M., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 
Moon, Paul R., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Clarkson University; M.Sc, Ph.D., University of Manitoba 
Morris, David M., Jr., Assistant Professor, Marketing 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Morris, Michael A., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 
Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Nadim, Abbas, Associate Professor, Management 

B.A., Abadan Institute of Technology; M.B.A., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 
Neal, Judith A., Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
O'Brien, Roger, Visiting Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Fordham University; M.W.P., Ph.D., Nev^^ York University 
O'Keefe, Daniel C, Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie Mellon University; Ph.D., Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute 
Okrent, Howard, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.Sc, University of California; S.M., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Orabi, Ismail, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Helwan University, Egypt; M.S., State University of New York; Ph.D., Clarkson 
University 
Pan, William, Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University; M.B.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., Columbia 
University 
Parker, Joseph A,, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State University of New York at 
Buffalo 
Parthasarathi, M. N., Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Benares Hindu University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Penn, Richard L., Jr., Assistant Professor, Professional Studies 

B.A., U.S. Air Force Academy; B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Central Michigan 
University 
Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Porter, Oliver, Assistant Professor, Shipbuilding and Marine Technology 

B.S., Central Michigan University; M.A., University of North Colorado; M.S., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Rainish, Robert, Professor, Finance 

B.A., City College of New York; M.B. A., Bernard M. Baruch College; Ph.D., City University 
of New York 
Raucher, Steven A., Professor, Communication 

B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., Wayne State University 



Board, Administration and Faculty 245 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Rolleri, Michael, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of Connecticut 
Rosenthal, Erik, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, CUNY; M.S., SUNY Center; M. A., Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley 
Ross, Stephen M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Sachdeva, Baldev K., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Delhi University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Sack, Allen L., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Saleeby, B. Badri, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
Saliby, Michael J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton 
Sanders, Matthew, Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., Indiana State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University 
Sandman, Joshua H., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Sarris, John, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 
Sawyer, Robert G., Assistant Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 
Shapiro, Steven, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Sharma, Ramesh, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Banara Hindo University; Ph.D., University of Windsor 
Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Simerson, Gordon, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., University of Delaware; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Sloane, David E. E., Professor, English 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 
Smith, Donald C, Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State University; M.A., Emerson College; Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts (Amherst) 
Smith, Donald M., Associate Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York University 
Smith, Warren J., Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 
Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue University 
Stanley, Richard M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



246 

Surti, Kantilal K., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delav^are; Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut 
Tedefalk, Edyth, Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Dakota 
Tedefalk, Rolf, Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
Teluk, John J., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of Nev^ Haven; M.A., Free 
University of Munich 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Todd, Edmund N., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Tokuz, R. Yucel, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Middle East Technical University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 
Uebelacker, James W., Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
van Dyke, Elisabeth S.L., Associate Professor, Tourism and Travel Admiiustration 

B.A., University of California; M.A., M.S., University of California; Ph.D., Columbia 

University 
Vieira, Frank, Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Vigue, Charles L., Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Vitalo, Paul E., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., St. Francis College; M.S., Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology 
Voegeli, Henry E., Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 
Wakin, Shirley, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 
Wall, David J., Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., M.S., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Walters, Gary, Instructor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.S., University of New Haven 
Warner, Mark, Assistant Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.A., Monmouth College; B.S., Cornell University; M.A., SUNY, Plattsburg 
Washington, Dany J., Associate Professor, Professional Studies and Continuing Education 

B.S., Bethune-Cookman College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Southeastern 
University 
Wentworth, Ronald N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University; M.S. I.E., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 
Werblow, Jack, Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
University of Cincinnati 
Wheeler, George L., Jacob Finley Buckman Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

A.B., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Whitley, W. Thurmon, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University 



Board, Administration and Faculty 247 

Wnek, Robert E., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School; L.L.M., Boston University School 
of Law 
Woodruff, Martha, Assistant Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., M.A., Murray State University; M.S., University of New Haven 
York, Michael W., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Zajac, Roman, Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



248 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Bechir, M, Hamdy, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 

Vermont, Oklahoma 
Bentivegna, Beverly A., Registered Dietician, American Dietetic Association 
Bockley, William R., Certified Purchasing Manager 
Carson, George R,, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New 

Jersey; Landscape Architect, Connecticut; Land Surveyor, Connecticut, Massachusetts; 

Professional Planner, New Jersey 
Collura, Michael, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania 
DeMayo, William, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Dichele, Ernest M., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut, Massachusetts; Attorney at 

Law, Connecticut, Massachusetts 
Dugan, Robert D., Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut; Diplomate in Industrial 

Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology 
Everhart, Deborah, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Faigel, Oleg, Professional Engineer, Connecticut 
Faria-Smith, Nancy, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Fillebrown, Eleanor, Certified Public Accountant, New Jersey 
Garber, Brad T., Certified in General Toxicology, Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of 

Industrial Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 
Goodrow, Lloyd, Attorney at Law, Connecticut (P.I.R.) 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Hunter, David P., Airline Transportation Rated Pilot, Certified Flight Instructor, Certified 

Ground Instructor 
Hyman, Arnold, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Kenig, M. Jerry, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania, Michigan 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachussetts 
Lanius, Ross M,, Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New Jersey 
Mann, Richard A., Professional Engineer, Wisconsin 
Matthews, Sharon, Licensed Architect, Connecticut (PT.R.) 
Maxwell, David, Certified Protection Professional 
McDonald, Robert, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 

Mercilliott, Frederick, Certified Protection Professional; Private Investigator, Connecticut 
Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; Certified Psychologist, Province 

of Alberta, Canada 
Penn, Richard, Jr., Commercial Pilot with Instrument Rating 
Reimer, Richard, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Rolleri, Michael, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Surti, Kantilal K., Chartered Engineer, U.K. 

Tedefalk, Rolf K., Chartered Financial Analyst, Certified Financial Planner 
Tokuz, R. Yucel, Professional Engineer, Ohio 
van Dyke, Elisabeth, Certified Travel Counselor 
Wall, David J., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Pennsylvania 
Wnek, Robert E., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; Member of Bar, Connecticut, 

Pennsylvania 
York, Michael W., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 



Faculty Organization 

Faculty Senate (1989-90) 

Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Secretary to the Faculty 

Chairmen of Senate Committees 

Academic Standards 

Audiovisual 

Budget and Development 

Core Curriculum 

Curriculum 

Environmental 

Faculty Welfare 

General Grievance 

Graduate 

Instruction 

Library 

Sabbatical Leave 

Student/Faculty Relations 

Tenure and Promotion 



Board, Administration and Faculty 249 



Joel Marks 
Elisabeth van Dyke 
Donald M. Smith 
Evelyn Russo 

W. Thurmon Whitley 
Jean Bodon 
Warren Smith 
Robert Sawyer 
Charles Vigue 
Eleanor Fillebrown 
Robert Rainish 
Michael Morris 
Brad Garber 
Donald M. Smith 
Gregory Broderick 
Michael Saliby 
Bruce French 
Steven Raucher 



Practitioners-in-Residence 

Balba, Hamdy, Fire Science 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 
Bassett, Richard, Management 

M.S., University of New Haven 

President, Data Bank Management Systems 
Bohannah, Mildred, Students' Academic Development 

M.A., University of Connecticut 
Coviello, Salvatore, Accounting 

M.S., University of Hartford 

Associate Chief, Appeals, LR.S. Regional Counsel 
Donkin, Arthur, Finance 

M.B.A., Rutgers University 
Goodrow, Lloyd, Public Management 

J.D., University of Connecticut 

American Bar Association, Connecticut Bar Association 
Hecht, Geoffrey, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

J.D., University of Miami 
Johnson, William, Fire Science 

M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 
Krause, Leonard A., Occupational Safety and Health 

D. Sci., University of Cincinnati 
Lee, Henry C, Forensic Science 

Ph.D., New York University 

Director, Forensic Science Laboratory, State of Connecticut 



250 

Matthews, Sharon, Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

M.A., Yale University 
McElfish, Jack K., Fire Science 

M.P.A., M.S., University of New Haven 
McGrath, Thomas, Biology/Environmental Science 

M.S., University of Connecticut 
Reams, D.C., Biology/Environmental Science 

Ph.D., Yale University 
Robbins, Joan, Visiting Director of Theatre, Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

M.F.A., Yale University 
Rosenberg, Henry E., Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

Ph.D., Clark University 
Sandel, Susan Lee, Public Management 

Ph.D., Union Graduate School 

Professional Certification, American College of Health Care Administrators 
Schwartz, Pauline M., Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Tapley, Edward L., Occupational Safety and Health 

M.S., University of New Haven 
Torello, Robert, Management 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Turcotte, Margaret, Management 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 




251 



INDEX 



Absence, Leave of 41 

Academic Calendar 6 

Academic Credit 34 

Academic Honesty 42 

Academic Regulations 33 

Academic Requirements, Financial 

Aid 54 

Academic Status and Progress 35 

Academic Worksheets 36 

Accounting Courses (A) 169 

Accounting, Department of 105 

Accounting, Financial 106 

Accounting, Managerial 106 

Accreditation 13 

Activities, Cultural 62 

Activities, Student 61 

Adding a Class 40 

Administration 234 

Administrative Withdrawal, 

Involuntary 42 

Admission and Registration 27 

Admission, Conditional 29 

Adnnission Procedures 27 

Division of Continuing 

Education 28 

International Students 28 

New Students /Freshmen 27 

Transfer Students 28 

Advanced Placement 35 

Advanced Study 35 

AFROTC, see Air Force Reserve 

Officers Training 

Aid, Financial 53 

Air Force Reserve Officers 

Training 35, 57 

Air Transportation Management 152 
Alumni and Alumni Association 

Scholarships 57 

Alumni Office 62 

American Society of Civil 

Engineers, Student Chapter .... 127 
American Society of Mechanical 

Engineers, see ASME 

Amity Charitable Trust Fund 57 

Analytical and Environmental 

Chemistry, Institute of 25 

Anthropology 92 

Applied Mathematics 84, 85 

Arson Investigation 153, 157 

Art 93,96 

Art Courses (AT) 170 

Arts and Sciences, School of .... 15, 69 
ASME (American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers) 134 



Associate Degrees 17 

Association of Computing 

Machinery, Student Chapter ... 131 
Athletic Complex (Facilities) ... 24, 63 

Athletics Grants-In-Aid 56 

Athletics 62 

Attendance Regulations 42 

Aviation 151 

Aviation Association 151 

Aviation Courses (AE) 172 

Aviation Science 152 



B 



Bachelor's Degrees 17 

Bam Sale Scholarship, The 57 

Benevento (Carmel) Memorial 

Scholarship 57 

Bioengineering 75 

Biology and Environmental 

Science, Department of 72 

Biology Courses (BI) 175 

Biomedical Computing 74 

Black Studies 88 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield — 

Joseph F. Duplinsky 

Scholarship 57 

Board, Administration, and 

Faculty 233 

Board of Governors 233 

Bookstore, see Campus Store 
Bozzuto Charity Sports Classic 

Scholarship 57 

Buckman (Jacob Finley) Endowed 

Chair and Scholarships 123 

Business Administration Ill, 113 

Business Economics 80, 110 

Business Law Courses (LA) 177 

Business, School of 15, 103 



Calendar, Academic 6 

Calendar, Southeastern 

Connecticut 9 

Campus Store 63 

Campus Traditions 61 

Career Development 63 

Career Development Office 63 

Center for Learrung Resources 64 

Certificates 17 

Changes 40 

Changes in Arrangements 51 

Changing a Major 41 

Charger Bulletin, The 62 

Chariot, The 62 

Cheijiical Engineering, Department 

of Chemistry and 77, 123 



Chemical Engineering Club 123 

Chemical Engineering 

Courses (CM) 179 

Chemistry and Chemical 

Engineering, Department of 

(Arts & Sciences) 77 

Chemistry and Chemical 

Engineering, Department of 

(Engineering) 123 

Chemistry Club 123 

Chemistry Courses (CH) 177 

Chemistry, Institute of Analytical 

and Environmental 25 

Chesebrough-Ponds Engineering 

Scholarship 57 

Chi EpsUon 127 

Citytrust Scholarship 57 

Civil and Environmental 

Engineering, Department of ... 126 
Civil Engineering Courses (CE) .. 180 

Class 36 

Class, Dropping/Adding a 40 

Class, Withdrawal from a 40 

Club Managers Association of 

America, Student Chapter 143 

Clubs and Organizations 61 

College Work Study Program 56 

Communication Courses (CO) ... 183 
Communication, Department of 

(Arts & Sciences) 78 

Communication, Department of 

(Business) 106 

Community-Clinical Psychology . 90 
Computation Laboratory, 

Engineering 24 

Computer Center 24 

Computer Engineering 

Department of Electrical and .. 128 
Computer Laboratories, Personal . 25 

Computer Science 84, 130 

Computer Science Courses (CS) . 185 
Computer Science (Applied 

Mathematics) 84 

Computer Science, Department of 

Industrial Engineering and 130 

Computer Studies, Institute of 25 

Computing Machinery, Association 

of (Student Chapter) 131 

Conditional Admission 29 

Connecticut Independent College 

Student Grant Program 56 

Cormecticut Scholastic Achievement 

Grant Program 56 

Continuing Education, 

Division of 16, 161 

Continuing Education, School of 

Professional Studies and ... 15, 149 

Cooperative Education 64 

Coordinated Course 34 

Core Curriculum 19 

Corporate and Professional 

Development, Division of . 16, 166 



252 



Corporate On-Site Training 167 

Corporate Programs, 

Off-Campus 164 

Corrections 116 

Credit for Prior Learning 162 

Counseling Center 65 

Councils 61 

Courses (Descriptions) 169 

Course Overload Restrictions 30 

Course Work Expectations 43 

Courses Available at Other 

Colleges 34 

Credit, Academic 34 

Credit, Transfer 34, 42 

Credit, Ways of Earning 34 

Crediting Examinations 35 

Criminal Justice 115, 116, 118, 153 

Criminal Justice Courses (CJ) 187 

Cultural Activities 61 

CWSP 56 



D 



David Humphreys Honors 

Program 70 

Dean's List 38 

Deferred Enrollment 29 

Degrees Offered by the 

University (see also Programs of 

Study listing on page 4) 17 

Development Office 65 

Developmental Studies Program .. 65 
Dietetic Technology 

Courses (DI) 190 

Disabled Student Services 66 

Dismissal / Readmission 

Procedure 39 

Division of Continuing 

Education 16, 161 

Division of Corporate 

and Professional 

Development 16, 166 

Donor Scholarships 56 

Dropping/Adding a Class 40 

Dunham (Clarence) Scholarship ... 57 



Earning Credit, Ways of 34 

Echlin Family Scholarships 58 

Economics Courses (EC) 191 

Economics, Department of 

(Arts & Sciences) 79 

Economics /Finance, Department 

of (Business) 109 

Eder Brothers Scholarships 58 

Electrical and Computer 

Engineering, Department of ... 128 



Electrical Engineering 

Courses (EE) 192 

Employn\ent, Student 63 

Engineering Computation 

Laboratory 24 

Engineering, School of 15, 121 

Engineering Science 

Courses (ES) 195 

English Club, The 81 

English Courses (E) 196 

English, Department of 80 

Enrollment, Deferred 29 

Environmental Chemistry, 

Institute of Analytical and 25 

Environmental Engineering, 

Department of Civil and 126 

Environmental Science 76, 77 

Environmental Studies 

Courses (SC) 226 

Eta Sigma Delta 142 

Examination, Writing Proficiency . 44 

Examinations, Crediting 35 

Excellence Awards, University 56 

Expenses, Tuition, Fees and 47 



Facilities, Athletic 24, 63 

Facilities of the University 

Services and 23 

Faculty 240 

Faculty Professional Licensure and 

Accreditation 248 

Faculty Senate 249 

Family Grant Program 56 

Fees and Expenses, Tuition 47 

Fees, Other 48 

Finance 110 

Finance Courses (FI) 198 

Financial Accounting 106 

Financial Aid 53 

Fine and Applied Arts 93 

Fire and Occupational Safety 156 

Fire Prevention 157 

Fire Protection Engineering 154 

Fire Science 153, 156, 157 

Fire Science Administration 155 

Fire Science Certificates 157 

Fire Science Club 153 

Fire Science Courses (FS) 198 

Fire Science Technology 155 

Foreign Language Study 81 

Foreign Students, see 

International Students 

Forensic Science 117 

Fraternities and Sororities 62 

French Courses (PR) 201 

Full-time Students 35 



General Dietetics and Dietetic 

Technology Courses (DI) 190 

General Policies 42 

General Psychology 91 

General Studies 71 

German Courses (GR) 201 

Gerowin (James Jacob) Memorial 

Scholarship 58 

Grade Point Average, see 

Quality Point Ratio 

Grade Reports 38 

Grading System 37 

Graduate Degrees 17 

Graduate School 16 

Graduation 43 

Graduation Criteria 43 

Grants 55, 56 

Grants-In-Aid (University and 

Athletic) 56 

Graphic Design 94, 95, 97 

Greater New Haven 

Consumer Credit Association 

Scholarship 58 

Groton/New London location, see 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 



H 



Hazardous Materials 157 

Health Administration 119 

Health Services 66 

History Courses (HS) 201 

History, Department of 82 

History (of the University) 13 

Honesty, Academic 42 

Honors 44 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Courses (HR) 202 

Hotel and Restaurant Management, 

Department of 144 

Hotel /Restaurant Society 142 

Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism 

Adnunistration, School of . 15, 141 
Hotel Sales and Marketing 

Association Club 142 

Housing, see Residential Life 
Human Resources 

Management 112 

Humanities Courses (HU) 203 

Humphreys (David) Honors 

Program 70 



I 



Independent College Student 

Grant Program, Connecticut 56 

Independent Study 35 

Industrial Engineering and 

Computer Science, 

Department of 130 

Industrial Engineering 

Courses (IE) 204 

Industrial Fire Protection 157 

Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 91 

Industrial Technology: 

Shipbuilding 137 

Institute of Analytical and 

Environmental Chemistry 25 

Institute of Computer Studies 25 

Institute of Industrial Engineers, 

Student Chapter 131 

Institute of Law and Public 

Affairs, The 87 

Interior Design 95, 96, 97 

International Business 114, 115 

International Business 

Courses (IB) 206 

International Services 66 

International Students, Admission 

Procedure 28 

Intersession, Winter 164 

Intramural Programs (Sports) 63 

Involuntary Administrative 

Withdrawal 42 



J 



Journalism 78, 79 

Journalism Courses (J) 206 



K 



Kane (Paul) Memorial 

Scholarship 

Kaplan (Nathanial) Memorial 

Scholarship 



58 
58 



Laboratory, Engineering 

Computation 24 

Law (Business) Courses (LA) 177 

Law and Public Affairs, The 

Institute of 87 

Law Enforcement 

Administration 116 



Law Enforcement Science .... 116, 118 

Learning Resources, Center for 64 

Leave of Absence 41 

Legal Affairs 88 

Leuzzi (Peggy) Memorial 

Scholarship 58 

Library, Marvin K. Peterson 23 

List, Dean's 38 

Literature 81, 82 

Loans 55 

Logistics (Defense sectors) 137 

Logistics Courses (LG) 206 



M 



Major 37 

Major Aid Programs 55 

Major, Changing a 41 

Make-up Policy 43 

Management Club Ill 

Management Courses (MG) 207 

Management, Department of Ill 

Management Information 

Systems 112 

Management Information Science 

Courses (MS) 207 

Management of Sports 

Industries 112 

Managerial Accounting 106 

Managerial and Organizational 

Communication 107 

Mandour (Ahmed) Memorial 

Scholarship 58 

Marine Technology Courses, 

Shipbuilding and (SB) 226 

Marketing and International 

Business, Department of 113 

Marketing Clubs 113 

Marketing Courses (MK) 209 

Markle (Arnold) Scholarship 58 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial 

Scholarship 58 

Marvin K. Peterson Library 23 

Mass Communication 108 

Materials Technology 135, 136 

Materials Technology 

Courses (MT) 212 

Mathematics Club 83 

Mathematics Courses (M) 210 

Mathematics, Department of 83 

Matriculation 36 

Meal Plans 66 

Mechanical Engineering 

Courses (ME) 213 

Mechanical Engineering, 

Department of 131 

Mechanical Engineers, American 

Society of (Student Chapter) 
see ASME 



253 

Mechanical Technology: 

Shipbuilding 137 

Middlesex Mutual Assurance 

Company Scholarship 58 

Minor 37 

Minority Affairs 66 

Music 98,99 

Music and Sound Recording .... 98,99 
Music Courses (MU) 215 



N 



National Association of Accountants 

Scholarship 58 

Natural Sciences 

(Applied Mathematics) 85 

New Students, Admission 

Procedure 27 

Newspaper 

(The Charger Bulletin) 62 

Nutrition 76 



o 



Occupational Safety 

and Health 156 

Occupational Safety and 

Health Administration 158,159 

Occupational Safety and 

Health Courses (SH) 217 

Occupational Safety and 

Health Technology 159,160 

Off-Campus Corporate 

Programs 164 

On-Site Training, Corporate 167 

Organizations, Clubs and 61 

Overload Restrictions, Course 30 



Paralegal Studies 88 

Parent Loans for 

Undergraduate Students 55 

Parker (Virginia M.) 

Scholarship 58 

Part-time Students 36 

Payments 49 

Pell Grants 55 

Perkins Loan Program 55 

Personal Computer Laboratories .. 25 
Peterson Library, 

Marvin K 23 

Peterson (Marvin K.) 

Scholarships 58 

Phi Alpha Theta 82 

Philosophy 99,100 



254 

Philosophy (of the University) 14 

Philosophy Courses (PL) 217 

Photography 

(Graphic Design) 94, 95 97 

Physics Courses (PH) 218 

Physics, Department of 86 

Pilot, Professional 152 

Placement 29 

Placement, Advanced 35 

PLUS 55 

Point Ratio, Quality 38 

Policy, Make-up 43 

Policy, Residence Hall Refund 50 

Policy, Tuition Refund 49 

Policies, General 42 

PoUtical Science 

Courses (PS) 219 

Political Science, 

Department of 87 

Practitioners-ln-Residence 249 

Pre- Architecture 

(Interior Design) 96 

Premedical/Predental/ 

Preveterinary 73 

Presidential Scholarships 56 

Probation and Dismissal 39 

Procedure, Dismissal/ 

Readmission 39 

Professional Development, Division 

of Corporate and 16, 166 

Professional Development 

Seminars 167 

Professional Pilot Certificate 152 

Professional Studies 149, 160 

Professional Studies, 

Department of 15, 150 

Professional Studies and Continuing 

Education, School of 15, 149 

Proficiency Examination, 

Writing 44 

Programs of Study, Listing 4 

Programs, Major Aid (Financial) .. 55 

Progress, Academic Status and 35 

Progress, Satisfactory 38 

Psi Chi Honor Society 90 

Psychology Club 90 

Psychology Courses (P) 223 

Psychology, Department of 89 

Public Administration 118, 119 

Public Administration 

Courses (PA) 224 

PubUc Affairs 89 

Public Affairs, 

The Institute of Law and 87 

Public Management, 

Department of 115 

Public Policy 

(Campaign Management) 88 

Public Relations 

(Communication) 108 

Publications (Student) 62 



Q 



QPR, see (Quality Point Ratio 

Quality Point Ratio 38 

Quantitative Analysis 

Courses (QA) 225 



R 



Radio, WNHU 67 

Ratio, Quality Point 38 

Readmission Procedure 39, 40 

Refund Policy, Residence Hall 50 

Refund Policy, Tuition 49 

Registration 29 

Regulations, Academic 33 

Regulations, Attendance 42 

Repetition of Work 39 

Reports, Grade 38 

Reserve Officers Training, 

Air Force 35, 57 

Residence Hall Refund Policy 50 

Residency Requirement 43 

Residential Life 67 

Restrictions, Course Overload 30 

Rosazza (Eugene and Mary) 

Scholarship Fund 59 

Russian Courses (RU) 225 



Satisfactory Progress 38 

Scholarships 56 

Scholastic Achievement Grant 

Program, Connecticut 56 

School, Graduate 16 

School of Arts & Sciences 15, 69 

School of Business 15, 103 

School of Engineering 15, 121 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and 

Tourism Administration 15, 141 

School of Professional Studies and 

Continuing Education 15, 149 

Schools of the University 15 

Science and Environmental 

Studies Courses (SC) 226 

Security Management 117,118 

Seminars, Professional 

Development 167 

SEOG 55 

Servicemembers Opportunity 

CoUeges (SOC) 166 

Services and Facilities of 

the University 23 

Services (Disabled Student, Health, 

International) 66 



Shipbuilding and Marine 

Technology Courses (SB) 226 

Shipbuilding Technologies 

(UNH in Southeastern CT) 136 

Shipyard Management 

Courses (SM) 227 

SLS 55 

Snuth ( DeForest) Scholarship 59 

Social Service 92 

Social Services Courses (SW) 229 

Sociology Courses (SO) 227 

Sociology, Department of 91 

Sororities, Fraternities and 62 

Sound Recording, Music and .. 98, 99 
Southeastern Connecticut, 

Calendar 9 

Southeastern Connecticut Student 

Council Scholarship (UNH) 59 

Southeastern Connecticut, 

UNH in 16,165 

Southern Connecticut Gas Company 

Scholarship 59 

Spanish Courses (SP) 230 

Sports, Varsity 62 

Sports (Intramural) 63 

SSL 55 

Stafford Student Loan 55 

State Scholarships 56 

Statistics (Applied Mathematics).... 85 

Status, Transfer of Student 36 

Store, Campus 63 

Student Activities 61 

Student Center 67 

Student Council Scholarship 

(UNH at Southeastern 

Connecticut) 59 

Student Councils 61 

Student Employment 63 

Student Life 61 

Student Publications 62 

Student Status, Transfer of 36 

Students, Full-time 35 

Students, Part-time 36 

Study, Advanced 35 

Study, Independent 35 

Summer Sessions 164 

Supplemental Educational 

C^portimity Grant 55 

Supplemental Loan for 

Students 55 

System, Grading 37 

T 

TAP 57 

Theatre Arts 97 

Theatre Arts Courses (T) 230 

Theatre Productions 97 

Tourism and Travel 

Administration Courses (TT) .. 230 



255 



Tourism and Travel Administration, ^^ 

Department of 146 X 

Traditions, Campus 61 

Transfer of Credit Yearbook {The Chariot) 62 

from the University 42 

Transfer of Credit 

to the University 34 

Transfer of Student Status 36 

Transfer Students, 

Admission Procedure 28 

Travel Club 142 

Tuition Assistance Program 57 

Tuition Refund Policy 49 

Tuition, Fees and Expenses 47 



u 



Undergraduate Degrees 17 

Undergraduate Trimester Calendar, 

Southeastern Connecticut 9 

UNH in Southeastern 

Connecticut 16, 165 

UNH/Citytrust Loan Program 

for Day Students 55 

UNH/Citytrust Loan Program 

for Evening Students 56 

University Core Curriculum 19 

University Excellence Awards 56 

University Grants-In-Aid 56 



V 



Varsity Sports 62 

Visual and Performing Arts and 
Philosophy, Department of 93 



w 



Ways of Earning Credit 34 

West Haven Scholarship 59 

Wiggin & Dana Scholarship 59 

Winter Intersession 164 

Withdrawal from a Class 40 

Withdrawal from the University .. 41 
Withdrawal, Involuntary 

Administrative 42 

WNHU Radio 67 

Women's Affairs 67 

Work, Repetition of 39 

Work-Study Program, College 56 

Worksheets, Academic 36 

Writing 81 

Writing Proficiency 

Examination 44 




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